Publications by authors named "Meryem Gülce Subaşı"

14 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of thermocycling on the surface properties of resin-matrix CAD-CAM ceramics after different surface treatments.

J Mech Behav Biomed Mater 2021 05 18;117:104401. Epub 2021 Feb 18.

Department of Reconstructive Dentistry and Gerodontology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Department of Restorative, Preventive and Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; Division of Restorative and Prosthetic Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Ohio, USA.

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of thermocycling on the water contact angle (WCA), surface roughness (SR), and microhardness (MH) of resin-matrix computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) ceramics after different surface treatments (conventional polishing or 2 different surface sealants).

Material And Methods: Two different types of resin-matrix CAD-CAM ceramics; a nanoparticle-filled resin (CeraSmart; CS) and a resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate; LU) were tested. Rectangular-shaped plates (1 mm-thick) were divided into 3 groups (n = 8) in terms of surface treatment methods applied: conventional polishing (control) or 2 surface sealants (Optiglaze (OG) and Palaseal (PS)). Scanning electron microscope images ( × 1000 and × 700 magnifications) of each material were taken from 2 additional specimens before surface treatments. After surface treatments, WCAs of deionized water, SR, and MH values of specimens were measured. All specimens were subjected to 5000 thermocycling and measurements were repeated. SR, WCA, and MH data before and after thermocycling were compared by using a 2-way ANOVA (α=.05).

Results: A significant interaction was found between the surface treatment and the material for WCA after thermocycling (P < .001), for SR before thermocycling (P = .014), and for MH both before and after thermocycling (P < .001). SEM images before surface treatments revealed that the surface of CS was mechanically rougher with a more microretentive topography compared with the surface of LU. No significant correlation was found between SR and WCA (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: Thermocycling affected the SR, MH, and WCA of all resin-matrix CAD-CAM ceramics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2021.104401DOI Listing
May 2021

Clinical factors affecting the translucency of monolithic Y-TZP ceramics.

Odontology 2020 Oct 10;108(4):526-531. Epub 2019 Aug 10.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Kutahya Health Sciences University, Evliya Celebi Yerleskesi, 43270, Kutahya, Turkey.

The use of monolithic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramics in aesthetically critical regions is questionable because of the insufficient translucency and opacity of the restorations. Intrinsic (manufacturing process) and extrinsic factors (laboratory procedures and clinical factors) can affect the translucency of monolithic zirconia. In this narrative review, the clinical factors (thickness, cementation type, colour of the monolithic zirconia, surface finishing methods and wear, dental background, cement colour, low temperature degradation) affecting the translucency of monolithic Y-TZP ceramics were reported.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10266-019-00446-2DOI Listing
October 2020

Effects of fabrication and shading technique on the color and translucency of new-generation translucent zirconia after coffee thermocycling.

J Prosthet Dent 2018 Oct 25;120(4):603-608. Epub 2018 May 25.

Associate Professor, Division of Restorative Science and Prosthodontics, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Columbus, Ohio.

Statement Of Problem: The color stability and translucency of preshaded and externally shaded monolithic and veneered new generation translucent zirconia are not well known.

Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of fabrication (veneered or monolithic) and shading (preshaded or externally shaded) techniques on the color and relative translucency of translucent zirconia after coffee thermocycling.

Material And Methods: Specimens of different thicknesses (0.5 mm for veneered and 1.5 mm for monolithic) were sectioned from preshaded and externally shaded translucent zirconia. Externally shaded specimens were colored by using the dipping technique. Externally shaded (Ext Mono) and preshaded (Pre Mono) monolithic zirconia specimens were sintered and glazed. Externally shaded (Ext Vene) and preshaded (Pre Vene) 0.5-mm-thick specimens were sintered, veneered with feldspathic porcelain (1 mm), and glazed. The color coordinates of specimens were measured with a spectroradiometer before and after 10 000 thermocycles in coffee solution. Color differences were calculated using CIEDE2000, and relative translucency parameter (RTP) values were calculated using the RTP formula. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the CIEDE2000 color differences and RTP values (α=.05).

Results: Shading technique had a significant effect on the color difference values (P=.018). For the translucency data, the 3-way ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between the fabrication technique and shading technique (P=.002). Each pair of material subgroups within each combination of fabrication technique and shading technique was found to have a significantly different RTP, except between Ext Vene and Pre Vene (P=.115).

