Michael Dare Asemoloye (Ph.D) - University of Ibadan

Michael Dare Asemoloye (Ph.D)

University of Ibadan

Ibadan, Oyo State | Nigeria

Main Specialties: Biology

Additional Specialties: Biotechnology/Mycology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0003-4339-1251

Michael Dare Asemoloye (Ph.D) - University of Ibadan

Michael Dare Asemoloye (Ph.D)

Introduction

Michael Dare Asemoloye (Ph.D) is a Researcher who focuses on Mycology/Fungal Biotechnology, obtained his Doctorate Degree from the University of Ibadan. He has notable awards/achievements like The COIMBRA Scholarship Award 2018, CV Raman Fellowship in India (2018), World Academy of Science (TWAS) 2015, Comsats abt Doctoral Grant (2016), the University Postgraduate Scholarship (Scholar) at the University of Ibadan 2015, 2016, 2017, University TA Scheme 2014, 2015 and 2016, UCLM Award 2016, and OGCC Young Scientist Award etc.. His research is mainly on Mycology/Biotechnology with many publications in both local and international highly refereed journals.

Primary Affiliation: University of Ibadan - Ibadan, Oyo State , Nigeria

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Jan 2014
University of Ibadan
Ph.D in view
Department of Botany

Experience

Jul 2014
Postgraduate School University of Ibadan
University Postgraduate Scholar
Department of Botany and Microbiology

Publications

16Publications

46Reads

991Profile Views

Degradation of 2, 2-Dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate (dichlorvos) through the rhizosphere interaction between Panicum maximum Jacq and some selected fungi.

Chemosphere 2019 Apr 9;221:403-411. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Environmental Sciences, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, 22060 Abbottabad, Pakistan. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2019.01.058DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads
3.340 Impact Factor

Synergistic plant-microbes interactions in the rhizosphere: a potential headway for the remediation of hydrocarbon polluted soils.

Int J Phytoremediation 2019 18;21(2):71-83. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

b Department of Environmental Sciences , COMSATS Institute of Information Technology , Abbottabad , Pakistan.

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15226514.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15226514.2018.1474437DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads
1.739 Impact Factor

Transcriptomic responses of catalase, peroxidase and laccase encoding genes and enzymatic activities of oil spill inhabiting rhizospheric fungal strains.

Environ Pollut 2018 Apr 21;235:55-64. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Food and Environmental Mycology/Biotechnology Unit, Department of Botany, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02697491173257
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.12.042DOI Listing
April 2018
29 Reads
4.143 Impact Factor

Synergistic action of rhizospheric fungi with Megathyrsus maximus root speeds up hydrocarbon degradation kinetics in oil polluted soil

Chemosphere 2017 Sep 187;1-10

Chemosphere

This study was aimed at combining the potentials of plant and some rhizospheric fungal strains in remediation of crude-oil polluted soil. Four new rhizospheric fungi were identified from an aged crude-oil polluted site and used with Megathyrsus maximus (guinea grass) for a 90 day synergistic remediation experiment. Cultures of these strains were first mixed with spent mushroom compost (SMC), the mixture was then applied to a sterilized crude oil polluted soil at concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40% potted in three replicates. Soil with plant alone (0%1) and soil with fungi-SMC alone (0%2) served as controls. The soil's initial and final pH, nutrient, 16 EPA PAHs and heavy metal contents were determined, degradation rate, half-life and percentage loss of the total polyaromatic hydrocarbon (TPAH) were also calculated. Finally, the remediated soils were further screened for seed germination supporting index. The fungal strains were identified and registered at NCBI as Aspergillus niger asemoA (KY473958.1), Talaromyces purpurogenus asemoF (KY488463.1), Trichoderma harzianum asemoJ (KY488466.1) and Aspergillus flavus asemoM (KY488467.1). We observed for the first time that the synergistic mechanism improved the soil nutrient, reduced the heavy metal concentration and sped up hydrocarbon degradation rate. Using the initial and final concentrations of the TPAH, we recorded highest biodegradation rates (K1) and half-life (t1/2) in 30 and 40% treatments over controls, these treatments also had highest seed germination supporting index. This work suggests that the set-up synergistic remediation could be used to remediate crude oil polluted soil and this could be used in large scale.

