Publications by authors named "Melissa Mauskar"

27 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Fractionated Carbon Dioxide Laser for the Treatment of Vulvar Lichen Sclerosus.

Obstet Gynecol 2021 06;137(6):965-967

Dr. Mauskar is from the Departments of Dermatology and Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas Texas; email:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000004414DOI Listing
June 2021

Vulvar lichen sclerosus in women of reproductive age.

Proc (Bayl Univ Med Cent) 2021 Feb 22;34(3):349-351. Epub 2021 Feb 22.

Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterDallasTexas.

Vulvar lichen sclerosus (vLS) is an inflammatory skin condition that predominantly affects the vulvar and perianal regions. Approximately 50% of cases present prior to menopause; however, there is a paucity of data on vLS in women of reproductive age as well as during their pregnancies. A retrospective review was performed at two tertiary referral centers to better describe cases of vLS in women of reproductive age. Thirty-three patients with a mean age of 40 years met inclusion criteria. In this group, vulvar pruritus was the most common presenting symptom (52%); 61% had biopsy-proven vLS, 42% had at least one autoimmune condition, 21% had comorbid depression or anxiety, 33% were given an incorrect diagnosis prior to vLS, and 42% had documented nonadherence to topical steroids. Among the eight patients who became pregnant, four had cesarean deliveries and 63% were symptomatic during pregnancy. When treating a woman who presents with vulvar pruritus or skin changes, vLS should be considered.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08998280.2021.1885093DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8059896PMC
February 2021

A lobulated mass on the upper back with prominent vasculature: A giant basal cell carcinoma.

Dermatol Reports 2021 Mar 7;13(1):9046. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Department of Dermatology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is characterized by slow but locally invasive growth. Although there is low metastatic potential, if not treated early, these skin cancers can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. In this case report, we present a man with a neglected BCC that developed into what is termed a giant BCC or one that is greater than 5 cm. This tumor was discovered only upon workup of orthostatic lightheadedness and iron deficiency anemia. Although rare, basal cell carcinoma must be included on the differential of a large cutaneous lesion and may be a source of significant blood loss.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/dr.2021.9046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8056320PMC
March 2021

Validation of two predictive models designed to aid clinicians in identifying Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis: A single institution retrospective review.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Apr 2. Epub 2021 Apr 2.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2021.03.097DOI Listing
April 2021

Strontium citrate associated drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome with granulomatous dermatitis.

JAAD Case Rep 2021 Apr 17;10:85-88. Epub 2021 Feb 17.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2021.02.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7985217PMC
April 2021

Kikuchi disease with cutaneous involvement complicated by features of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

J Cutan Pathol 2021 03 20;48(3):343-346. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cup.13720DOI Listing
March 2021

Cutaneous polyarteritis nodosa with clinical features of pyoderma gangrenosum.

JAAD Case Rep 2020 Dec 15;6(12):1291-1293. Epub 2020 Sep 15.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jdcr.2020.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7701038PMC
December 2020

Considerable unreimbursed medical care is delivered through electronic patient portals: A retrospective review.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Apr 19;84(4):1105-1107. Epub 2020 May 19.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.05.054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7234949PMC
April 2021

Use of teledermatology by dermatology hospitalists is effective in the diagnosis and management of inpatient disease.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2021 Jun 7;84(6):1547-1553. Epub 2020 May 7.

Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Background: Patient outcomes are improved when dermatologists provide inpatient consultations. Inpatient access to dermatologists is limited, illustrating an opportunity to use teledermatology. Little is known about the ability of dermatologists to accurately diagnose disease and manage inpatients with teledermatology, particularly when using nondermatologist-generated clinical data.

Methods: This prospective study assessed the ability of teledermatology to diagnose disease and manage 41 dermatology consultations from a large urban tertiary care center, using internal medicine referral documentation and photographs. Twenty-seven dermatology hospitalists were surveyed. Interrater agreement was assessed by the κ statistic.

Results: There was substantial agreement between in-person and teledermatology assessment of the diagnosis with differential diagnosis (median κ = 0.83), substantial agreement in laboratory evaluation decisions (median κ = 0.67), almost perfect agreement in imaging decisions (median κ = 1.0), and moderate agreement in biopsy decisions (median κ = 0.43). There was almost perfect agreement in treatment (median κ = 1.0), but no agreement in follow-up planning (median κ = 0.0). There was no association between raw photograph quality and the primary plus differential diagnosis or primary diagnosis alone.

Limitations: Selection bias and single-center nature.

Conclusions: Teledermatology may be effective in the inpatient setting, with concordant diagnosis, evaluation, and management decisions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.04.171DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7204758PMC
June 2021

Society of Dermatology Hospitalists supportive care guidelines for the management of Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in adults.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 Jun 7;82(6):1553-1567. Epub 2020 Mar 7.

