Publications by authors named "Melis Gültekin"

38 Publications

In regard to Spampinato et al.

Radiother Oncol 2021 Feb 26. Epub 2021 Feb 26.

Hacettepe University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara, Turkey.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2021.02.027DOI Listing
February 2021

Does Internal Mammary Node Irradiation for Breast Cancer Make a Significant Difference to the Diameter of the Internal Mammary Artery? Correlation with Computed Tomography.

Breast Care (Basel) 2020 Dec 22;15(6):635-641. Epub 2020 Jun 22.

Department of Radiology, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: Lymphatic irradiation in breast cancer improves locoregional control and has been shown to decrease distant metastasis. However, irradiation also accelerates the formation of atherosclerosis and can cause stenosis, not only in the coronary arteries but also in the internal mammary artery (IMA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of radiation on IMAs via computed tomography (CT).

Methods: We reviewed the data of 3,612 patients with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) between January 2010 and December 2016. We included 239 patients with appropriate imaging and nodal irradiation in the study. All patients were treated with lymphatic irradiation of 46-50 Gy, and a boost dose (6-10 Gy) to the involved internal mammary nodes (IMNs) when imaging studies demonstrated pathological enlargement. Bilateral IMA diameter and the presence of calcification were assessed via thin contrast-enhanced CT and those of ipsilateral irradiated IMAs were compared with those of contralateral nonirradiated IMAs.

Results: The mean diameter of irradiated IMAs was significantly shorter than that of nonirradiated IMAs, regardless of laterality. All vascular calcifications were determined on the irradiated side. A boost dose of radiation to the IMNs and radiation technique did not significantly affect the IMA diameter or the presence of calcification.

Conclusions: The diameter of the IMA is decreased due to RT regardless of laterality, radiation technique, and administration of a boost dose. Evaluation of vessels on CT before coronary artery bypass graft or flap reconstruction can help the surgeon select the most appropriate vessel.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000508244DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7768163PMC
December 2020

Adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy: dosimetric comparison of conventional versus 3-dimensional planning in endometrial cancer.

J Contemp Brachytherapy 2020 Dec 16;12(6):601-605. Epub 2020 Dec 16.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: To evaluate dosimetric differences between point-based 2-dimensional (2D) vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) treatment planning technique and volume-based 3-dimensional (3D) VBT method for endometrial cancer (EC).

Material And Methods: Ten patients with uterine-confined EC treated with VBT were included in this study. All patients received 27.5 Gy in 5 fractions. Three different treatment plans were performed for each patient: plan A for dose prescribed to the entire vaginal wall thickness delineated via computed tomography guidance, plan B for dose prescribed to the vaginal mucosa/cylinder surface, and plan C for dose prescribed to 5 mm beyond the vaginal mucosa/cylinder surface. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) of treatment volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were evaluated and compared.

Results: DVH analysis of target volume doses (D, D, and D) showed a significant difference between plan A and plan B ( = 0.005), and plan B was found lower. D for plan C was significantly higher than plan A ( = 0.009), but for D and D, no statistically significant difference was found ( = 0.028 and = 0.028, respectively). In terms of OARs doses, including vagina, rectum, bladder, and sigmoid, D doses were significantly higher in plan A than plan B ( = 0.009, = 0.009, = 0.005, and = 0.005, respectively). All these doses were also significantly lower than in plan C ( = 0.005, = 0.012, and = 0.013, respectively), except for sigmoid ( = 0.155).

Conclusions: In this dosimetric analysis, we have shown that the volume-based 3D VBT technique provides the ability to balance the target dose against the sparing of OARs. Therefore, in the new modern 3D treatment era, instead of normalization of the dose to standard reference points, customized 3D volume-based VBT planning should be recommended.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/jcb.2020.101694DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7787204PMC
December 2020

In Regard to Mell et al.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2020 11;108(4):1115-1116

Hacettepe University Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara, Turkey.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2020.05.045DOI Listing
November 2020

Role of vaginal brachytherapy boost following adjuvant external beam radiotherapy in cervical cancer: Turkish Society for Radiation Oncology Gynecologic Group Study (TROD 04-002).

Int J Gynecol Cancer 2021 Feb 30;31(2):185-193. Epub 2020 Sep 30.

Radiation Oncology, Ege University Faculty of Medicine, Izmir, Turkey.

Objective: There are a limited number of studies supporting vaginal brachytherapy boost to external beam radiotherapy in the adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of the addition of vaginal brachytherapy boost to adjuvant external beam radiotherapy on oncological outcomes and toxicity in patients with cervical cancer.

Methods: Patients treated with post-operative external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy ± vaginal brachytherapy between January 2001 and January 2019 were retrospectively evaluated. The treatment outcomes and prognostic factors were analyzed in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy with or without vaginal brachytherapy.