Conclusions: Externally shaded translucent zirconia had a greater color change in coffee than the preshaded translucent zirconia, either in monolithic or veneered form. Fabrication technique significantly affected the RTP, and the monolithic zirconia was more translucent than the veneered zirconia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prosdent.2018.01.018DOI Listing
October 2018

Effect of different resin cements and surface treatments on the shear bond strength of ceramic-glass polymer materials.

J Prosthet Dent 2018 Sep 30;120(3):454-461. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Associate Professor, Division of Restorative Sciences and Prosthodontics, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Columbus, Ohio.

Statement Of Problem: The effect of different surface treatment techniques on the bond strength of different types of ceramic-glass polymer computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) materials and resin cements after aging is unknown.

Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of different ceramic-glass polymer CAD-CAM materials after 2 different surface treatments and the effect of material, surface treatment, resin cement, and aging on bond strength. Additionally, it was to determine any correlation between the surface roughness and bond strength.

Material And Methods: CAD-CAM ceramic-glass polymer materials, a polymer-infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) (VITA ENAMIC), a resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate), and a nanoparticle-filled resin (Cerasmart) (1.5 mm in thickness; n=144) were divided into 2 subgroups in terms of surface treatments: airborne-particle abraded or silica-coated. The surface roughness values of specimens were measured. Composite resin cylinders were prepared and bonded to the restorative specimens using 2 different types of resin cements (dual-polymerizing [DP] and light-polymerizing [LP]). Half of the specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours, while the other half were submitted to 5000 thermocycles. The shear bond strength was measured, and the failure modes of the specimens were evaluated. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (α=.05). The correlation between roughness and bond strength values was analyzed using Pearson correlation analysis.

Results: Material (P=.012) and surface treatment type (P=.031) significantly affected the surface roughness. For bond strength, significant interactions were found among the material type, surface treatment, resin cement, and aging factors (P=.009). No significant correlation was found between roughness and bond strength (P=.943).

Conclusions: The surface treatment and resin cement type affected the bond strength and surface roughness of tested restorative materials. DP resin cement provided higher bond strength for airborne-particle abraded nanohybrid composite resin materials. LP resin cement achieved a higher bond strength when used with silica-coated, nanoparticle-filled resin and PICN materials.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prosdent.2017.12.016DOI Listing
September 2018

Effect of shading technique and thickness on color stability and translucency of new generation translucent zirconia.

J Dent 2018 06 27;73:19-23. Epub 2018 Mar 27.

Division of Restorative Science and Prosthodontics, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, 305 W12th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, United States. Electronic address:

Objective: To evaluate the effect of shading technique and thickness on the color stability and translucency of translucent zirconia after coffee thermocycling.

Methods: Specimens in different thicknesses (1; 1.5; 2 mm) (n = 4 for each thickness) were sectioned from translucent preshaded zirconia (Pre) and externally shaded zirconia (Ext). After sintering, specimens were glazed and subjected to 10,000 thermocycling in coffee solution. The color coordinates of specimens were measured with a spectroradiometer before and after coffee thermocyling. Color differences and relative translucency parameter (RTP) values were calculated with CIEDE2000 color difference and TP formulas. ANOVA was used to analyze the CIEDE2000 color difference and RTP values (α = 0.05).

Results: According to 2-way ANOVA, no significant effect of shading technique and thickness on the color difference values was found (P > .05). According to 3-way ANOVA, a significant interaction between the shading technique and thickness (P < .0001) was found for RTP. The RTP parameter decreased with the increase in the thickness. Ext specimens presented significantly higher RTP than Pre specimens (P < .0001), except for between Ext 1 mm and Pre 1 mm (P = .179).

Conclusions: Neither shading technique nor tested thicknesses affected the color of translucent zirconia. Shading technique and thickness affected the RTP of translucent zirconia. The RTP was inversely affected with the thickness of the material. Externally shaded zirconia presented higher RTP than preshaded zirconia for specimens thicker than 1 mm.

Clinical Significance: Discoloration with coffee was insignificant for the tested translucent zirconia in tested thicknesses (1, 1.5, 2 mm). When a translucent restoration is intended, thinner externally shaded translucent zirconia restorations should be preferred instead of preshaded translucent zirconia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2018.03.011DOI Listing
June 2018

Effect of surface treatments and coffee thermocycling on the color and translucency of CAD-CAM monolithic glass-ceramic.

J Prosthet Dent 2018 Aug 15;120(2):263-268. Epub 2018 Mar 15.

