Publications by authors named "Mian Abdur Rehman Arif"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

QTL analysis of seed germination traits in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

J Appl Genet 2021 Mar 5. Epub 2021 Mar 5.

Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK), Gatersleben, Germany.

Genetic mapping of seed germination traits has been performed with many plant species. In tobacco, however, investigations are rare. In the present study, a bi-parental mapping population consisting of 118 doubled haploid lines and derived from a cross between 'Beinhart-1000' and 'Hicks' was investigated. Four germination-related traits, total germination (TG), normal germination (NG), time to reach 50% of total germination (T50), and the area under the curve after 200 h of germination (AUC) were considered by examining seeds either untreated or after a moderate controlled deterioration (CD). Quantitative trait loci were found for all traits distributed on 11 out of the 24 linkage groups. It was demonstrated that, as in many other species, germination-related traits are very complex and under polygenic control.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13353-021-00623-6DOI Listing
March 2021

A GWAS to identify the cereal cyst nematode (Heterodera filipjevi) resistance loci in diverse wheat prebreeding lines.

J Appl Genet 2021 Feb 6;62(1):93-98. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Geneshifters, 222 Mary Jena Lane, Pullman, WA, 99163, USA.

Yield losses because of cereal cyst nematodes could be as high as 92%, causing a bottleneck for wheat production. An integrated approach (application of pesticides, crop rotation, and use of host resistance) is needed to manage this devastating pathogen where resistant cultivars are considered most effective. This necessitates the identification of nematode-resistant sources in the available germplasm. Here, we report on the genetic mapping of nematode resistance in 255 diverse prebreeding lines (PBLs) employing an association mapping strategy. Altogether, seven additive quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified on chromosomes 1A, 2A, 2B, 2D, 3A, 6B, and 6D explaining a maximum of 9.42% phenotypic variation where at least five QTL (on chromosomes 2A, 2B, 2D, 6B, and 6D) are located on the same chromosomes that harbor the already known nematode resistance genes. Resistant PBLs carried Aegilops squarrosa (436) in their pedigree which could be the possible source of positive alleles. To add to it, better yield performance of the identified nematode-resistant lines under stress conditions indicates that the germplasm can provide both nematode resistance and high-yielding cultivars.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13353-020-00607-yDOI Listing
February 2021

A GBS-based GWAS analysis of adaptability and yield traits in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

J Appl Genet 2021 Feb 30;62(1):27-41. Epub 2020 Oct 30.

Nuclear Institute for Agriculture and Biology College. Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (NIAB-C, PIEAS), Jhang Road, Faisalabad, Pakistan.

Wheat is a foremost food grain of Pakistan and occupies a vital position in agricultural policies of the country. Wheat demand will be increased by 60% by 2050 which is a serious concern to meet this demand. Conventional breeding approaches are not enough to meet the demand of growing human population. It is paramount to integrate underutilized genetic diversity into wheat gene pool through efficient and accurate breeding tools and technology. In this study, we present the genetic analysis of a 312 diverse pre-breeding lines using DArT-seq SNPs seeking to elucidate the genetic components of emergence percentage, heading time, plant height, lodging, thousand kernel weight, and yield (Yd) which resulted in detection of 201 significant (p value < 10) and 61 highly significant associations (p value < 1.45 × 10). More importantly, chromosomes 1B and 2A carried loci linked to Yd in two different seasons, and an increase of up to 8.20% is possible in Yd by positive allele mining. We identified seven lines with > 4 positive alleles for Yd whose pedigree carried Aegilops squarrosa as one of the parents providing evidence that Aegilops species, apart from imparting resistance against biotic stresses, may also provide alleles for yield enhancement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13353-020-00593-1DOI Listing
February 2021

Mapping of QTLs Associated with Yield and Yield Related Traits in Durum Wheat ( Desf.) Under Irrigated and Drought Conditions.

Int J Mol Sci 2020 Mar 30;21(7). Epub 2020 Mar 30.

Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Corrensstr. 3, Seeland OT, 06466 Gatersleben, Germany.

Global durum wheat consumption ( Desf.) is ahead of its production. One reason for this is abiotic stress, e.g., drought. Breeding for resistance to drought is complicated by the lack of fast, reproducible screening techniques and the inability to routinely create defined and repeatable water stress conditions. Here, we report the first analysis of dissection of yield and yield-related traits in durum wheat in Pakistan, seeking to elucidate the genetic components of yield and agronomic traits. Analysis of several traits revealed a total of 221 (160 with logarithm of odds (LOD) > 2 ≤ 3 and 61 with LOD > 3) quantitative trait loci (QTLs) distributed on all fourteen durum wheat chromosomes, of which 109 (78 with LOD > 2 ≤ 3 and 31 with LOD > 3) were observed in 2016-17 (S1) and 112 (82 with LOD > 2 ≤ 3 and 30 with LOD > 3) were observed in 2017-18 (S2). Allelic profiles of yield QTLs on chromosome 2A and 7B indicate that allele A of and allele B of can enhance the Yd up to 6.16% in control and 5.27% under drought. Moreover, if combined, a yield gain of up to 11% would be possible.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms21072372DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7177892PMC
March 2020

Mapping of QTL associated with seed longevity in durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.).