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August 2017
7 Reads

Fungi and Aflatoxin Contamination of Sausage Rolls in Ibadan Nigeria

Jonathan et al. 20`16. Fungi and Aflatoxin Contamination of Sausage Rolls in Ibadan Nigeria.International Journal of Scientific Research in Knowledge, 4(5), pp. 099-104

International Journal of Scientific Research in Knowledge

Sausage roll is one of the most important snacks that are widely consumed in Nigeria but contamination of foods especially snacks by fungi is a major threat to food security. Four popularly consumed sausage rolls bought from different locations in Ibadan, Nigera were examined for fungi contaminations and analyzed for aflatoxin. The coupling of characteristics of the mycelia such as the colour and structure, septation, presence or absence of sporangiophores and other fruiting bodies as well as other special organs like the rhizoids were recorded, HPLC/MS was used for the aflatoxin detection technique with excitation wavelength of 362 nm, and emission wavelength of 425nm. The result reveals the presence of high incidence of four fungi genera comprising of seven different species which include: Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. tamarii, Fusarium species, Penicillium notatum and Rhizopus species. Of all the fungi isolates, A. flavus and A. niger had the highest percentage of occurrence of 100% each while A. fumigatus gave 50%, A. tamarii (16.67%) and Fusarium species (16.67) and R. nigricans (25%) had the least. Aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2 were detected in all the collected samples AFB1 (1.88±1.65) was the highest in sample C and least in sample D (1.08±1.50). AFB2 was highest on sample D (1.98±1.00) and least in B (0.99±1.00), AFG1 was highest in C (1.230±50) and least in A (0.92±2.50) while AFG2 was recorded highest in B (1.73±1.93) and least in D (0.91±1.08). However, the aflatoxin contents were found to be below the tolerance limit of 2ppb given by European commission.

http://ijsrpub.com/uploads/papers/IJSRK/2016/Jun/IJSRK-16-67.pdf

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November 2016
4 Reads

Food Value, Fungi and Aflatoxin Detection in Stored 'Orunla' Abelmoschus esculentus L. (Moench) from Ibadan, Nigeria

Jonathan S.G., Asemoloye M.D * ., Abe A., Olawuyi O.J. and Aina D. Food Value, Fungi and Aflatoxin D

Researcher

Five samples of ‘orunla’ (sliced dried okra fruits) were purchased from selected markets within Ibadan city, Nigeria. These were wrapped in cellophane paper and stored for 4 months. Laboratory made ‘orunla’ samples which acts as control were also prepared. Mycoorganisms were isolated from fresh and stored samples. Effect of storage time on proximate and mineral element contents (Fe, Mg, and P) were also determined. Both fresh and stored ‘orunla’ samples were also screened for possible aflatoxin contamination. The results of the work showed that, biodeteriorating fungi isolated from the market samples and their percentage occurrences include Aspergillus flavus (16.88%), A. niger (16.23%), A. fumigatus (16.23%) and Rhizopus nigricans (16.23%) while Mucor mucedo (5%), Candida albicans (2%) and Trichoderma sp. (2%) had the least percentage occurrences. The moisture contents of the samples range from (9.80% to 16.36%), protein (11.27% to 18.74%), ether extract (1.37% to 2.11%), crude fiber (38.18 % 41.27%), ash (11.70% to 12.55%), carbohydrates (31.15% to31.58%) and dry matter (45.07% to 45.22%). Storage time had significant effect on the nutrient and aflatoxin content of all the samples (P>0.05). Mg and P values were not significantly different from each other except the control. Also, the storage time had effect on the Aflatoxin content in market samples as their aflatoxin content varied and increased with the time of storage. Highest concentration of aflatoxin was detected in Ojaoba samples (10.20µ/Kg AFB1, 7.30µ/Kg AFB2, 5.7µ/Kg AFG1 and 3.22µ/KgAFG2), Moniya (8.50µ/Kg AFB1, 6.3µ/Kg AFB2, 4.9µ/KgAFG1 and 3.17µ/KgAFG2) and Apete (9.7µ/Kg AFB1, 4.4µ/Kg AFB2, 3.8µ/Kg AFG1 and 2.9µ/KgAFG2) samples while the least aflatoxin was detected in the control (0.0µ/Kg AFB1, AFG1 AFG2 and 0.13µ/Kg AFB2) and Ojoo (2.50µ/Kg AFB1, 2.10µ/Kg AFB2, 2.1µ/Kg AFG1 and 1.90µ/KgAFG2) after four month of storage. The implication of these results were discussed. [Jonathan S.G., Asemoloye M.D * ., Abe A., Olawuyi O.J. and Aina D. Food Value, Fungi and Aflatoxin Detection in Stored ‘Orunla’ Abelmoschus esculentus L. (Moench) from Ibadan, Nigeria. Researcher 2016;8(2):7-18]. ISSN 1553-9865 (print); ISSN 2163-8950 (online). http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher. 2. doi:10.7537/marsrsj08021602