Associate Professor, Division of Restorative Science and Prosthodontics, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, Columbus, Ohio. Electronic address:

Statement Of Problem: The effects of surface treatments and coffee thermocycling on the color and relative translucency of a recently introduced computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) monolithic glass-ceramic are unknown.

Purpose: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of coffee thermocycling on the color and relative translucency parameter (RTP) of CAD-CAM monolithic glass-ceramics after different surface treatments.

Material And Methods: Specimens (1.5-mm-thick) were sectioned from zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate glass-ceramic (ZLS) (n=18) and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (LDS) blocks (n=18). Two different types of surface treatments (glazing or polishing) were applied to the specimens. The specimens were subjected to 5000 thermocycles in a coffee solution. The color coordinates of specimens were measured before and after coffee thermocycling by using a spectroradiometer, and color differences and relative translucency values were calculated by using CIEDE2000 color difference and RTP formulas. ANOVA was used to analyze the color difference and relative translucency values by using maximum likelihood estimation and the Satterthwaite degrees of freedom methods. Any significant interaction between surface subgroups was further analyzed by using the Tukey-Kramer adjustment (α=.05).

Results: Material type had a significant effect on color difference (P=.018). All color difference values of all materials were smaller than the clinical acceptability threshold (<1.8 units). For relative translucency, material (P<.001) and coffee thermocycling had a significant effect (P=.014), and an interaction was found between the surface treatments and materials (P<.001). The Tukey-Kramer test revealed significant differences between glazed and polished subgroups of LDS material, except for ZLS-glazed and ZLS-polished subgroups.

Conclusions: Different surface treatments of CAD-CAM monolithic zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate and lithium disilicate glass-ceramics resulted in clinically acceptable color changes after coffee thermocycling. The color changes in all groups, except for LDS-polished, were not perceivable. Lithium disilicate was more translucent than zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate before and after coffee thermocycling. Coffee thermocycling decreased the translucency of both of the materials. Different surface treatments affected the translucency of only lithium disilicate for tested thickness.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.prosdent.2017.10.024DOI Listing
August 2018

Effect of thickness on optical properties of monolithic CAD-CAM ceramics.

J Dent 2018 04 31;71:38-42. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

Division of General Practice and Materials Science, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, 305 W12th Ave Columbus, OH, 43210, United States. Electronic address:

Objective: To compare the effect of material and thickness on the color stability and relative translucency parameters (RTP) for monolithic ceramics subjected to coffee thermocycling.

Methods: Four specimens each at thicknesses of 0.5, 0,7 and 1 mm were sectioned from monolithic ceramics [preshaded monolithic zirconia (MonZr), lithium disilicate (LDS) and zirconia reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS)]. The specimens were glazed and subjected to 5000 coffee thermocycling. The color coordinates of specimens were determined with a spectroradiometer and color differences and RTP values were calculated with CIEDE2000 color difference and TP formulas. ANOVA was used to analyze CIEDE2000 color difference and RTP values (α = .05).

Results: For the color difference data, the 2-way ANOVA revealed a significant interaction between material and different thickness (P = .002). Except for 0.5 mm thick ZLS material, all materials in all thicknesses studied presented color changes within the clinically acceptable limits after coffee thermocycling. For the RTP data, the 3-way ANOVA revealed a highly significant interaction between material and different thicknesses (P < .001).

Conclusions: Material type and thickness can be expected to affect color change and relative translucency of the restorations made with preshaded MonZr, LDS and ZLS materials. Except for 0.5 mm thick ZLS material, color changes of all studied materials were within the clinically acceptable limits. Except ZLS material, color changes of other materials were not significantly affected by thickness. Staining in coffee was not found to affect translucency, and the materials' translucency parameters were ranked from high to low as LDS, ZLS and MonZr at each thickness studied.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdent.2018.01.010DOI Listing
April 2018

Repair bond strengths of non-aged and aged resin nanoceramics.

J Adv Prosthodont 2017 Oct 16;9(5):364-370. Epub 2017 Oct 16.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Okan University, Istanbul, Turkey.

Purpose: To explore the influence of different surface conditionings on surface changes and the influence of surface treatments and aging on the bond strengths of composites to non-aged and aged resin nanoceramics.