Royal North Shore Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are life-threatening conditions with high morbidity and mortality. Supportive care management of SJS/TEN is highly variable. A systematic review of the literature was performed by dermatologists, ophthalmologists, intensivists, and gynecologists with expertise in SJS/TEN to generate statements for supportive care guideline development. Members of the Society of Dermatology Hospitalists with expertise in SJS/TEN were invited to participate in a modified, online Delphi-consensus. Participants were administered 9-point Likert scale questionnaires regarding 135 statements. The RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to evaluate and select proposed statements for guideline inclusion; statements with median ratings of 6.5 to 9 and a disagreement index of ≤1 were included in the guideline. For the final round, the guidelines were appraised by all of the participants. Included are an evidence-based discussion and recommendations for hospital setting and care team, wound care, ocular care, oral care, urogenital care, pain management, infection surveillance, fluid and electrolyte management, nutrition and stress ulcer prophylaxis, airway management, and anticoagulation in adult patients with SJS/TEN.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2020.02.066DOI Listing
June 2020

Vulvar diseases: Approach to the patient.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 Jun 8;82(6):1277-1284. Epub 2019 Nov 8.

Department of Dermatology, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina; Division of Dermatology, Carolinas Medical Center and Southeast Vulvar Clinic, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Patients with vulvar dermatoses often delay seeking medical treatment because of anxiety and embarrassment. Moreover, women frequently self-treat with various home remedies and see multiple clinicians before presenting to a dermatologist. Despite serving as the primary providers for patients with vulvovaginal symptoms, gynecologists typically receive limited training in the causes and management of these conditions. Dermatologists are experts in the evaluation and management of cutaneous disease and should be the caretakers of all skin, including the genitalia. Vulvar disorders are underrecognized by dermatologists for numerous reasons: inadequate training, lack of comfort with both interview and examination techniques, and unfamiliarity with normal anatomic variations. The first article in this continuing medical education series on vulvar dermatoses reviews the fundamentals, approach, and techniques that can be used to ensure a successful visit for both patient and provider.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2019.07.115DOI Listing
June 2020

Vulvar diseases: Conditions in adults and children.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2020 Jun 8;82(6):1287-1298. Epub 2019 Nov 8.

Department of Dermatology, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina; Division of Dermatology, Carolinas Medical Center, Carolinas Medical Center and Southeast Vulvar Clinic, Charlotte, North Carolina.

The most problematic vulvovaginal conditions are familiar to dermatologists but may exhibit distinct clinical features or medication management because of the anatomic location. The second article in this continuing medical education series focuses on management pearls for treating vulvar diseases. We highlight key conditions, such as lichen sclerosus, erosive lichen planus, and vulvodynia. In addition, we review conditions that dermatologists may be less familiar with, such as plasma cell vulvitis, desquamative inflammatory vaginitis, vulvar aphthae, and low estrogen states. Nearly 1 in 6 women experience undiagnosed and untreated vulvovaginal discomfort at some point in their lives. Physicians who treat vulvar disorders will improve the quality of life of countless women.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2019.10.077DOI Listing
June 2020

Vulvovaginal Manifestations in Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: Prevention and Treatment.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2019 Aug 19. Epub 2019 Aug 19.

Department of Dermatology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC. Electronic address:

The prevalence of acute vulvovaginal involvement in toxic epidermal necrolysis may be as high as 70%; up to 28% of females will also develop chronic vulvovaginal sequelae. There is little consensus regarding prevention and treatment of the gynecological sequelae of both Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN). We review acute and chronic sequelae including erosions, scar formation, chronic skin changes, urethral complications, adenosis and malignant transformation, vulvodynia and dyspareunia. We provide comprehensive recommendations on acute and long-term vulvovaginal care in adult and pediatric SJS/TEN patients. Acutely, vulvovaginal treatment should include ultrapotent topical steroid, followed by a non-irritating barrier cream applied to vulvar and perineal lesions. A steroid should be used intravaginally along with vaginal dilation in all adults with vaginal involvement, but should be avoided in pre-pubertal adolescents. Menstrual suppression should be considered in all reproductive age patients until vulvovaginal lesions have healed. Finally, referrals to pelvic floor physical therapy and surgical subspecialties should be offered on a case-by-case basis. This guide summarizes the current available literature, combined with expert opinion of both dermatologists and gynecologists who treat a high volume of SJS/TEN patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2019.08.031DOI Listing
August 2019

A catastrophic vulvar ulcer.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2020 03 21;222(3):276-277. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

Departments of Dermatology and Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas TX. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2019.06.038DOI Listing
March 2020

Disseminated Gonococcal Infection.

N Engl J Med 2019 Apr;380(16):1565

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMicm1811120DOI Listing
April 2019

Bullous eruption in 2 brothers.