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August 2016
4 Reads

Fungal Biodeterioration, Aflatoxin Contamination, and Nutrient Value of "Suya Spices".

Scientifica (Cairo) 2016 22;2016:4602036. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

Food & Environmental Mycology/Biotechnology Unit, Department of Botany, University of Ibadan, Ibadan 200284, Oyo State, Nigeria.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4602036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4820623PMC
April 2016
8 Reads

PRODUCTION OF α-AMYLASE FROM Aspergillus oryzae ISOLATED FROM FERMENTED COCOA BEANS USING SUBMERGE FERMENTATION TECHNIQUES

Gbolagade et al.; JOBAN, 5(3): 131-139, 2016

Journal of Biology and Nature

Discoveries of enzymes many of which are starch degrading enzymes have influenced higher application of amylases in various industrial processes. Different species of Aspergillus fungi were screened from cocoa beans for α-amylase production. Aspergillus oryzae (GYC 101), produced the highest clear zone of hydrolysis and the degree of amylase activity was indicated by the width of the zone of hydrolysis around the central growth of each culture. This isolate did best on submerged fermentation medium M5 which containing (g/l): Starch 20, yeast extract 8.5, NH4Cl 1.3, MgSO4.7H2O, 0.12, CaCl2 0.06 with enzyme activity of 400U/ml. Purification of α-amylase enzyme of the fungi isolate resulted in specific activity of 280.9 (U/mg) with purification folds 1.3 out of all the other medium. The specific activity of amylase broth was 208.3 U/mg of protein before treating with ammonium sulfate at 20-40 % (w/v) saturation shows no activity but 70 % (w/v) saturation concentration showed the maximum specific activity (280.9 U/mg of protein) with 1.3 fold purification.

http://www.ikpress.org/abstract/5322

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April 2016
4 Reads

Influence of spent mushroom compost (SMC) of Pleurotus ostreatus on the yield and nutrient compositions of Telfairia occidentalis Hook .F.A. (Pumpkin) ,a Nigerian leafy vegetable

Jonathan S.G, Oyetunji O.J and Asemoloye M.A. Influence of spent mushroom compost (SMC) of Pleurot

Nature and Science

The potted pumpkin plants studied were harvested after twelve weeks and the results obtained showed that Telfairia occidentalis planted on 30% SMC soil had the best growth followed by 20%, 50%, 0% and 100% SMC (in respect to plant height, leaf number, stem girth, and leaf area). The Biological Efficiencies (B.E.) of the vegetable was calculated using the field dry weight (FDW) of the plant and the results obtained showed that 30% SMC produced the best above and below ground biomass with B.E. of 40.2% and 29.8% followed by 20% SMC (23.9% and 24% B.E.) and 10% SMC (14.1% and14%). The least B.E. was 1.4 and 4.9% of the 0 and 100% SMC plants respectively. Moreover, the mineral contents of the vegetable revealed that most of the minerals such as iron, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus and potassium increased as the concentration of the SMC in the soil increases, while zinc concentration decreases with SMC treatments. The pH values of SMC treated soil increased significantly with the % of SMC in the soil. The significance of the above observation was discussed. [ Jonathan S.G, Oyetunji O.J and Asemoloye M.A. Influence of spent mushroom compost (SMC) of Pleurotus ostreatus on the yield and nutrient compositions of Telfairia occidentalis Hook .F.A. (Pumpkin) ,a Nigerian leafy vegetable. Nat Sci 2012;10(10):149-156]. (ISSN: 1545-0740). http://www.sciencepub.net/nature. 21

