Publications by authors named "Meriç Yıldırım"

5 Publications

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Beliefs toward mental illness in Turkish physiotherapists.

Physiother Theory Pract 2021 Jan 21:1-7. Epub 2021 Jan 21.

School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

Physiotherapists (PTs) are responsible for the prevention and promotion of physical and mental health. Their beliefs toward mental illness (MI) are important to disclose stigmatization. To investigate the beliefs of PTs toward MI. Beliefs toward Mental Illness Scale were sent to an e-mail network of Turkish Physiotherapy Association. The scale has three subscales: 1) Dangerousness; 2) Incurability and Poor Social and Interpersonal Skills (IPSIS); and 3) Shame. Total and subscale scores were used for analysis as higher scores indicated more negative beliefs. In total, 155 PTs completed the questionnaires. The median total score was 45/105, while Dangerousness, IPSIS, and Shame scores were 20/40, 23/55, and 0/10, respectively. Dangerousness score was higher in PTs with a bachelor's degree compared to PTs with a postgraduate education ( = .049). IPSIS score was higher in PTs who did not consult a health professional in the presence of MI compared to PTs who consulted ( = .023). Total and IPSIS scores were higher in PTs exposed to an individual with MI during physiotherapy sessions compared to PTs having a family member with MI ( = .006 and = .012, respectively). Postgraduate education may affect the positivity of the beliefs regarding the dangerousness of MI. Negative beliefs about the curability of MI, frustration in interpersonal relationships, and perception that the mentally ill are untrustworthy may hinder the health-seeking behavior, even the individual is a health-care professional. Having a family member with MI may positively affect the beliefs of PTs in case of an exposure to a patient with MI during physiotherapy sessions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09593985.2020.1870251DOI Listing
January 2021

Pelvic floor muscle function and symptoms of dysfunctions in midwifes and nurses of reproductive age with and without pelvic floor dysfunction.

Taiwan J Obstet Gynecol 2019 Jul;58(4):505-513

School of Physiotherapy, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey. Electronic address:

Objectives: This study aims to compare pelvic floor muscle (PFM) functions in midwifes and nurses of reproductive age with and without pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) and investigate the relationship between PFM function and the number, type and symptoms of PFDs.

Materials And Methods: 82 midwifes and nurses of reproductive age with (n = 51) and without PFD (n = 31) participated in the study. PFM function was assessed by digital palpation using PERFECT scale. Gynecological examination, ultrasonography, disease-specific questionnaires, questions and tests were used to assess symptoms of PFD. PFD was assessed in terms of risk factors, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse (POP), pelvic pain and sexual dysfunctions.

Results: Power parameter of PERFECT scheme was significantly lower in subjects with PFD compared to Non-PFD group (p = 0.002). 41% of the subjects with Power 5 PFM strength in PFD group were diagnosed as stage 1 POP, 5.8% as stage 2 POP, 15.7% of urge incontinence, 23.3% of stress incontinence and 10.5% of mixed incontinence. Both urinary incontinence and POP were detected in 15.7% of them. Among all subjects, incontinence symptoms decreased whereas POP and sexual function did not change as PFM increased. PFM strength was negatively correlated with the number of PFD (p = 0.002, r = -0.34). The type of dysfunction did not correlate with PFM strength (p > 0.05).

Conclusion: PFM strength only affects of urinary incontinence sypmtoms among all PFDs in midwifes and nurses of reproductive age. PFM strength may not be the main factor in the occurrence of PFDs as pelvic floor does not consist solely of muscle structure. However, it strongly affects the number of dysfunctions. Therefore, PFM training should be performed to prevent the occurrence of extra dysfunctions in addition to the existing ones even if it does not alter the symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tjog.2019.05.014DOI Listing
July 2019

Falls in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis.

Authors:
Meric Yildirim

Gastroenterol Nurs 2017 Jul/Aug;40(4):306-310

Meric Yildirim, PhD, PT, is Assistant Professor, School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey.

Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important outcome for patients with liver cirrhosis as the number of transplantation candidates increases by the progression of treatment strategies. Falls and fall-related injuries are common in patients with liver cirrhosis and negatively affect HRQOL. Many factors increase the risk for falls such as minimal hepatic encephalopathy, psychoactive drugs, muscle strength, autonomic dysfunction, hyponatremia, and sleep problems. It is important to understand the underlying mechanisms for falls in cirrhotic patients to prevent severe injuries such as fractures, decrease healthcare costs, and improve HRQOL. Healthcare professionals, including physiotherapists and nurses, should be aware of the higher risk for falls in this population and therapeutic interventions must be designed for patients, especially those waiting on the transplant list.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SGA.0000000000000145DOI Listing
January 2017

Comparison of the effects of virtual reality-based balance exercises and conventional exercises on balance and fall risk in older adults living in nursing homes in Turkey.

Physiother Theory Pract 2016 6;32(3):191-201. Epub 2016 Apr 6.

b Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation , School of Health Sciences, Istanbul Medipol University , Istanbul , Turkey.

Objectives: There is limited information on effective balance training techniques including virtual reality (VR)-based balance exercises in residential settings and no studies have been designed to compare the effects of VR-based balance exercises with conventional balance exercises in older adults living in nursing homes in Turkey. The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of VR-based balance exercises on balance and fall risk in comparison to conventional balance exercises in older adults living in nursing homes.

Methods: A total sample of 18 subjects (65-82 years of age) with fall history who were randomly assigned to either the VR group (Group 1, n = 7) or the conventional exercise group (Group 2, n = 11) completed the exercise training.

Results: In both groups, Berg balance score (BBS), timed up & go duration, and left leg stance and tandem stance duration with eyes closed significantly improved with time (p < 0.05), but changes were similar in both groups (p > 0.05) after training, indicating that neither the exercise method was superior.

Conclusion: Similar improvements were found in balance and fall risk with VR-based balance training and conventional balance training in older adults living in the nursing home. Both exercise trainings can be preferable by health care professionals considering fall prevention. Appropriate patient selection is essential.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09593985.2015.1138009DOI Listing
January 2017

Beliefs towards mental illness in Turkish physiotherapy students.

Physiother Theory Pract 2015 22;31(7):461-5. Epub 2015 Jul 22.

b Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences , Marmara University , Istanbul , Turkey.

Mental health is a new area of specialization for physiotherapists. However, they usually meet patients with psychiatric co-morbidities secondary to other chronic diseases. It is important to explore the beliefs of future physiotherapists regarding mental illness in order to implement effective strategies to avoid possible stigmatizing attitudes that may interfere with the rehabilitation process. Moreover, the psychiatric field should be introduced to physiotherapists as a clinical and research area. Therefore, we aimed to question the beliefs of physiotherapy students regarding mental illness using the Beliefs towards Mental Illness Scale in two different universities in Turkey. The total score of 524 students was 46.5 ± 14.5 out of 105 while the Dangerousness Subscale score was 21.2 ± 5.8/40; Incurability and Poor Social and Interpersonal Skills Subscale score was 24.2 ± 9.3/55 and Shame Subscale score was 1.1 ± 1.9/10. Students who had a relationship with an individual having a mental problem and students who had consulted a psychiatrist/psychologist for any mental problem showed more positive beliefs. Future physiotherapists should be informed and trained regarding people with mental illness both to avoid stigma and to be aware of this area in physiotherapy settings. Therefore, it is important to implement new curricula for schools providing physiotherapy education including courses, lectures and clinical practices in the psychiatry field.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09593985.2015.1025321DOI Listing
July 2016