Publications by authors named "Mervi A Puska"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Degree of conversion and leached monomers of urethane dimethacrylate-hydroxypropyl methacrylate-based dental resin systems.

J Oral Sci 2016 ;58(1):15-22

Dental Materials Science, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong.

The degree of conversion (DC) and monomer leaching of three experimental urethane dimethacrylate (UEDMA)-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA)-based resin systems were studied. Three experimental resins (E1: 70.6 wt% UEDMA + 27.4 wt% HPMA, E2: 80.6 wt% UEDMA + 17.4 wt% HPMA, E3: 90.6 wt% UEDMA + 7.4 wt% HPMA) and one control resin [C: 70.6 wt% bis-phenol A glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) + 27.4 wt% methyl methacrylate (MMA)] were prepared. For the DC test, cylindrical specimens [1.5 mm (h) × 6 mm (d)] were scanned with an ATR-FTIR instrument before and after light-curing (n = 5). For the monomer leaching test, block-shaped specimens [5.67 mm (l) × 2.00 mm (w) × 2.00 mm (h)] were light-cured (n = 6), stored in a 75% ethanol:water solution for 3 days, and then analyzed with HPLC. The UEDMA-HPMA-based experimental groups showed higher DC (62-78%) than the bis-GMA-MMA-based control group (58-66%), and the DC decreased as the UEDMA content increased (P < 0.05). Amongst the four groups, E3 exhibited the lowest leaching of both mono methacrylate (0.1% HPMA) and dimethacrylate (<0.043% UEDMA) monomers after 30 or 40 s of curing. The UEDMA-HPMA-based resins, therefore, exhibited higher DC and less monomer leaching compared to the bis-GMA-MMA-based resin. (J Oral Sci 58, 15-22, 2016).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2334/josnusd.58.15DOI Listing
March 2017

Reconstruction of critical size calvarial bone defects in rabbits with glass-fiber-reinforced composite with bioactive glass granule coating.

J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2008 Feb;84(2):510-9

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Biomaterials Science, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

Unlabelled: The aim of this study was to evaluate glass-fiber-reinforced composite as a bone reconstruction material in the critical size defects in rabbit calvarial bones. The bone defect healing process and inflammatory reactions were evaluated histologically at 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively. Possible neuropathological effects on brain tissue were evaluated. The release of residual monomers from the fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC).

Results: At 4 weeks postoperatively, fibrous connective tissue ingrowth to implant structures was seen. Healing had started as new bone formation from defect margins, as well as woven bone islets in the middle of the defect. Woven bone was also seen inside the implant. Inflammation reaction was slight. At 12 weeks, part of the new bone had matured to lamellar-type, and inflammation reaction was slight to moderate. Control defects had healed by fibrous connective tissue. Histological examinations of the brain revealed no obvious damage to brain morphology. In HPLC analysis, the release of residual 1,4-butanedioldimethacrylate and methylmethacrylate from polymerized FRC was low.

Conclusions: This FRC-implant was shown to promote the healing process of critical size calvarial bone defect in rabbits. After some modifications to the material properties, this type of implant has the potential to become an alternative for the reconstruction of bone defects in the head and neck area in the future.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.b.30898DOI Listing
February 2008

Exothermal characteristics and release of residual monomers from fiber-reinforced oligomer-modified acrylic bone cement.

J Biomater Appl 2005 Jul;20(1):51-64

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry & Biomaterials Research, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Finland.

The aim of this study is to determine the peak temperature of polymerization, the setting time and the release of residual monomers of a modified acrylic bone cement. Palacos R, a commercial bone cement, is used as the main component. The cement is modified by adding short glass fibers and resorbable oligomer fillers, and an additional cross-linking monomer. The test specimens are classified according to the composition of the bone cement matrix (i.e., oligomer-filler, glass-fiber reinforcement, and/or cross-linking monomer). The exothermal characteristics during autopolymerization are analyzed using a transducer connected with a computer. The quantities of residual monomers were analyzed from different test groups using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The DeltaT value for the oligomer filler and the glass-fiber-containing acrylic bone cement is lower than that for the unmodified bone cement (2.1 +/- 0.8 vs. 23.5 +/- 4.2 degrees C). The addition of a cross-linking monomer, EGDMA, shortens the setting time of the autopolymerization of the unmodified bone cement (7.1 +/- 0.9 min vs. 3.3 +/- 0.3 min). The quantity of the residual monomers released is higher in the modified bone cement than that in the unmodified cement. The cement that contains glass fibers and oligomer fillers has a considerably lower exothermal peak, whereas the total quantity of residual monomers released is increased.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0885328205048647DOI Listing
July 2005

Residual monomers released from glass-fibre-reinforced composite photopolymerised in contact with bone and blood.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2005 Jan;16(1):15-20

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry & Biomaterials Research, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the quantity of residual monomers of glass fibre-reinforced composite released into water from the composite that had been photopolymerized in contact with bone and blood.

Materials And Methods: E-glass fibre reinforced composite (FRC) made of E-glass fibre veil and the bis-GMA-TEGDMA-PMMA resin system was used in the study. In the first group, pieces of non-polymerised FRC were photopolymerised (40 s) in air which influenced the oxygen inhibited resin layer (positive control). In the second group, the FRC was polymerized between two glass plates allowing both surfaces to be well polymerized (negative control). In the test groups, the FRC was polymerized in contact with bone or in contact with blood. FRC specimens from all four groups were incubated in three milliliters of deionised water at 37 degrees C for three days. At the end of the incubation period, the residual monomers were extracted from the water with dichloromethane, and the residual monomers of TEGDMA and bis-GMA quantitatively analysed by HPLC. The degree of monomer conversion was measured by FTIR from the surface of the test specimen. Differences between the groups were analysed using one-way ANOVA (p < 0.05).

