Publications by authors named "Meryl Ludwig"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Single-event multilevel surgery in cerebral palsy: Value added by a co-surgeon.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2021 Jun;100(24):e26294

National Academy of Medicine Fellowship, American Osteopathic Association, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract: The aim of this study was to compare outcomes for single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) in cerebral palsy (CP) performed by 1 or 2 attending surgeons.A retrospective review of patients with CP undergoing SEMLS was performed. Patients undergoing SEMLS performed by a single senior surgeon were compared with patients undergoing SEMLS by the same senior surgeon and a consistent second attending surgeon. Due to heterogeneity of the type and quantity of SEMLS procedures included in this study, a scoring system was utilized to stratify patients to low and high surgical burden. The SEMLS events scoring less than 18 points were categorized as low burden surgery and SEMLS scoring 18 or more points were categorized as high burden surgery. Operative time, estimated blood loss, hospital length of stay, and operating room (OR) utilization costs were compared.In low burden SEMLS, 10 patients had SEMLS performed by a single surgeon and 8 patients had SEMLS performed by 2 surgeons. In high burden SEMLS, 10 patients had SEMLS performed by a single surgeon and 12 patients had SEMLS performed by 2 surgeons. For high burden SEMLS, operative time was decreased by a mean of 69 minutes in cases performed by 2 co-surgeons (P = 0.03). Decreased operative time was associated with an estimated savings of $2484 per SEMLS case. In low burden SEMLS, a trend toward decreased operative time was associated for cases performed by 2 co-surgeons (182 vs 221 minutes, P = 0.11). Decreased operative time was associated with an estimated savings of $1404 per low burden SEMLS case. No difference was found for estimated blood loss or hospital length of stay between groups in high and low burden SEMLS.Employing 2 attending surgeons in SEMLS decreased operative time and OR utilization cost, particularly in patients with a high surgical burden. These findings support the practice of utilizing 2 attending surgeons for SEMLS in patients with CP.Level of Evidence: Level III.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000026294DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8213317PMC
June 2021

Osteogenesis Imperfecta.

Del Med J 2016 Jun;88(6):178-85

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2016

Intramedullary Nailing of Open Tibial Fractures: Provisional Plate Fixation.

Orthopedics 2016 Sep 1;39(5):e931-6. Epub 2016 Jul 1.

Tibia fracture is the most common type of long bone fracture, and intramedullary nailing is the preferred treatment. In open fractures, a provisional plate is often used to maintain reduction. It is unknown whether this practice increases the risk of infection or other complications. This study retrospectively compared patients who were treated at a level 1 trauma center with intramedullary nailing of an open tibia fracture. Patients who were included: (1) were 18 years or older; (2) were treated between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2013; (3) had an open fracture of the tibia; and (4) were treated operatively with intramedullary nailing, with or without provisional plate fixation. Patient sex, history of diabetes, history of smoking, mechanism of injury, and side of injury were analyzed. Postoperative complications included infection, delayed union or non-union, compartment syndrome, and death. After the authors controlled for age, Gustilo-Anderson type, and AO/Orthopaedic Trauma Association classification, they found that provisional plate use did not significantly increase the risk of infection (adjusted odds ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-5.32; P=.41) or any other complications (adjusted odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.46-3.35; P=.67). In the subgroup of patients who had a provisional plate (n=35), removal of the plate did not significantly decrease the risk of infection (adjusted odds ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.07-2.69; P=.36) or other complications (adjusted odds ratio, 0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-2.46; P=.44). In open tibia fractures treated with intramedullary nailing, provisional plate stabilization, a valuable reduction aid, did not increase the risk of infection or other complications. Because of the small subgroup size, however, definitive conclusions cannot be drawn about removal of these provisional plates. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e931-e936.].
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01477447-20160623-08DOI Listing
September 2016

Management of anterior cruciate ligament tears in skeletally immature athletes.

Phys Sportsmed 2015 Nov 31;43(4):440-7. Epub 2015 Aug 31.

b 2 Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children , Wilmington, DE 19803, USA.

The prevalence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in skeletally immature athletes has increased dramatically over the past decade. Many attribute this to increased training, single-sport specialization and year-round competitive play. ACL injuries most commonly occur in athletic activities that involve cutting, pivoting, jumping and landing. Non-operative treatment consisting of activity modification, physical therapy and specialized bracing may have a role; however, recent data suggest that this may not be optimal in young, active patients. Surgical treatment has become more favorable, specifically for athletes with aspirations of higher-level sports participation. To minimize growth plate disturbances and potential for limb malalignment, the patient's skeletal age, pubertal status and remaining growth potential must be taken into consideration. We provide a review on how to evaluate, manage and treat the skeletally immature athlete with an ACL injury.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00913847.2015.1084213DOI Listing
November 2015

Intraoperative evaluation of dorsal screw prominence after polyaxial volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures utilizing the Hoya view: a cadaveric study.

Hand (N Y) 2014 Dec;9(4):511-5

The CORE Institute, 18444 North 25th Ave, Phoenix, AZ 85023 USA.

Background: The irregular nature of the dorsal surface of the distal radius makes it difficult to detect prominent screws with volar plate fixation for distal radius fractures using standard fluoroscopic images. This study evaluates the accuracy of a new radiographic method, the Hoya view, for the assessment of dorsal cortical screw penetration with volar plate fixation.

Methods: Eight cadaveric upper extremities underwent application of a volar distal radius plate with polyaxial locking screws placed distally. Utilizing a mini C-arm, lateral and Hoya views were obtained with notation of any dorsal cortical screw prominence. Dissection of the cadavers was then performed for direct visualization of screw prominence. The screws were then exchanged sequentially for screws 2-mm longer than their initial measurements with repeated imaging and direct visualization.

Results: The Hoya view revealed that 9.4 % of the screws penetrated the dorsal cortex with an average screw prominence of 1.08 mm (range 0.5-2 mm). None of the six prominent screws were detected with lateral views. With the Hoya view, six of six prominent screws were identified. With locking screws exchanged for screws 2-mm longer, 76.6 % of the screws had violated the dorsal cortex; of these, 24.5 % were detected with lateral imaging versus 100 % with the Hoya view.

Conclusions: This study supports the intraoperative use of the Hoya view to evaluate screw length and dorsal cortical screw penetration in volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures. However, this view may be difficult to obtain in patients with limitations in elbow or shoulder range of motion.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11552-014-9616-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4235922PMC
December 2014
-->