Publications by authors named "Melynda A Barnes"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Applications of 3-Dimensional Printing in Facial Plastic Surgery.

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2016 Mar 28;74(3):427-8. Epub 2015 Oct 28.

Chief Resident, Section of Otolaryngology, Department of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2015.10.016DOI Listing
March 2016

Aberrant lymphatic drainage and risk for melanoma recurrence after negative sentinel node biopsy in middle-aged and older men.

Head Neck 2016 04 14;38 Suppl 1:E754-60. Epub 2015 Jul 14.

Department of Dermatology, Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

Background: Aberrant lymphatic drainage is believed to contribute to the high recurrence rate of head and neck melanomas. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical significance of unexpected lymphatic drainage patterns.

Methods: A single institution retrospective analysis was performed of middle-aged and older men (mean age, 66.2 years; range, 41-87 years) who underwent successful lymphoscintigraphy with sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) from 1997 through 2012. Node status, distribution, and recurrence were assessed comparing patients with expected and unexpected drainage patterns.

Results: Sixty-six patients were identified with 55.8 months median follow-up (range, 5.6-206.1 months). Unexpected sentinel lymph node drainage was associated with multiple basin drainage (p < .01) and greater recurrence after negative SLNB (p = .03). Both groups had similar anatomic distribution, sentinel lymph node sampling, histopathologic characteristics, follow-up, and survival.

Conclusion: Lymphatic drainage differing from expected patterns is associated with greater recurrence after negative SLNB in middle-aged and older men. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E754-E760, 2016.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hed.24094DOI Listing
April 2016

The use of botulinum toxin for pediatric cricopharyngeal achalasia.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2011 Sep;75(9):1210-4

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine, 801 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305, United States.

Objectives: Cricopharyngeal achalasia is an uncommon cause of feeding difficulties in the pediatric population, and is especially rare in infants. Traditional management options include dilation or open cricopharyngeal myotomy. The use of botulinum toxin has been preliminarily reported for cricopharyngeal achalasia in children as a modality for diagnosis and management. This study describes the use of botulinum toxin as a definitive treatment for pediatric cricopharyngeal achalasia.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of three patients who were diagnosed with cricopharyngeal achalasia and underwent botulinum toxin injections to the cricopharyngeus muscle. The charts were reviewed for etiology, botulinum toxin dosage delivered, length of follow-up, postoperative need for nasogastric tube placement, and swallow studies.

Results: A total of 7 botulinum toxin injections into the cricopharyngeus muscle were performed in three infants with primary cricopharyngeal achalasia between April 2006 and February 2011. Mean dosage was 23.4 units per session (range: 10-44 units), or 3.1 U/kg (range: 1.4-5.3 U/kg). Mean interval period between injections was 3.3 months (range: 2.7-4.0 months). Mean follow-up period was 22.1 months (range: 3.4-44.5 months). One patient required hospital readmission after injection for presumed aspiration but recovered without need for surgical intervention. No long-term complications were noted post-operatively. All patients improved clinically and ultimately had their nasogastric feeding tubes removed.

Conclusions: Botulinum toxin appears to be a safe and effective option in the management of primary cricopharyngeal achalasia in children, and may prevent the need for myotomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2011.07.022DOI Listing
September 2011

The use of botulinum toxin for pediatric cricopharyngeal achalasia.

Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol 2011 Jun 17;75(6):830-4. Epub 2011 Apr 17.

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Objectives: Cricopharyngeal achalasia is an uncommon cause of feeding difficulties in the pediatric population, and is especially rare in infants. Traditional management options include dilation or open cricopharyngeal myotomy. The use of botulinum toxin has been preliminarily reported for cricopharyngeal achalasia in children as a modality for diagnosis and management. This study describes the use of botulinum toxin as a definitive treatment for pediatric cricopharyngeal achalasia.

Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of three patients who were diagnosed with cricopharyngeal achalasia and underwent botulinum toxin injections to the cricopharyngeus muscle. The charts were reviewed for etiology, botulinum toxin dosage delivered, length of follow-up, post-operative need for nasogastric tube placement, and swallow studies.

Results: A total of 7 botulinum toxin injections into the cricopharyngeus muscle were performed in three infants with primary cricopharyngeal achalasia between April 2006 and February 2011. Mean dosage was 23.4 units per session (range: 10-44 units), or 3.1 U/kg (range: 1.4-5.3 U/kg). Mean interval period between injections was 3.3 months (range: 2.7-4.0 months). Mean follow-up period was 22.1 months (range: 3.4-44.5 months). One patient required hospital readmission after injection for presumed aspiration but recovered without need for surgical intervention. No long-term complications were noted post-operatively. All patients improved clinically and ultimately had their nasogastric feeding tubes removed.

Conclusions: Botulinum toxin appears to be a safe and effective option in the management of primary cricopharyngeal achalasia in children, and may prevent the need for myotomy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijporl.2011.03.017DOI Listing
June 2011