Cutis 2018 Mar;101(3):169;178

Department of Dermatology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2018

Erosive Lichen Planus.

Authors:
Melissa Mauskar

Obstet Gynecol Clin North Am 2017 Sep;44(3):407-420

Department of Dermatology, UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard #MC-9190, Dallas, TX 75390-7208, USA. Electronic address:

Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous condition with a myriad of clinical manifestations. There are 3 forms of lichen planus that effect the vulva: papulosquamous, hypertrophic, and erosive. Erosive lichen planus can progress to vulvar scaring, vaginal stenosis, and squamous cell carcinoma; these long-term sequelae cause sexual distress, depression, and decreased quality of life for patients. Diagnosis is often delayed because of patient embarrassment or clinician misdiagnosis. Early recognition and treatment is essential to decreasing the morbidity of this condition. Multimodal treatment, along with a multidisciplinary approach, will improve outcomes and further clinical advances in studying this condition.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ogc.2017.04.004DOI Listing
September 2017

Abrupt Onset of Pustules in a Child.

JAMA Pediatr 2017 07;171(7):703-704

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2017.0357DOI Listing
July 2017

Generalized bullous fixed drug eruption treated with cyclosporine.

Dermatol Online J 2017 Feb 15;23(2). Epub 2017 Feb 15.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

Fixed drug eruptions (FDE) comprise 10 percent of alladverse cutaneous drug reactions and generalizedbullous fixed drug eruptions (GBFDE) are a raresubset of FDEs. We present a patient with severeGBFDE caused by ibuprofen successfully treated withcyclosporine. Further work is needed to determine ifcyclosporine can be an effective therapy for GBFDE.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2017

Fever and a Pustular Rash.

JAMA 2017 02;317(6):637-638

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2016.18020DOI Listing
February 2017

Cutaneous Ulcers Secondary to Cytomegalovirus and Herpes Simplex Virus in an Immunocompromised Patient.

Am J Med Sci 2017 Feb 16;353(2):e3. Epub 2016 Nov 16.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amjms.2016.11.018DOI Listing
February 2017

Painful purpura associated with exposure to levamisole-adulterated cocaine.

BMJ Case Rep 2017 Jan 24;2017. Epub 2017 Jan 24.

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2016-219077DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5278340PMC
January 2017

Cutaneous extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma mimicking cellulitis an HIV positive patient without lymphopenia.

J Cutan Pathol 2017 Mar 2;44(3):296-299. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.

We present the case of a 28-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with a 1-month history of a steadily enlarging, firm painful lesion on the right posterior shoulder. The patient was initially treated for cellulitis given his clinical picture. Histopathologic examination revealed an angiocentric and dermal proliferation of markedly atypical lymphoid cells with numerous mitoses and apoptotic bodies along with broad zones of necrosis. Biopsy revealed the presentation to be consistent with NK/T-cell lymphoma. The cutaneous lesions from NK/T-cell lymphoma can often be initially mistaken for cellulitis, therefore this malignancy should be included on the differential in a patient HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cup.12885DOI Listing
March 2017

MYC amplification in angiosarcomas arising in the setting of chronic lymphedema of morbid obesity.

J Cutan Pathol 2017 Jan 21;44(1):15-19. Epub 2016 Oct 21.

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

Background: Angiosarcoma is a malignancy of vascular endothelial cells which may arise secondarily as a complication of lymphedema, including chronic lymphedema of morbid obesity. Amplifications in MYC are frequently present in secondary angiosarcoma (arising in irradiated sites and chronic lymphedema) and less frequently in primary cutaneous angiosarcoma.

Objective: To describe the presence of MYC amplifications in two cases of cutaneous angiosarcoma secondary to chronic lymphedema of morbid obesity.

Methods: This study is a case series of two patients with cutaneous angiosarcoma. Clinical data was retrieved from the medical records. Histopathological analysis of the biopsy specimens was performed, including immunohistochemistry, along with fluorescence in situ hybridization.

Results: Angiosarcoma arose in the setting of massive chronic lymphedema complicating morbid obesity without other predisposing risk factors. Both cases exhibited epithelioid cell morphology and high-level MYC amplification.

Conclusion: We report MYC amplification in two cases of angiosarcoma arising in massive chronic lymphedema of morbid obesity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cup.12827DOI Listing
January 2017

Cutaneous horn on the penis.

J Am Acad Dermatol 2016 10;75(4):e127-e128

Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2015.12.022DOI Listing
October 2016

Ulcers on an Infant's Sacrum. Ulcerated segmental infantile hemangioma (IH).

JAMA Pediatr 2015 Sep;169(9):873-4

Department of Dermatology, Children's National Health System, Washington, DC.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamapediatrics.2015.1137DOI Listing
September 2015