Results: A total of 480 patients were included in the analysis. The median age was 51 years (range 42-60). At least two intermediate risk factors were observed in 51% of patients, while 49% had at least one high-risk factor. The patients in the external beam radiotherapy + vaginal brachytherapy group had worse prognostic factors than the external beam radiotherapy alone group. With a median follow-up time of 56 months (range 33-90), the 5-year overall survival rate was 82%. There was no difference in 5-year overall survival (87% vs 79%, p=0.11), recurrence-free survival (74% vs 71%, p=0.49), local recurrence-free survival (78% vs 76%, p=0.16), and distant metastasis-free survival (85% vs 76%, p=0.09) rates between treatment groups. There was no benefit of addition of vaginal brachytherapy to external beam radiotherapy in patients with positive surgical margins. In multivariate analysis, stage (overall survival and local recurrence-free survival), tumor histology (recurrence-free survival, local recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival), parametrial invasion (recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival), lymphovascular space invasion (recurrence-free survival), and lymph node metastasis (distant metastasis-free survival) were found as negative prognostic factors.

Conclusion: Adding vaginal brachytherapy boost to external beam radiotherapy did not provide any benefit in local control or survival in patients with cervical cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ijgc-2020-001733DOI Listing
February 2021

Using a pessary during radiotherapy in reducible pelvic organ prolapse and vaginal cancer: a case report and review of the literature.

J Contemp Brachytherapy 2020 Apr 11;12(2):175-180. Epub 2020 Feb 11.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: Primary vaginal cancer and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) combination is extremely rare. Although definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and brachytherapy (BT) is the standard treatment for advanced stage primary vaginal cancer, there is a limited data about the treatment of primary vaginal cancer combined with POP due to its rarity. In addition, radiotherapy (RT) process may be difficult in these cases and often result in more toxicity.

Case Presentation: In this case report, we present a 77-year-old woman with a diagnosis of primary vaginal cancer associated with POP, who was treated with definitive CRT using a pessary to restore vaginal anatomy for optimal radiation. Following CRT, complete response was observed and vaginal cuff BT was performed. The patient tolerated the treatment very well and is still alive without disease at 10-months follow-up.

Conclusions: Combined primary vaginal cancer and POP is an extremely rare clinical entity, with only a few cases reported in the literature. When applying CRT in these cases, critical organ doses may be higher than expected due to the downward descent of the pelvic organs. Especially in elderly patients, a pessary can be used as a non-surgical procedure to restore the anatomy for symptom relief during definitive CRT. Additionally, it allows tumors to be targeted more precisely.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/jcb.2020.92997DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7207234PMC
April 2020

Multi-institutional validation of the ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference risk grouping in Turkish endometrial cancer patients treated with comprehensive surgical staging.

J Obstet Gynaecol 2020 Apr 29:1-7. Epub 2020 Apr 29.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey.

In this study, 683 patients with endometrial cancer (EC) after comprehensive surgical staging were classified into four risk groups as low (LR), intermediate (IR), high-intermediate (HIR) and high-risk (HR), according to the recent consensus risk grouping. Patients with disease confined to the uterus, ≥50% myometrial invasion (MI) and/or grade 3 histology were treated with vaginal brachytherapy (VBT). Patients with stage II disease, positive/close surgical margins or extra-uterine extension were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT)±VBT. The median follow-up was 56 months. The overall survival (OS) was significantly different between LR and HR groups, and there was a trend between LR and HIR groups. Relapse-free survival (RFS) was significantly different between LR and HIR, LR and HR and IR and HR groups. There was no significant difference in OS and RFS rates between the HIR and HR groups. In HR patients, the OS and RFS rates were significantly higher in stage IB - grade 3 and stage II compared to stage III and non-endometrioid histology without any difference between the two uterine-confined stages and between stage III and non-endometrioid histology. The current risk grouping does not clearly discriminate the HIR and IR groups. In patients with comprehensive surgical staging, a further risk grouping is needed to distinguish the real HR group.Impact statement The standard treatment for endometrial cancer (EC) is surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy is recommended according to risk factors. The recent European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) and European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO) guideline have introduced a new risk group. However, the risk grouping is still quite heterogeneous. This study demonstrated that the current risk grouping recommended by ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO does not clearly discriminate the intermediate risk (IR) and high-intermediate risk (HIR) groups. Based on the results of this study, a new risk grouping can be made to discriminate HIR and IR groups clearly in patients with comprehensive surgical staging.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443615.2020.1737661DOI Listing
April 2020

Stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with oligometastatic or oligoprogressive gynecological malignancies: a multi-institutional analysis.

Int J Gynecol Cancer 2020 06 8;30(6):865-872. Epub 2020 Apr 8.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe Universitesi Tip Fakultesi, Ankara, Turkey.

Introduction: Data supporting stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastatic patients are increasing; however, the outcomes for gynecological cancer patients have yet to be fully explored. Our aim is to analyze the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy in the treatment of patients with recurrent or oligometastatic ovarian cancer or cervical cancer.

Methods: The clinical data of 29 patients (35 lesions) with oligometastatic cervical cancer (21 patients, 72%) and ovarian carcinoma (8 patients, 28%) who were treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastatic sites were retrospectively evaluated. All patients had <5 metastases at diagnosis or during progression, and were treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastatic disease. Patients with ≥5 metastases or with brain metastases and those who underwent re-irradiation for primary site were excluded. Age, progression time, mean biologically effective dose, and treatment response were compared for overall survival and progression-free survival.