Materials And Methods: Rectangular-shaped non-aged and aged (5000 thermocycles) resin nanoceramic specimens (Lava Ultimate) (n=63, each) were divided into 3 groups according to surface treatments (untreated, air abrasion, or silica coating) (n=21). The surface roughness was measured and scanning electron microscopy was used to examine one specimen from each group. Afterwards, the specimens were repaired with a composite resin (Filtek Z550) and half were sent for aging (5000 thermocycles, n=10, each). Shear bond strengths and failure types were evaluated. Roughness and bond strength were investigated by two- and three-way analysis of variance, respectively. The correlation between the roughness and bond strength was investigated by Pearson's correlation test.

Results: Surface-treated samples had higher roughness compared with the untreated specimens (=.000). For the non-aged resin nanoceramic groups, aging was a significant factor for bond strength; for the aged resin nanoceramic groups, surface treatment and aging were significant factors. The failures were mostly adhesive after thermal cycling, except in the non-aged untreated group and the aged air-abraded group, which had mostly mixed failures. Roughness and bond strength were positively correlated (=.003).

Conclusion: Surface treatment is not required for the repair of non-aged resin nanoceramic; for the repair of aged resin nanoceramic restorations, air abrasion is recommended.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4047/jap.2017.9.5.364DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5673613PMC
October 2017

Color Stability of Composites After Short-term Oral Simulation: An Study.

Open Dent J 2016 31;10:431-437. Epub 2016 Aug 31.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, İstanbul Kemerburgaz University, İstanbul, Turkey.

Background: Although most of the studies investigated color stability of different restorative materials, evaluation of color stability of composites after immersion in multiple beverages in the same day by an oral simulation study is unclear.

Objective: To assess color change of different restorative materials at the end of days 1, 14, and 30 of immersion in multiple liquid types to mimic the oral environment .

Method: Ten disc-shaped specimens were made from each of four different resin composites (Filtek Z250, Voco x-tra base, Beautifil Flow Plus, Beautifil II). Baseline color value of each sample was measured using a spectrophotometer. Each composite was respectively immersed in coffee, an orange/pomegranate juice mixture, black tea, and a mouth rinse on the same day to mimic daily liquid consumption of individuals. Color measurements were taken after 1, 14, and 30 days by spectrophotometer and color change values were calculated. Statistical analyses were executed by one-way ANOVA/Tukey HSD and repeated-measures ANOVA.

Results: All materials showed significant color change after 1, 14, and 30 days ( < 0.01) of immersion in liquids, with the lowest color alteration observed at the 1 day and the highest observed after the 30 day. Among the materials tested, at each time point (1, 14, and 30 days), the lowest color alteration was detected in Filtek Z250 and the highest color alteration was detected in Beautifil II.

Conclusion: Color alteration of composite resins is affected by composite type and storage time. With the exception of 1 day of storage, color changes of all materials were substantial and clinically unacceptable.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874210601610010431DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5040758PMC
August 2016

Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Partial Ear Defect: 2 Case Reports.

J Indian Prosthodont Soc 2014 Dec 6;14(Suppl 1):196-201. Epub 2013 Jan 6.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey.

The loss or absence of an auricle may result from trauma, disease or congenital anomalies and causes a considerable aesthetic problem. If the deformity involves the external auditory canal, it can affect hearing. This case report describes the surgical and prosthetic treatment of two patients with partial defects of their right external ears from different causes. Implant-retained auricular prostheses fabricated from heat-temperature-vulcanised silicone were used in both the cases; they were designed to be harmonious with the remaining tissues. The patients experienced improved retention, aesthetics, hearing and quality of life with these prostheses. During the approximately 3 year follow-up, both the prostheses were re-fabricated once; however, problems related to implant stability and peri-implant tissue health were not encountered.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13191-012-0251-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4502015PMC
December 2014

Mechanical properties of zirconia after different surface treatments and repeated firings.

J Adv Prosthodont 2014 Dec 17;6(6):462-7. Epub 2014 Dec 17.

Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Selcuk University, Konya, Turkey.

Purpose: This study investigated the influence of surface conditioning procedures and repeated firings on monoclinic content and strength of zirconia before cementation.

Materials And Methods: Sintered bar-shaped zirconia specimens were subjected to no surface treatment (control), air abrasion, or grinding (n=21). Their roughness was evaluated using a profilometer, and microscope analysis was performed on one specimen of each group. Then, 2 or 10 repeated firings (n=10) were executed, the monoclinic content of specimens was analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and a three-point flexural strength test was performed. Surface roughness values were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey honestly significant difference (HSD) tests, the monoclinic content values were tested using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests, and the flexural strength values were tested using two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (P=.05). Spearman's correlation test was performed to define relationships among measured parameters.