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March 2016
3 Reads

Nutritional value, Fungi bio-deterioration and Aflatoxin Contaminations of aadun (Maize Snacks) a Novel Nigerian Indigenous Snacks

[Jonathan, Segun Gbolagade; Adeniyi, Mary Adejoke and Asemoloye, Michael Dare. Nutrientional value, Fungi bio-deterioration and Aflatoxin contaminations of Maize Snacks (aadun). Researcher 2015; 7 (12):26-31

Researcher

This study on Aadun (a popular staple food in Nigeria, prepared as snack from maize) was carried out on samples collected from different areas in South Western Nigeria and compared with a laboratory prepared ones. Proximate and aflatoxin contents of the food were detected and fungi responsible for its bio-deterioration were isolated and studied. The prominent fungi isolated are Rhizopus stolonifer, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger and Trichoderma koningi. Proximate composition of the samples were significantly different (P<0.05) with moisture (9.80% to 11.03%), ash (5.53% to 6.90%) and carbohydrate (47.40% to 52.57%) contents but low in fibre (3.43% to 3.93%) and fat (16.63% to 21.13%) contents. Most of the vented samples are confirmed to contain certain amount of aflatoxins concentrations but vary generally based on the sample locations, Aflatoxin G1 and G2 were found in all the samples except the control (laboratory prepared) and high level of Aflatoxin G1 of 12.8 (µ/kg) and 12.3 (µ/kg) were detected on Oja Oba and Ibode samples while the control gave the least (0.13 µ/kg). Aflatoxins B2, G1 and G2 are below the tolerable limits for human consumption (FAO standard). Aflatoxin B1 was generally higher on the samples and this can be attributed to the fact that when aflatoxin is produced by either Aspergillus flavus or Aspergillus parasiticus, aflatoxin B1 is the first metabolite released before others (aflatoxins B2, G1 and G2) depending on the production rate which takes time, therefore the level of carcinogenicity can be put as B1˃B2˃G1˃G2

http://www.sciencepub.net/researcher/research071215/004_29708researcher071215_26_31.pdf

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March 2016
5 Reads

Effect of Cultural Condition on the Production of α-Amylase from Fermented Cocoa Beans using Submerge Fermentation Techniques

http://www.ikpress.org/journal-articles/38

Journal of Biochemistry International 2(4): 138-152, 2015 ISSN: 2454-4760

This study identifies the best cultural conditions and nutritional requirements for the selected fungi species isolated from cocoa beans for production of α-amylase and this was studied in 250ml Erlenmeyer flasks. Six different fermentation media (M1–M6) of different compositions were evaluated for this purpose. The medium containing M5 medium (g/l); starch 20, yeast extracted 8.5 NH4Cl 1.3, MgSO4.7H2O 0.12, CaCl2 0.06 gave maximum enzyme production. Effect of inoculums size, incubation period, temperature, pH, metal ions, and chemical compounds were investigated on the enzyme production and was observed that these conditions can affect the rate of enzyme production. However, Optimum enzyme production of the fungi (Aspegillus oryza) was obtained at 72 hours of incubation at temperature of 30ºC, pH 5, inoculum size 4% and optimum level of ammonium sulphate precipitated produced saturation level of 70% that gave 1.3 fold enzyme purification. Using Sephadex-DEAE column, the active fractions were eluted using 0.05 M Tris-HCl buffer containing 0.30 M NaCl at pH 7.5. The molecular weight of α-amylase was found to be 47 kDa on SDS-PAGE after gel filtration. The maximum activity was achieved after 30 min at 40ºC and pH 5 in the presence of Ca+2 ion. Journal of Biochemistry International 2(4): 138-152, 2015 ISSN: 2454-4760 Location: International Knowledge Press S107, 3 Hardman Square, Spinningfields, Manchester, M3 3EB, UK Publisher: International Knowledge Press Journal Name: Journal of Biochemistry International Research Interests: Mycology, Enzymology, Biotechnology, Industrial Biotechnology, Microbial biotechnology, and 8 more

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January 2016
4 Reads

https://www.academia.edu/8790386/Growth_responses_of_Cochorus_olitorius_to_different_SMC_contrentrations

Jonathan SG, Oyetunji OJ, Olawuyi OJ and Asemoloye. Growth responses of Corchorus olitorius Lin. (J