Results: A total of 29 patients were included in the study. De novo oligometastatic disease was observed in 7 patients (24%), and 22 patients (76%) had oligoprogression. The median follow-up was 15.3 months (range 1.9-95.2). The 1 and 2 year overall survival rates were 85% and 62%, respectively, and the 1 and 2 year progression-free survival rates were 27% and 18%, respectively. The 1 and 2 year local control rates for all patients were 84% and 84%, respectively. All disease progressions were observed at a median time of 7.7 months (range 1.0-16.0) after the completion of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Patients with a complete response after stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastasis had a significantly higher 2 year overall survival and progression-free survival compared with their counterparts. In multivariate analysis, early progression (≤12 months) and complete response after stereotactic body radiotherapy for oligometastasis were the significant prognostic factors for improved overall survival. However, no significant factor was found for progression-free survival in the multivariable analysis. No patients experienced grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities.

Conclusions: Patients with early detection of oligometastasis (≤12 months) and with complete response observed at the stereotactic body radiotherapy site had a better survival compared with their counterparts. Stereotactic body radiotherapy at the oligometastatic site resulted in excellent local control rates with minimal toxicity, and can potentially contribute to long-term survival.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ijgc-2019-001115DOI Listing
June 2020

Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for bone metastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor: Case report and review of the literature.

Rep Pract Oncol Radiother 2020 May-Jun;25(3):331-335. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. These tumors are rare and only make bone metastases at a rate of 5%.

Case Summary: A 31-year-old male with a GIST presented with solitary bone metastasis at the right iliac bone. We performed stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and achieved excellent local control. Herein, our case is presented, and a short review of the literature is carried out.

Conclusion: SABR should be considered as a treatment option in GIST with bone metastasis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rpor.2020.02.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7114605PMC
February 2020

Dosimetric comparison of two different applicators and rectal retraction methods used in inverse optimization-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

J Contemp Brachytherapy 2020 Feb 28;12(1):35-43. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric differences between two different applicators and rectal-retraction methods used in image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC).

Material And Methods: Ten patients with LACC treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy and inverse optimization-based IGBT were included in this study. In each patient, at least one fraction of IGBT was performed using tandem-ovoids (TO) with vaginal gauze packing (VGP) or tandem-ring (TR) with rectal-retractor (RR). High-risk clinical target volume (CTV) and intermediate-risk CTV (CTV) were defined as CTVs, and bladder, rectum, sigmoid, small bowel, urethra, and vaginal mucosa were defined as organs at risk (OARs). All patients received 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in 28 fractions. After EBRT, 28 Gy high-dose-rate (HDR) IGBT in 4 fractions was delivered to central disease. A plan comparison was performed using dose-volume histogram (DVH) and treatment planning parameters for CTVs and OARs.

Results: There were no significant differences in D values of CTV. In terms of rectum dose, TR with RR was found to be significantly better than TO with VGP ( < 0.0001 for D and < 0.013 for V). Although, there were no statistically significant differences in D value of bladder, sigmoid, small bowel, upper vaginal mucosa, and urethra, mean value of D for all defined OARs were found lower in TR than in TO. Bladder V, upper vaginal mucosa V, middle and lower vaginal mucosa D values were all found to be significantly lower for TR than for TO ( < 0.035). CTV and CTV volumes contoured in TR were approximately 11% and 9% smaller than TO, respectively.

Conclusions: The results showed that there were no statistically differences in D value of CTV and CTV. However, all DVH parameters for OARs in TR with RR were found to be better than in TO with VGP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/jcb.2020.92699DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7073337PMC
February 2020

3D printer-based novel intensity-modulated vaginal brachytherapy applicator: feasibility study.

J Contemp Brachytherapy 2020 Feb 28;12(1):17-26. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: To design a novel high-dose-rate intracavitary applicator which may lead to enhanced dose modulation in the brachytherapy of gynecological cancers.

Material And Methods: A novel brachytherapy applicator, auxiliary equipment and quality control phantom were modeled in SketchUp Pro 2017 modeling software and printed out from a MakerBot Replicator Z18 three-dimensional printer. As a printing material polylactic acid (PLA) filament was used and compensator materials including aluminum, stainless-steel and Cerrobend alloy were selected according to their radiation attenuation properties. To evaluate the feasibility of the novel applicator, two sets of measurements were performed in a Varian GammaMed iX Plus high-dose rate iridium-192 (Ir) brachytherapy unit and all of the treatment plans were calculated in Varian BrachyVision treatment planning system v.8.9 with TG43-based formalism. In the first step, catheter and source-dwell positioning accuracy, reproducibility of catheter and source positions, linearity of relative dose with changing dwell times and compensator materials were tested to evaluate the mechanical stability of the designed applicator. In the second step, to validate the dosimetric accuracy of the novel applicator measured point dose and two-dimensional dose distributions in homogeneous medium were compared with calculated data in the treatment planning system using PTW VeriSoft v.5.1 software.

Results: In mechanical quality control tests source-dwell positioning accuracy and linearity of the designed applicator were measured as ≤ 0.5 mm and ≤ 1.5%, respectively. Reproducibility of the treatment planning was ≥ 97.7% for gamma evaluation criteria of 1 mm distance to agreement and 1% dose difference of local dose. In dosimetric quality control tests, maximum difference between measured and calculated point dose was found as 3.8% in homogeneous medium. In two-dimensional analysis, the number of passing points was greater than 90% for all measurements using gamma evaluation criteria of 3 mm distance to agreement and 3% dose difference of local dose.