J Appl Genet 2019 Feb 9;60(1):33-36. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Corrensstr. 3, 06466 Seeland OT, Gatersleben, Germany.

Regeneration cycle of seeds kept at genebanks is determined by seed longevity. Information about longevity of species is important for storage periods, germination test intervals, and reproduction cycles. Seed longevity is different between species and depends on the storage conditions. It also differs between genotypes of a species providing the basis of genetic analyses of seed longevity. Studies in hexaploid wheat and barley have identified numerous quantitative trait locus (QTL) linked to the trait. Seed longevity in durum wheat, however, has not been attempted so far. Here, we present the first report of genetic analysis of grain longevity in durum wheat using a bi-parental mapping population composed of 114 recombinant inbred lines. QTL analysis identified three highly significant and one significant QTL for initial germination (on chromosomes 4B, 5A (2 QTL), and 6B), three significant QTL for germination after accelerated aging treatment (on chromosomes 5A and 7B (2 QTL)), and five significant QTL determining relative germination and distributed on chromosomes 3A, 3B, 5A, 6B, and 7B. This study confirms the results of previous investigations in bread wheat and provides a baseline for further research in durum wheat.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13353-018-0477-yDOI Listing
February 2019

Genetic architecture of seed longevity in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

J Biosci 2017 Mar;42(1):81-89

Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Gatersleben, Germany.

The deterioration in the quality of ex situ conserved seed over time reflects a combination of both physical and chemical changes. Intraspecific variation for longevity is, at least in part, under genetic control. Here, the grain of 183 bread wheat accessions maintained under low-temperature storage at the IPK-Gatersleben genebank over some decades have been tested for their viability, along with that of fresh grain subjected to two standard artificial ageing procedures. A phenotype-genotype association analysis, conducted to reveal the genetic basis of the observed variation between accessions, implicated many regions of the genome, underling the genetic complexity of the trait. Some, but not all, of these regions were associated with variation for both natural and experimental ageing, implying some non-congruency obtains between these two forms of testing for longevity. The genes underlying longevity appear to be independent of known genes determining dormancy and pre-harvest sprouting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12038-016-9661-6DOI Listing
March 2017

The inheritance of wheat grain longevity: a comparison between induced and natural ageing.

J Appl Genet 2016 Nov 16;57(4):477-481. Epub 2016 Apr 16.

Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Corrensstr. 3, 06466, Stadt Seeland, OT Gatersleben, Germany.

Seed longevity is an important trait for both ex situ genebanks and the seed industry. It is partially determined by genetic factors, but is also dependent on the environmental conditions experienced by the mother plant during seed maturation, as well as those imposed during the post-harvest and storage periods. For practical reasons, the variation in longevity has repeatedly been analysed by treating fresh seed to various induced ageing protocols, but the extent to which these procedures mimic the natural ageing process remains debatable. Here, a comparison was attempted between the wheat genomic regions identified by biparental mapping as harbouring determinants of viability loss identified in grain which had been either aged artificially or had been stored long term. Only one locus proved to be shared, but even here, the parental origin of the positive allele differed. Correlation analysis revealed no relationship between various induced ageing treatments and long-term storage.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13353-016-0348-3DOI Listing
November 2016

Molecular markers in management of ex situ PGR-a case study.

J Biosci 2012 Nov;37(5):871-7

Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Corrensstrasse 3 06466 Gatersleben, Germany.

Worldwide germplasm collections contain about 7.4 million accessions of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture. One of the 10 largest ex situ genebanks of our globe is located at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research in Gatersleben, Germany. Molecular tools have been used for various gene bank management practices including characterization and utilization of the germplasm. The results on genetic integrity of longterm- stored gene bank accessions of wheat (self-pollinating) and rye (open-pollinating) cereal crops revealed a high degree of identity for wheat. In contrast, the out-pollinating accessions of rye exhibited shifts in allele frequencies. The genetic diversity of wheat and barley germplasm collected at intervals of 40 to 50 years in comparable geographical regions showed qualitative rather than a quantitative change in diversity. The inter- and intraspecific variation of seed longevity was analysed and differences were detected. Genetic studies in barley, wheat and oilseed rape revealed numerous QTL, indicating the complex and quantitative nature of seed longevity. Some of the loci identified were in genomic regions that co-localize with genes determining agronomic traits such as spike architecture or biotic and abiotic stress response. Finally, a genome-wide association mapping analysis of a core collection of wheat for flowering time was performed using diversity array technology (DArT) markers. Maker trait associations were detected in genomic regions where major genes or QTL have been described earlier. In addition, new loci were also detected, providing opportunities to monitor genetic variation for crop improvement.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12038-012-9250-2DOI Listing
November 2012