Academia arena

This study was carried out in a green house with the aim of assessing the response of jute plant to the spent mushroom compost (SMC ) application as a organic fertilizer. The potted vegetable (jute) studied were planted in pots and harvested after ten weeks of cultivation and it was observed that the vegetable planted on 20% SMC soil had the best growth followed by 30%, 50%, 0% and 100% SMC respectively (in terms of plant height, leaf number, stem girth, and leaf area). The results obtained for biological efficiencies (B.E.) showed that 20% SMC had the best above and below ground biomass with B.E. of 30.5% and 32.8% followed by 30% SMC (24.8% and 23.4% B.E.) and 10% SMC (15.9% and13.9%), the least B.E. was 2.5 and 11% above ground and 3.3% and 14.2 below ground of the 0 and 100% SMC plants respectively. Moreover, the SMC was able to improve mineral composition of this vegetable. It was observed that, phosphorus and potassium were the best mineral elements of vegetable and mineral elements (iron, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus and potassium) were observed to increase as the concentration of the SMC in the soil increased to 100%.However, zinc decreased with SMC treatment, while manganese concentrations increased to 30% SMC. SMC application was found to increase the soil pH by ±2. The pH values of the soil treated with SMC increased significantly with the SMC percentages in the soil. It was found to have increased from 4.8 to 6.7 and 7.0 in the potted plant with the highest yield. [ Jonathan SG, Oyetunji OJ, Olawuyi OJ and Asemoloye. Growth responses of Corchorus olitorius Lin. (Jute) to the application of SMC as an organic fertilizer. Academ Arena 2012;4(9):48-56] (ISSN 1553-992X). http://www.sciencepub.net/academia. 6

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Growth responses of Cochorus olitorius to different SMC contrentrations

https://www.academia.edu/8790386/Growth_responses_of_Cochorus_olitorius_to_different_SMC_contrentrat

Academia arena

Academia Arena 2012:4(9) http://www.sciencepub.net/academia 48 Growth responses of Corchorus olitorius Lin. (Jute) to the application of SMC as an organic fertilizer a Jonathan SG 1 , b Oyetunji OJ 1 , c Olawuyi OJ 1 and a Asemoloye MD 1 a Mycology& Biotechnology unit, b Plant Physiology & Soil Biology unit c Genetics & Molecular Biology unit Department of Botany & Microbiology, University of Ibadan. Ibadan. Nigeria sg.jonathan@mail.ui.edu.ng Abstract: This study was carried out in a green house with the aim of assessing the response of jute plant to the spent mushroom compost (SMC ) application as a organic fertilizer. The potted vegetable (jute) studied were planted in pots and harvested after ten weeks of cultivation and it was observed that the vegetable planted on 20% SMC soil had the best growth followed by 30%, 50%, 0% and 100% SMC respectively (in terms of plant height, leaf number, stem girth, and leaf area). The results obtained for biological efficiencies (B.E.) showed that 20% SMC had the best above and below ground biomass with B.E. of 30.5% and 32.8% followed by 30% SMC (24.8% and 23.4% B.E.) and 10% SMC (15.9% and13.9%), the least B.E. was 2.5 and 11% above ground and 3.3% and 14.2 below ground of the 0 and 100% SMC plants respectively. Moreover, the SMC was able to improve mineral composition of this vegetable. It was observed that, phosphorus and potassium were the best mineral elements of vegetable and mineral elements (iron, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus and potassium) were observed to increase as the concentration of the SMC in the soil increased to 100%.However, zinc decreased with SMC treatment, while manganese concentrations increased to 30% SMC. SMC application was found to increase the soil pH by ±2. The pH values of the soil treated with SMC increased significantly with the SMC percentages in the soil. It was found to have increased from 4.8 to 6.7 and 7.0 in the potted plant with the highest yield. [ Jonathan SG, Oyetunji OJ, Olawuyi OJ and Asemoloye. Growth responses of Corchorus olitorius Lin. (Jute) to the application of SMC as an organic fertilizer. Academ Arena 2012;4(9):48-56] (ISSN 1553-992X). http://www.sciencepub.net/academia. 6

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Rafiq Ahmad
Rafiq Ahmad

Chonbuk National University

3