Conclusions: The novel brachytherapy applicator met the necessary requirements in quality control tests.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/jcb.2020.92407DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7073342PMC
February 2020

Ewing sarcoma in an infant and review of the literature.

Turk J Pediatr 2019 ;61(5):760-764

Departments of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Bedük Esen ÇS, Gültekin M, Aydın GB, Akyüz C, Karlı Oğuz K, Orhan D, Cengiz M, Gürkaynak M, Yıldız F. Ewing sarcoma in an infant and review of the literature. Turk J Pediatr 2019; 61: 760-764. Ewing sarcoma (ES) is a rare tumor in infants and prognosis is controversial. There are no standard recommendations for treatment in such very young patients. Generally, radiotherapy (RT) is not a part of treatment in infants due to the risk of severe late side effects. In this case report, we report a 7-month-old boy with diagnosis of left mastoid bone ES with lung metastases at diagnosis, showing a rapidly fatal outcome despite aggressive systemic chemotherapy and RT without surgery.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.24953/turkjped.2019.05.016DOI Listing
August 2020

In Regard to Fernando et al.: Synchronous versus sequential chemo-radiotherapy in patients with early stage breast cancer (SECRAB): A randomised, phase III, trial.

Radiother Oncol 2020 06 19;147:232. Epub 2020 Feb 19.

Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Turkey.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.radonc.2020.01.015DOI Listing
June 2020

Is there any benefit of paraaortic field irradiation in pelvic lymph node positive endometrial cancer patients? A propensity match analysis.

J Obstet Gynaecol 2020 Oct 3;40(7):1012-1019. Epub 2019 Dec 3.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

We evaluated the survival outcomes and recurrence patterns of endometrial cancer (EC) patients with pelvic lymph node metastases who received postoperative radiotherapy (RT) to the pelvis (P-RT) or to the pelvis plus paraaortic lymph nodes (PA-RT) with or without systemic chemotherapy (ChT). The data from 167 patients with stage IIIC1 EC treated with postoperative RT or RT and ChT were collected retrospectively. Those patients with pelvic lymph node metastases were treated with either P-RT (106 patients, 63%) or PA-RT (61 patients, 37%). The median follow-up time for the entire cohort was 49 (range = 5-199) months. The patients receiving adjuvant ChT and RT had significantly higher 5-year OS rates (77% vs. 33%,  < .001) and 5-year PFS rates (71% vs. 30%,  < .001) when compared to those receiving adjuvant RT alone. The patients receiving P-RT and ChT had significantly higher 5-year OS rates and 5-year PFS rates when compared to those treated with adjuvant PA-RT in the entire cohort and matched cohort. Adjuvant ChT together with RT is the strongest predictor of the OS and PFS. Prophylactic PA-RT is unnecessary, even if ChT is used together with P-RT in EC patients with pelvic lymph node metastasis.Impact statement Local and distant recurrence risks are relatively higher in patients with stage IIIC disease, postoperative adjuvant treatment is required to reduce the recurrence risk. Adjuvant RT is a common approach for patients with locally advanced EC. Optimal target volume for RT in patients with stage IIIC EC remains controversial. We demonstrated that extended field RT is unnecessary, even if ChT is used together with pelvic RT in stage IIIC EC patients. We demonstrated that adjuvant ChT together with RT is the strongest predictor of the OS and PFS for EC patients with pelvic lymph node metastases. Extended field RT is unnecessary, even if ChT is used together with pelvic RT in EC patients with pelvic lymph node metastases. Although adjuvant treatment modalities are associated with improvements in survival, distant metastasis still remains the most common site of recurrence in advanced EC patients. Thus, further research is warranted to identify improved combined modality strategies to optimise the outcomes for EC patients with pelvic lymph node metastasis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01443615.2019.1679742DOI Listing
October 2020

In Regard to Doyen et al.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2019 12;105(5):1163-1164

Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.09.031DOI Listing
December 2019

Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for left-sided chest wall and lymphatic irradiation.

J Appl Clin Med Phys 2019 Dec 3;20(12):36-44. Epub 2019 Nov 3.

Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare five different techniques for chest wall (CW) and lymphatic irradiation in patients with left-sided breast carcinoma.

Methods: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), forward-planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (FP-IMRT), inverse-planned IMRT (IP-IMRT; 7- or 9-field), and hybrid IP-/FP-IMRT were compared in 10 patients. Clinical target volume (CTV) included CW and internal mammary (IM), supraclavicular (SC), and axillary nodes. Planning target volumes (PTVs), CTVs, and organs at risks (OARs) doses were analyzed with dose-volume histograms (DVHs).

Results: No differences could be observed among the techniques for doses received by 95% of the volume (D95%) of lymphatics. However, the FP-IMRT resulted in a significantly lower D95% dose to the CW-PTV compared to other techniques (P = 0.002). The 9-field IP-IMRT achieved the lowest volumes receiving higher doses (hotspots). Both IP-IMRT techniques provided similar mean doses (Dmean) for the left lung which were smaller than the other techniques. There was no difference between the techniques for maximum dose (Dmax) of right breast. However, FP-IMRT resulted in lower Dmean and volume of right breast receiving at least 5 Gy doses compared to other techniques.