Results: Surface-treated specimens were rougher than untreated specimens and had a higher monoclinic content (P<.005), and the relationship between roughness and monoclinic content was significant (P<.000). Neither surface treatment nor firing significantly affected the flexural strength, but Weibull analysis showed that for the air-abraded samples the characteristic strength was significantly lower after the 10(th) firing than after the 2(nd) firing.

Conclusion: After firing, a negligible amount of monoclinic content remained on the zirconia surfaces, and rougher surfaces had higher monoclinic contents than untreated surfaces. Multiple firings could be performed if necessary, but the fracture probability could increase after multiple firings for rougher surfaces.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4047/jap.2014.6.6.462DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4279044PMC
December 2014

Influence of surface treatments and resin cement selection on bonding to zirconia.

Lasers Med Sci 2014 Jan 9;29(1):19-27. Epub 2012 Nov 9.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Aydın University, İstanbul, Turkey,

This study aimed to evaluate the surface changes caused in zirconia by different surface treatments and the influence of the surface treatment and cement selection on bonding to zirconia under aging. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into five groups (n = 31) based on the surface treatment, namely, control, air abrasion, silica coating, laser and air abrasion + laser. After surface treatment, surface roughness and microscope analyses were performed on one specimen of each group. Composite cylinders were then bonded to conditioned ceramics using RelyX U100 (RXU), Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC) and Panavia F (PF) (n = 10). After 24 h, the bonded specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (6,000 times), and then, a shear bond strength test was conducted. The roughness values were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests, and the bond strengths were analysed by two-way analysis of variance and Duncan's test. The relationship between the roughness and the bond strength was determined by Spearman's correlation analysis. Specimens subjected to surface treatments were rougher than the control specimen (p < 0.000). However, there were no significant differences between the air abrasion and air abrasion + laser groups and the silica coating and laser groups. Specimens treated with laser showed lower bond strengths irrespective of the resin cement used. CEC and/or PF showed higher bond strengths than RXU for each surface treatment group. No significant relationship was observed between the roughness and the bond strength. The results of this study showed that all the surface treatments, except for laser irradiation, were suitable for treating zirconia ceramics. Cement selection was found to be more important than surface treatment, and phosphate monomer-containing cements were suitable for cementing zirconia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-012-1221-1DOI Listing
January 2014

Amelogenesis imperfecta and generalized gingival overgrowth resembling hereditary gingival fibromatosis in siblings: a case report.

Case Rep Dent 2012 9;2012:428423. Epub 2012 Oct 9.

Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Kocaeli University, Kocaeli, Turkey.

Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of hereditary disorders primarily characterized by developmental abnormalities in the quantity and/or quality of enamel. There are some reports suggesting an association between AI and generalized gingival enlargement. This paper describes the clinical findings and oral management of two siblings presenting both AI and hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) like generalized gingival enlargements. The treatment of gingival enlargements by periodontal flap surgery was successful in the management of the physiologic gingival form for both patients in the 3-year follow-up period. Prosthetic treatment was also satisfactory for the older patient both aesthetically and functionally.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/428423DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3474234PMC
October 2012

Evaluation of the topographical surface changes and roughness of zirconia after different surface treatments.

Lasers Med Sci 2012 Jul 24;27(4):735-42. Epub 2011 Jul 24.

Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Selcuk University, Kampus, Konya, Turkey.

The purpose of this study was to investigate the surface morphology and roughness of zirconia after different surface treatments. Eighty sintered zirconia specimens were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the surface treatments received: no treatment, erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser irradiation (400 mJ, 10 Hz, 4 W, 100 MPS, distance: 1 mm), tribochemical silica coating with 30 μm aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) modified by silica, and air abrasion with 110 μm Al(2)O(3) particles. After the surface treatments, the surface roughness (Ra in μm) of the specimens was evaluated using a surface texture measuring instrument. Surface morphology of a specimen from each group was evaluated with atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses. The surface roughness values were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests (p = 0.05). All of the surface treatments produced rougher surfaces than the control group (p < 0.005). While there were no significant differences between the surface roughness of laser and silica groups (p > 0.05). SEM and AFM analyses revealed changes in surface topography after surface treatments, especially in the laser group with the formation of rare pits and in the silica and air abrasion groups with the formation of microretentive grooves. According to the results of the statistical and microscopic analyses, all of the surface treatments can be used for roughening zirconia prior to cementation; however, air abrasion is the most effective surface treatment to obtain micromechanical retention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10103-011-0965-3DOI Listing
July 2012