Publications by authors named "Melinda Urkon"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Computer-assisted UHPLC method development and optimization for the determination of albendazole and its related substances.

J Pharm Biomed Anal 2021 Sep 11;203:114203. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

George Emil Palade University of Medicine, Pharmacy, Science, and Technology of Targu Mures, Gh. Marinescu 38, RO-540139, Tîrgu Mureș, Romania; Sz-imfidum Ltd, RO-525401, Lunga No. 504, Romania. Electronic address:

Computer-aided ultrahigh performance liquid chromatographic (UHPLC) method development and optimization was undertaken in order to replace an underperforming European Pharmacopoeia method for the determination of albendazole and its related substances. In the preliminary screening, a temperature-gradient time bidimensional model was chosen to aid selection of the proper stationary phase. Hereinafter temperature-gradient time-ternary composition and temperature-gradient time-pH tridimensional models were applied for the optimization of critical method parameters. The simulation and in silico robustness testing were realized using DryLab modeling software. The final method was validated for quantification of impurities and assay of the active substance according to the current ICH guidance. The validated methods were tested on a real, commercial tablet formulation. The experimental design-based and software-assisted method development proved to be a fast and reliable way of replacing a method with inadequate selectivity and long runtime with a robust UHPLC-based method, which offers baseline separation for all monitored impurities in 10 min. Results confirm that software-based chromatographic modelling can not only speed up the analytical method development process, but also improve the reliability of the developed method.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpba.2021.114203DOI Listing
September 2021

Serum Osteoprotegerin and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Are Related to High Arterial Stiffness in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction.

Diagnostics (Basel) 2021 Apr 24;11(5). Epub 2021 Apr 24.

Department of Biochemistry and Environmental Chemistry, George Emil Palade University of Medicine, Pharmacy, Sciences and Technology of Targu Mures, 540142 Targu Mures, Romania.

Arterial stiffness (AS) is a complex vascular phenomenon with consequences for central hemodynamics and left-ventricular performance. Circulating biomarkers have been associated with AS; however, their value in heart failure is poorly characterized. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical and biomarker correlates of AS in the setting of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). In 78 hospitalized, hemodynamically stable patients (20 women, 58 men, mean age 65.8 ± 1.41 years) with HFrEF, AS was measured using aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV). Serum OPG, RANKL, sclerostin, and DKK-1 were determined, and the relationships between the clinical variables, vascular-calcification-related biomarkers, and PWV were evaluated by correlation analysis and linear and logistic regression models. OPG and the OPG/RANKL ratio were significantly higher in the group of patients ( = 37, 47.4%) with increased PWV (>10 m/s). PWV was positively correlated with age, left-ventricular ejection fraction, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), and negatively correlated with the glomerular filtration rate. OPG and cIMT were significantly associated with PWV in the logistic regression models when adjusted for hypertension, EF, and the presence of atherosclerotic manifestations. Elevated serum OPG, together with cIMT, were significantly related to increased AS in the setting of HFrEF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11050764DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8145213PMC
April 2021

Effects of Chronic Cannabidiol Treatment in the Rat Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress Model of Depression.

Biomolecules 2020 05 22;10(5). Epub 2020 May 22.

Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacy, George Emil Palade University of Medicine, Pharmacy, Science, and Technology of Targu Mures, 540142 Târgu Mureș, Romania.

Several neuropharmacological actions of cannabidiol (CBD) due to the modulation of the endocannabinoid system as well as direct serotonergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic actions have recently been identified. The current study aimed to reveal the effect of a long-term CBD treatment in the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model of depression. Adult male Wistar rats (n = 24) were exposed to various stressors on a daily basis in order to induce anhedonia and anxiety-like behaviors. CBD (10 mg/kg body weight) was administered by daily intraperitoneal injections for 28 days (n = 12). The effects of the treatment were assessed on body weight, sucrose preference, and exploratory and anxiety-related behavior in the open field (OF) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Hair corticosterone was also assayed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. At the end of the experiment, CBD-treated rats showed a higher rate of body weight gain (5.94% vs. 0.67%) and sucrose preference compared to controls. A significant increase in vertical exploration and a trend of increase in distance traveled in the OF test were observed in the CBD-treated group compared to the vehicle-treated group. The EPM test did not reveal any differences between the groups. Hair corticosterone levels increased in the CBD-treated group, while they decreased in controls compared to baseline (+36.01% vs. -45.91%). In conclusion, CBD exerted a prohedonic effect in rats subjected to CUMS, demonstrated by the increased sucrose preference after three weeks of treatment. The reversal of the effect of CUMS on hair corticosterone concentrations might also point toward an anxiolytic or antidepressant-like effect of CBD, but this needs further confirmation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biom10050801DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7277553PMC
May 2020