Conclusion: The dose homogeneity in CW-CTV was better using IMRT techniques compared to 3DCRT. Especially 9-field IP-IMRT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution in IM and axillary CTVs. Moreover, the OARs volumes receiving low radiation doses were larger with IP-IMRT technique, while volumes receiving high radiation doses were larger with FP-IMRT technique. Hybrid IMRT plans were found to have the advantages of both FP- and IP-IMRT techniques.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acm2.12757DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6909119PMC
December 2019

Radiotherapy After Skin-Sparing Mastectomy and Implant-Based Breast Reconstruction.

Clin Breast Cancer 2019 10 11;19(5):e611-e616. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Medical School, Ankara, Turkey. Electronic address:

Introduction: We evaluated the cosmetic results of radiotherapy (RT) after implant-based reconstruction (IBR).

Patients And Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 170 patients with 171 breast cancers treated between December 2004 and January 2016 in 2 university hospitals. RT fields were reconstructed breast (RB) only in 24 (14%), and RB and regional lymphatics in 147 (86%) breasts, respectively. All but 1 patient received a total 50 Gy with conventional fractionation. All patients received systemic chemotherapy. One hundred thirty-eight (81%) patients received hormonal therapy; 118 tamoxifen and 20 aromatase inhibitor.

Results: Median follow-up time was 46.8 months (range, 1-163 months). The 5-year disease-free and overall survival rate was 83% and 93%, respectively. Cosmetic results were considered excellent in 111 (65%), fair in 46 (27%), and bad in 14 (8%) RB by patients. Thirty-four (20%) RB had restorative surgery; because of surgeons' preference because of implant natural life time span in 5, and contracture, fibrosis, deformation, or dislocation of the implant, or cellulitis in the remaining. Statistically significant adverse factors in univariate analysis for impaired cosmetic outcome were bolus use on the RB, lymphatic irradiation, and volume that received at least 110% of the prescribed dose being > 1%. The use of bolus material was the only prognostic factor for deterioration of the cosmetic result in multivariate analysis.

Conclusion: RT after IBR yields acceptable cosmetic results. Although only 111 (65%) of RBs were considered to have excellent cosmetic results, only a small percentage of patients needed reoperation because of bad cosmetic outcome.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clbc.2019.04.002DOI Listing
October 2019

In Regard to Bondiau et al.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2019 07;104(3):694

Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2019.03.019DOI Listing
July 2019

A multi-institutional analysis of sequential versus 'sandwich' adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy for stage IIIC endometrial carcinoma.

J Gynecol Oncol 2019 May;30(3):e28

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: To analyze the outcomes of sequential or sandwich chemotherapy (ChT) and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with node-positive endometrial cancer (EC).

Methods: Data from 4 centers were collected retrospectively for 179 patients with stage IIIC EC treated with postoperative RT and ChT (paclitaxel and carboplatin). Patients were either treated with 6 cycles of ChT followed by RT (sequential arm; 96 patients) or with 3 cycles of ChT, RT, and an additional 3 cycles of ChT (sandwich arm; 83 patients). Prognostic factors affecting overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed.

Results: The 5-year OS and PFS rates were 64% and 59%, respectively, with a median follow-up of 41 months (range, 5-167 months). The 5-year OS rates were significantly higher in the sandwich than sequential arms (74% vs. 56%; p=0.03) and the difference for 5-year PFS rates was nearly significant (65% vs. 54%; p=0.05). In univariate analysis, treatment strategy, age, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, pathology, rate of myometrial invasion, and grade were prognostic factors for OS and PFS. In multivariate analysis, non-endometrioid histology, advanced FIGO stage, and adjuvant sequential ChT and RT were negative predictors for OS, whereas only non-endometrioid histology was a prognostic factor for PFS.

Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant ChT and RT for stage IIIC EC patients, either given sequentially or sandwiched, offers excellent clinical efficacy and acceptably low toxicity. Our data support the superiority of the sandwich regimen compared to the sequential strategy in stage IIIC EC patients for OS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3802/jgo.2019.30.e28DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424855PMC
May 2019

Treatment outcomes of endometrial cancer patients with paraaortic lymph node metastasis: a multi-institutional analysis.

Int J Gynecol Cancer 2019 01;29(1):94-101

Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: To analyze the prognostic factors and treatment outcomes in endometrial cancer patients with paraaortic lymph node metastasis.

Methods: Data from four centers were collected retrospectively for 92 patients with endometrial cancer treated with combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy or adjuvant radiotherapy alone postoperatively, delivered by either the sandwich or sequential method. Prognostic factors affecting overall survival and progression-free survival were analyzed.

Results: The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 35 % and 33 %, respectively, after a median follow-up time of 33 months. The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were significantly higher in patients receiving radiotherapy and chemotherapy postoperatively compared with patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy alone (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). In a subgroup analysis of patients treated with adjuvant combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were significantly higher in patients receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy via the sandwich method compared with patients treated with sequential chemotherapy and radiotherapy (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively). In the univariate analysis, in addition to treatment strategy, pathology, depth of myometrial invasion, and tumor grade were significant prognostic factors for both overall survival and progression-free survival. In the multivariate analysis, grade III disease, myometrial invasion greater than or equal to 50%, and adjuvant radiotherapy alone were negative predictors for both overall survival and progression-free survival.

