Publications by authors named "Mert Oruk"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Candida glabrata infection of a pancreatic pseudocyst in a COVID-19 patient: A case report and review of the literature.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2022 May 19;77:103648. Epub 2022 Apr 19.

Department of Surgery, Maroof International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Introduction: Pancreatic pseudocysts remain a feared complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis and are often characterized by collections of fluids due to underlying damage to the pancreatic ducts, culminating in a walled-off region bereft of an epithelial layer but surrounded by granulation tissue. While fungal infections of pancreatic pseudocysts are rarely encountered, candida albicans remains the most frequently implicated organism.

Case Presentation: A 55-year-old male presented with pain in the left-hypochondriac region, accompanied by non-bilious emesis and nausea. Interestingly, the patient also tested positive for a COVID-19 infection. Investigative workup divulged enhancing pancreatic walls with a radiologic impression consistent with a pancreatic pseudocyst. An ultrasound-guided external drainage was performed; the drainage was conducted unremarkably, with the resultant fluid collection revealing the presence of Candida Glabrata. The patient was commenced on antifungal therapy and continues to do well to date.

Discussion: Infectious ailments of pancreatic pseudocysts remain a widely known complication of acute pancreatitis. While it is rare, fungal infection is a crucial consideration for patients with pancreatic pseudocysts, especially in the context of a lack of an adequate response to antibiotics, deterioration, comorbidities, and immunocompromised states.

Conclusion: Rapid identification of the microbe responsible for pancreatic pseudocyst infection is vital for time-sensitive treatment and a more rapid recovery, curbing associated morbidity and mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2022.103648DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9142617PMC
May 2022

Recurrent appendicitis of vermiform appendix after a prior appendectomy: A case report and review of the literature.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2022 May 13;77:103603. Epub 2022 Apr 13.

Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Introduction: Acute appendicitis is one of the leading causes of acute abdominal pain and surgical emergency. Stump appendicitis is a known complication of appendectomy whereby a retained appendiceal tip serves as a nidus for recurrent bouts of inflammation. Nevertheless, full-blown appendicitis of the vermiform appendix after a prior appendectomy remains a diagnostic conundrum.

Case Presentation: A 45-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of right iliac fossa pain. Pertinently, she had undergone a prior open appendectomy twelve years ago. Further investigative workup revealed full-blown appendicitis, which was not attributable to a retained appendiceal stump. A subsequent laparoscopic appendectomy was performed, and the resultant specimen was sent for further evaluation, confirming the diagnosis of recurrent appendicitis.

Clinical Discussion: Acute appendicitis is one of the most common life-threatening abdominal surgical emergencies worldwide, with 300000 appendectomies performed annually in the United States alone. Stump and chronic appendicitis are two separate and exceedingly rare clinical entities that may present simultaneously and develop serious complications unless promptly recognized and appropriately managed. The present paper prompts the clinicians to distinguish amongst the two at the initial surgery in order to thwart further exacerbations.

Conclusion: While stump appendicitis is a rare but well-characterized complication of a prior appendectomy, full-blown appendicitis of vermiform appendix remains elusive. It is therefore imperative to distinguish between a duplicated and a recurrent appendix at the initial operative procedure to facilitate optimal patient management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2022.103603DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9142391PMC
May 2022

Effect of COVID-19 on lipid profile parameters and its correlation with acute phase reactants: A single-center retrospective analysis.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2022 Jun 26;78:103856. Epub 2022 May 26.

Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland.

Background And Objective: The development and correlation of dyslipidemia is unknown in COVID-19. This investigation was performed to assess the pathological alterations in lipid profile and their association in COVID-19.

Methods: This was a retrospective study performed on real-world patients to assess serum levels of LDL-C, HDL, TG, TC on COVID-19 patients (mild: 319; moderate: 391; critical: 357). Age- and gender-matched controls who had their lipid profiles in the same period were included as the control group.

Results: LDL-C, HDL, TG, and TC levels were significantly lower in COVID-19 patients when compared with the control group (P < 0.001, 0.047, 0.045, <0.001, respectively). All parameters decreased gradually with COVID-19 disease severity (LDL-C: median (IQR), mild: 98 (91,134); moderate: 97 (81,113); critical: 68 (68,83); HDL: mild: 45 (37,50); moderate: 46 (41,50); critical: 40 (37,46); TG: mild: 186 (150,245); moderate: 156 (109,198); critical: 111 (98,154); TC: mild: 224 (212,238); moderate: 212 (203,213); critical: 154 (125,187)). Logistic regression demonstrated lipid profile as predictor of severity of COVID-19 disease.

Conclusion: Hypolipidemia develops in increasing frequency with severe COVID-19 disease. It inversely correlates with levels of acute-phase reactants, indicating SARS-COV-2 as the causative agent for alteration in lipid and thyroid levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2022.103856DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9134795PMC
June 2022

Meckel's diverticulum causing acute intestinal obstruction: A case report and comprehensive review of the literature.

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2022 Jun 7;78:103734. Epub 2022 May 7.

Division of Gastroenterology and Liver Disease, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Introduction: Meckel's diverticulum is a congenital anomaly that is often detected incidentally. When it presents symptomatically, it causes painless gastrointestinal bleeding. Nevertheless, in rare instances, it can cause acute intestinal obstruction, often obscuring the true clinical picture.

Case Presentation: A 31-year-old male presented to the emergency department with a 24-h history of unremitting nausea, biliary emesis, abdominal distension, and absolute constipation. After ruling out the most common etiologies of acute bowel obstruction, radiological imaging was obtained and was suggestive of meckel's diverticulum. Laparoscopic meckel's diverticulectomy was performed, with the subsequent histopathological analysis confirming ectopic gastric tissue.

Discussion: Meckel's diverticulum occurs consequent to incomplete obliteration of the vitelline or omphalomesenteric duct, which connects the developing intestines to the yolk sac. It is found in roughly 2% of the population, of which only about 4% may become symptomatic due to any number of complications. Specifically, small bowel obstruction (SBO) and diverticulitis secondary to ectopic gastric or pancreatic tissue are the most common presentations of symptomatic MD.

Conclusion: Although relatively rare in adults, MD should be considered in the list of differentials in patients with intussusception leading to SBO, especially on a background history unremarkable for the most common etiologies causing SBO including post-operative adhesions and hernias.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2022.103734DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9110976PMC
June 2022
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