Results: The total quantity of residual monomers released from FRC polymerized in contact with bone was lower (0.55 wt%) than in the positive control group (0.97 wt%) (p = 0.021), and only slightly exceeded that of the negative control group (0.42 wt%) (p = 0.717). The total quantity of monomers released from FRC polymerized in contact with blood was at the level of the negative control group. The main residual monomer released was TEGDMA. The surfaces of the positive and negative controls showed a clear difference between the degree of monomer conversion, 34.0 and 62.8%, respectively, when analysed with FTIR (p < 0.001).

Conclusion: The surface of the bone or contact with blood did not significantly inhibit the photoinitiated free radical polymerisation of the dimethacrylate monomer system of the FRC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-005-6441-5DOI Listing
January 2005

Release of chlorhexidine digluconate and flexural properties of glass fibre reinforced provisional fixed partial denture polymer.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2004 Dec;15(12):1349-53

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry & Biomaterials Research, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

The objective of this study was to determine the flexural properties and the release of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) of CHX laced unidirectional E-glass fibre reinforced provisional fixed partial denture polymer. Bar shaped test specimens (3.3 x 10.0 x 65.0 mm) were fabricated from provisional fixed partial denture polymer (mixture of poly[ethylmethacrylate] powder and n-poly[butyl methacrylate] monomer liquid) with E-glass fibre reinforcements. Poly(methyl methacrylate) preimpregnated continuous unidirectional glass fibre reinforcement was laced with CHX. The glass fibre reinforcements were incorporated into the polymer and the polymerised to the form of test specimens. In addition test specimens without CHX in glass fibre reinforcement were made for comparison. Control specimens did not contain glass fibres in the test specimens. Flexural strength and modulus of test specimens (n = 6) was tested with three-point bending test after storing the specimens dry or in water (two weeks). Released CHX was determined with high performance liquid chromatography during 180 days water immersion. In dry conditions, the flexural strength and the modulus of the polymer was 43 MPa and 1.7 GPa, and with glass fibre reinforcement 96 MPa and 3.5 GPa. With the reinforcement laced with CHX, the strength was 92 MPa and the modulus was 3.2 GPa. The water storage of test specimens did not weaken the reinforced polymer. The majority of the CHX released from the glass fibre reinforced polymer during the first days of storage in water. Flexural properties of provisional fixed partial denture polymer were increased using glass fibre reinforcement. The fibre reinforcement that was laced with CHX resulted in similar reinforcing effect.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-004-5744-2DOI Listing
December 2004

Flexural properties of crosslinked and oligomer-modified glass-fibre reinforced acrylic bone cement.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2004 Sep;15(9):1037-43

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Biomaterials Research, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland.

The flexural properties of oligomer-modified bone cement with various quantities of crosslinking monomer with or without glass fibre reinforcement were studied. The flexural strength and modulus of acrylic bone cement-based test specimens (N=6), including crosslinked and oligomer-modified structures with or without glass fibres, were measured in dry conditions and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for seven days (analysis with ANOVA). One test specimen from the acrylic bone cement group containing 30 wt % crosslinking monomer of its total monomer content was examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to evaluate signs of the semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN). The highest dry mean flexural strength (130 MPa) was achieved with the bone cement/crosslinking monomer/glass fibre combination containing 5 wt % crosslinking monomer of its monomer content. The highest flexural modulus (11.5 GPa) was achieved with the bone cement/crosslinking monomer/glass fibre combination containing 30 wt % crosslinking monomer of its monomer content. SBF storage decreased the flexural properties of the test specimens, as did the addition of the oligomer filler. Nevertheless, the addition of crosslinking monomer and chopped glass fibres improves considerably the mechanical properties of oligomer-modified (i.e. porosity-producing filler containing) acrylic bone cement. In addition, some signs of the semi-IPN structure were observed by SEM examination.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:JMSM.0000042690.93328.e5DOI Listing
September 2004

Mechanical properties of oligomer-modified acrylic bone cement.

Biomaterials 2003 Feb;24(3):417-25

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry & Biomaterials Research, Institute of Dentistry, University of Turku, Lemminkäisenkatu 2, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland.

The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical properties of acrylic bone cement modified with an experimental oligomer filler, based on an amino acid of trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline synthesized in the laboratory. The test specimens were tested either dry, or after being stored in distilled water or in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 1 week and then tested in distilled water. The three-point bending test was used to measure the flexural strength and flexural modulus of the cement, and the compression tests were used to measure the compression strength and modulus. One test specimen from each group was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine the nature of the oligomer filler in the polymethylmethacrylate-polymethylacrylate copolymer-based (PMMA-PMA/PMMA) polymer blend. In dry conditions, the flexural strength of the test specimens tested in air was 66 MPa, and the compression strength was 93 GPa (p<0.001) for the plain bone cement. For the test specimens including 20 wt% of oligomer filler, the flexural strength was 37 MPa, and the compression strength was 102 MPa(p<0.001) in dry conditions. The storage in wet conditions (in distilled water and the SBF) decreased the flexural strength of the test specimens with 20 wt% of oligomer filler (p<0.001) by 60% and the flexural modulus by 44% compared to the plain bone cement specimens stored in the same conditions. The reduction in compression strength in wet conditions was 32%, and that of the compression modulus was 30% (p<0.001). No significant differences were found between test specimens stored in distilled water or SBF (ANOVA, p<0.001). In the SEM examinations, random voids were observed in the oligomer-PMMA-PMA/PMMA polymer blend after water or SBF storage. The results suggest that both water and SBF storage decrease the mechanical properties of the PMMA-PMA/PMMA bone cement modified with oligomer, while at the same time, there was porous formation in the bone cement structure.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0142-9612(02)00354-xDOI Listing
February 2003