Publications by authors named "Melissa B Diamond"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Managing chemotherapy-related cardiotoxicity in survivors of childhood cancers.

Paediatr Drugs 2014 Oct;16(5):373-89

Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine and the Children's Research Center of Michigan at the Children's Hospital of Michigan, 3901 Beaubien Boulevard, Suite 1K40, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA,

In the US, children diagnosed with cancer are living longer, but not without consequences from the same drugs that cured their cancer. In these patients, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of non-cancer-related morbidity and mortality. Although this review focuses on anthracycline-related cardiomyopathy in childhood cancer survivors, the global lifetime risk of other cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, arrhythmias and intracardiac conduction abnormalities, hypertension, and stroke also are increased. Besides anthracyclines, newer molecularly targeted agents, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and tyrosine kinase inhibitors, also have been associated with acute hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and increased risk of ischemic cardiac events and arrhythmias, and are summarized here. This review also covers other risk factors for chemotherapy-related cardiotoxicity (including both modifiable and non-modifiable factors), monitoring strategies (including both blood and imaging-based biomarkers) during and following cancer treatment, and discusses the management of cardiotoxicity (including prevention strategies such as cardioprotection by use of dexrazoxane).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40272-014-0085-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4417358PMC
October 2014

Pediatric cardiomyopathies: causes, epidemiology, clinical course, preventive strategies and therapies.

Future Cardiol 2013 Nov;9(6):817-48

Department of Pediatrics, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1601 NW 12th Avenue, 9th Floor, Miami, FL 33136, USA.

Pediatric cardiomyopathies, which are rare but serious disorders of the muscles of the heart, affect at least one in every 100,000 children in the USA. Approximately 40% of children with symptomatic cardiomyopathy undergo heart transplantation or die from cardiac complications within 2 years. However, a significant number of children suffering from cardiomyopathy are surviving into adulthood, making it an important chronic illness for both pediatric and adult clinicians to understand. The natural history, risk factors, prevalence and incidence of this pediatric condition were not fully understood before the 1990s. Questions regarding optimal diagnostic, prognostic and treatment methods remain. Children require long-term follow-up into adulthood in order to identify the factors associated with best clinical practice including diagnostic approaches, as well as optimal treatment approaches. In this article, we comprehensively review current research on various presentations of this disease, along with current knowledge about their causes, treatments and clinical outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/fca.13.66DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3903430PMC
November 2013