Conclusion: We demonstrated that adjuvant combined treatment including radiotherapyand chemotherapy significantly increases overall survival and progression-free survival rates compared with postoperative pelvic and paraaortic radiotherapy.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ijgc-2018-000029DOI Listing
January 2019

Real world survival data of a rare malignancy: Anal cancer results in HIV negative patients from Turkey.

Turk J Gastroenterol 2018 07;29(4):411-418

Department of Medical Oncology, Hacettepe University Cancer Institute, Ankara, Turkey.

Background/aims: An organ preservation approach using chemoradiotherapy has been established for anal cancer. This retrospective cohort study aimed to define the clinico-demographic characteristics and outcomes of cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-negative anal carcinoma during a period of 20 years in a single comprehensive cancer institute.

Materials And Methods: This was a single-center retrospective cohort study of patients who were treated between January 1995 and January 2015. The primary outcome measures that were investigated included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), colostomy rates, and colostomy-free survival (CFS).

Results: A total of 28 patients who were principally treated with standard 5-fluorouracil + mitomycin combination chemoradiotherapy were eligible for analysis. The 3- and 5-year PFS rates were 92.4% and 63%, respectively. The lower T stage was found to be associated with a prolonged PFS (p=0.001). The 3- and 5-year CFS rates were 84.3% and 74.9%, respectively. A longer CFS was observed with lower T stages (p=0.05). At the last follow-up, 75% of the patients with anal cancer were alive, and 71.4% of the patients were disease free. The median OS was not reached with a median follow-up of 54 months (range, 6-115 months). The 3- and 5-year OS rates were 82% and 71.1%, respectively. No late toxicity was observed during the follow-up period.

Discussion: The short- and long-term prognoses of HIV-negative patients with anal squamous cell carcinoma were good, and low-grade toxicity was rare, thereby demonstrating that these patients can be successfully treated in a real-life setting with favorable outcomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/tjg.2018.17660DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6284643PMC
July 2018

Local recurrence outcomes after breast conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast and a comparison with ECOG E5194 study.

Breast 2018 Dec 10;42:10-14. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Ege University Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Oncology Department, Izmir, Turkey. Electronic address:

Purpose: Turkish Radiation Oncology Study Group investigated local recurrence rates and prognostic factors in patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast treated with breast conservative surgery (BCS) followed by radiotherapy (RT) and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Study E5194 were compared with the original study.

Patients And Methods: Totally 252 patients were evaluated retrospectively. Prognostic factors that might influence local control (age, nuclear grade, comedo necrosis, surgical margins, tumor size, hormone receptor status) were compared. The eligibility criteria of ECOG 5194 were stratified into two groups as in the original study and were compared for local control.

Results: The median follow-up time was 59 (21-220) months. Local recurrence was observed in 9 patients (3.6%) who had invasive carcinoma (3 patients) and DCIS (6 patients). Ten years local control rates was 91.8% respectively. We found that the risk of ipsilateral breast recurrence was significantly higher in women younger than 50 years old (p = 0.016). In addition, a statistically significant trend was found in patients with tumor larger than 1 cm and HER2 positive tumors (p = 0.051, p = 0.068 respectively). When 12-year results were compared with the ECOG 5194, adjuvant RT produced an absolute difference of 11% in low-intermediate and 20% in high grade in local control.

Conclusion: In our study, the 10-year local control rate was 92% and younger than 50 years old was the most important unfavorable prognostic factor for local recurrence. There was provided 20% absolute local control with adjuvant radiotherapy which eligibility criteria of ECOG 5194 high grade group.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.breast.2018.08.094DOI Listing
December 2018

In Regard to Rao et al.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2018 05;101(1):235-236

Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.01.061DOI Listing
May 2018

Adjuvant Small Pelvic Radiotherapy in Patients with Cervical Cancer Having Intermediate Risk Factors Only - Is It Sufficient?

Oncol Res Treat 2017 21;40(9):523-527. Epub 2017 Aug 21.

Background: We sought to determine the outcomes of adjuvant small pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and prognostic factors for survival and disease control.

Patients And Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 113 cervical cancer patients treated with postoperative median 50.4-Gy small pelvic EBRT. We treated the surgical bed, bilateral parametria, paravaginal soft tissues, upper third of the vagina, and presacral lymphatics.

Results: Median follow-up of all patients and survivors was 58 and 67 months, respectively. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival rates were 91 and 82%, and 85 and 74%, respectively. The locoregional failure rate was 10%. Age was a significant predictor for OS and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) on univariate analysis. The number of dissected lymph nodes being < 30 negatively affected the pelvic recurrence-free survival. The only independent predictor on multivariate analysis was older age for DMFS. Although no severe acute toxicity was observed, late grade ≥ 3 toxicity developed in 8 patients.

Conclusion: Small pelvic EBRT produces satisfactory survival and locoregional control with acceptable toxicity, and can be an alternative to whole pelvic EBRT in selected cervical cancer patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000476037DOI Listing
September 2018

Definitive Chemoradiotherapy in Elderly Cervical Cancer Patients: A Multiinstitutional Analysis.

Int J Gynecol Cancer 2017 09;27(7):1446-1454

*Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University Faculty of Medicine, Trabzon; †Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara; ‡Department of Radiotherapy, Gazi Yasargil Training and Research Hospital, Diyarbakir; and §Department of Radiation Oncology, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Adana, Turkey.

Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the prognostic factors for survival and treatment-related toxicities in older (≥65 years) cervical cancer patients treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. In addition, we sought to compare the outcomes between the older elderly (≥75 years) and their younger old counterparts (age, 65-74 years).

Materials And Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records from 269 biopsy-proven nonmetastatic cervical cancer patients treated with external radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy at the departments of radiation oncology in 2 different universities. The prognostic factors for survival, local control, and distant metastasis (DM) were analyzed.

Results: The median follow-up time was 38.8 months (range, 1.5-175.5 months) for the entire cohort and 70.0 months (range, 6.1-175.7 months) for survivors. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and cause-specific survival rates were 66% and 42%, 63% and 39%, and 72% and 55%, respectively. Patients 75 years or older showed significantly worse OS compared with patients aged 65 to 74 years but showed no significant difference in DFS. The 2- and 5-year local control rates were 86% and 71%, respectively. The incidences of DMs at 2 and 5 years were 22% and 30%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, vaginal infiltration and lymph node metastasis were predictive of OS, DFS, local recurrence, and DM. Concomitant chemotherapy was predictive of OS, DFS, and local recurrence, and larger tumor (>4 cm) was a significant prognostic factor for local recurrence. None of the patients had toxicity that necessitated the discontinuation of radiotherapy. All patients were evaluable for acute toxicity, and no grade higher than 3 adverse events occurred during external beam radiation therapy or brachytherapy.

Conclusions: Although age limited the delivery of aggressive treatment, concurrent chemoradiotherapy in elderly patients associated with improved outcomes similar as in younger counterparts without increasing serious acute and late toxicities.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/IGC.0000000000001029DOI Listing
September 2017

Reirradiation of Pediatric Tumors Using Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy.

Technol Cancer Res Treat 2017 04 8;16(2):195-202. Epub 2016 Jul 8.

1 Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for reirradiation of recurrent pediatric tumors.

Methods And Materials: The study included 23 pediatric patients who were reirradiated using hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the radiation oncology department between January 2008 and November 2013. In total, 33 tumors were treated-27 (82%) cranial and 6 (18%) extracranial. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was administered due to recurrent disease in 31 (94%) tumors and residual disease in 2 (6%) tumors. The median total dose was 25 Gy (range: 15-40 Gy), and the median follow-up was 20 months (range: 2-68 months).

Results: The 1-year and 2-year local control rates in the entire study population were 42% and 31%, respectively. The median local control time was 11 months (range: 0-54 months) following hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The patients with tumor response after hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy had significantly longer local control than the patients with post-hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy tumor progression (21 vs 3 months, P < .001). Tumor volume <1.58 cm was correlated (not significantly) with better local control (23 vs 7 months, P = .064).

Conclusion: Reirradiation of pediatric tumors using hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is a safe and effective therapeutic approach. This treatment modality should be considered as a treatment option in selected pediatric patients.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1533034616655952DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5616030PMC
April 2017

The dosimetric impact of implants on the spinal cord dose during stereotactic body radiotherapy.

Radiat Oncol 2016 May 25;11:71. Epub 2016 May 25.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Background: The effects of spinal implants on dose distribution have been studied for conformal treatment plans. However, the dosimetric impact of spinal implants in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatments has not been studied in spatial orientation. In this study we evaluated the effect of spinal implants placed in sawbone vertebra models implanted as in vivo instrumentations.

Methods: Four different spinal implant reconstruction techniques were performed using the standard sawbone lumbar vertebrae model; 1. L2-L4 posterior instrumentation without anterior column reconstruction (PI); 2. L2-L4 anterior instrumentation, L3 corpectomy, and anterior column reconstruction with a titanium cage (AIAC); 3. L2-L4 posterior instrumentation, L3 corpectomy, and anterior column reconstruction with a titanium cage (PIAC); 4. L2-L4 anterior instrumentation, L3 corpectomy, and anterior column reconstruction with chest tubes filled with bone cement (AIABc). The target was defined as the spinous process and lamina of the lumbar (L) 3 vertebra. A thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD, LiF:Mg,Ti) was located on the measurement point anterior to the spinal cord. The prescription dose was 8 Gy and the treatment was administered in a single fraction using a CyberKnife® (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). We performed two different treatment plans. In Plan A beam interaction with the rod was not limited. In plan B the rod was considered a structure of avoidance, and interaction between the rod and beam was prevented. TLD measurements were compared with the point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS).

Results And Discussion: In plan A, the difference between TLD measurement and the dose calculated by the TPS was 1.7 %, 2.8 %, and 2.7 % for the sawbone with no implant, PI, and PIAC models, respectively. For the AIAC model the TLD dose was 13.8 % higher than the TPS dose; the difference was 18.6 % for the AIABc model. In plan B for the AIAC and AIABc models, TLD measurement was 2.5 % and 0.9 % higher than the dose calculated by the TPS, respectively.

Conclusions: Spinal implants may be present in the treatment field in patients scheduled to undergo SBRT. For the types of implants studied herein anterior rod instrumentation resulted in an increase in the spinal cord dose, whereas use of a titanium cage had a minimal effect on dose distribution. While planning SBRT in patients with spinal reconstructions, avoidance of the rod and preventing interaction between the rod and beam might be the optimal solution for preventing unexpectedly high spinal cord doses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13014-016-0649-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4880816PMC
May 2016

Assessing the Quality of Life in Patients With Endometrial Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Radiotherapy.

Int J Gynecol Cancer 2015 Oct;25(8):1526-33

*Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara Ataturk Training and Research Hospital; †Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine; ‡Department of Gynecological Oncology, Etlik Zubeyde Hanim Training and Research Hospital; §Department of Gynecological Oncology, Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine; ∥Department of Gynecological Oncology, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine; and ¶Department of Preventive Oncology, Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: The current study evaluates long-term quality of life (QOL) and sexual function of patients with endometrial cancer who received adjuvant pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or vaginal brachytherapy (BRT).

Materials And Methods: One hundred forty-four endometrial cancer survivors who were treated between January 2000 and December 2009 in our department were included in this study. Median follow-up was 79 months (range, 31-138 months). Fifty-two patients were treated with 45 to 50.4 Gy EBRT, 76 were with BRT, and 16 were with both EBRT and BRT. Brachytherapy was in the form of vaginal cuff BRT with 5 × 550 cGy high dose rate BRT, prescribed to the first 4 cm and whole wall thickness of vagina. Quality of life was assessed using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 and subscales from the supplemental 24-item Cervical Cancer Module.

Results: Vaginal BRT patients reported better physical functioning (P = 0.01), role functioning (P = 0.03), and sexual enjoyment (P = 0.01) compared to EBRT group. Symptom score (P = 0.01), lymphedema (P = 0.03), pain (P = 0.02), and diarrhea (P = 0.009) scores were also higher with EBRT. Vaginal BRT did not worsen symptom scores or sexual functions when added to EBRT. Obese patients experienced higher rates of lymphedema (P = 0.008). Cognitive and role functioning scores were significantly higher in patients with normal body mass index.

Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy negatively affects long-term QOL and sexual functions in endometrial cancer survivors. Vaginal BRT provides higher QOL. Patients with body mass index within normal limits have improved QOL.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/IGC.0000000000000509DOI Listing
October 2015

Determination of optimal planning target volume margins in patients with gynecological cancer.

Phys Med 2015 Nov 3;31(7):708-13. Epub 2015 Jun 3.

Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ankara, Turkey. Electronic address:

Purpose: To define optimal planning target volume (PTV) margins for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) ± knee-heel support (KHS) in patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy.

Methods: Computed tomography (CT) scans ± KHS of 10 patients were taken before and at 3rd and 5th week of treatment, fused and compared with initial IMRT plans.

Results: A PTV margin of 15 mm in anteroposterior (AP) and superoinferior (SI) directions and 5 mm in lateral directions were found to be adequate without any difference between ± KHS except for the SI shifts in CTV-primary at the 3rd week. Five mm margin for iliac CTV was found to be inadequate in 10-20% of patients in SI directions however when 7 mm margin was given for iliac PTV, it was found to be adequate. For presacral CTV, it was found that the most striking shift of the target volume was in the direction of AP. KHS caused significantly less volume of rectum and bladder in the treated volume.

Conclusions: PTV margin of 15 mm in SI and AP, and 5 mm in lateral directions for CTV-primary were found to be adequate. A minimum of 7 mm PTV margin should be given to iliac CTV. The remarkable shifting in presacral CTV was believed to be due to the unforeseen hip malposition of obese patients. The KHS seems not to provide additional beneficial effect in decreasing the shifts both in CTV-primary and lymphatic, however it may have a beneficial effect of decreasing the OAR volume in PTV margins.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmp.2015.05.003DOI Listing
November 2015

Impact of locoregional treatment on survival in patients presented with metastatic breast carcinoma.

Breast 2014 Dec 5;23(6):775-83. Epub 2014 Sep 5.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University, 06100 Ankara, Turkey.

Objectives: In this study, we tried to evaluate the efficacy of locoregional treatment (LRT) in patients with metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC).

Materials And Methods: The medical records of 227 patients with MBC at initial presentation between April 1999 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. The median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range, 27-83 years). Thirty-nine patients (17%) had no LRT. Among patients who had LRT, 2 (1%) had locoregional radiotherapy (RT) alone, 54 (29%) had surgery alone [mastectomy, n = 50; breast conserving surgery (BCS), n = 4] and 132 (70%) had surgery (mastectomy, n = 119; BCS, n = 13) followed by locoregional RT.

Results: The median follow-up time was 35 months (range, 4-149 months). Five-year OS and PFS rates were 44% and 20%, respectively. In both univariate and multivariate analysis LRT per se did not affect OS and PFS rates. However, the 5-year OS and PFS rates were significantly higher in patients treated with locoregional RT than the ones who were not. The corresponding rates were 56% vs. 24% for OS and 27% vs. 7% for PFS (p < 0.001). Median survival was 67 months and 37 months, respectively.

Conclusion: Our study showed that patients with MBC who received postoperative locoregional RT may have a survival advantage compared with patients who were only treated by surgery. A phase III trial testing the role of adjuvant locoregional RT may help to distinguish patients who will benefit from adjuvant RT.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.breast.2014.08.008DOI Listing
December 2014