Publications by authors named "Melek Gamze Aksu"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Treatment outcomes of prostate cancer patients with Gleason score 8-10 treated with definitive radiotherapy : TROD 09-001 multi-institutional study.

Strahlenther Onkol 2019 Oct 29;195(10):882-893. Epub 2019 May 29.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, 06100, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: To validate the clinical outcomes and prognostic factors in prostate cancer (PCa) patients with Gleason score (GS) 8-10 disease treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) + androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in the modern era.

Methods: Institutional databases of biopsy proven 641 patients with GS 8-10 PCa treated between 2000 and 2015 were collected from 11 institutions. In this multi-institutional Turkish Radiation Oncology Group study, a standard database sheet was sent to each institution for patient enrollment. The inclusion criteria were, T1-T3N0M0 disease according to AJCC (American Joint Committee on Cancer) 2010 Staging System, no prior diagnosis of malignancy, at least 70 Gy total irradiation dose to prostate ± seminal vesicles delivered with either three-dimensional conformal RT or intensity-modulated RT and patients receiving ADT.

Results: The median follow-up time was 5.9 years (range 0.4-18.2 years); 5‑year overall survival (OS), biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS) rates were 88%, 78%, and 79%, respectively. Higher RT doses (≥78 Gy) and longer ADT duration (≥2 years) were significant predictors for improved DMFS, whereas advanced stage was a negative prognosticator for DMFS in patients with GS 9-10.

Conclusions: Our results validated the fact that oncologic outcomes after radical EBRT significantly differ in men with GS 8 versus those with GS 9-10 prostate cancer. We found that EBRT dose was important predictive factor regardless of ADT period. Patients receiving 'non-optimal treatment' (RT doses <78 Gy and ADT period <2 years) had the worst treatment outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00066-019-01476-zDOI Listing
October 2019

Clinical prognostic factors of adjuvant radiation therapy for low-grade gliomas: results of 10 years survival.

Int J Clin Exp Med 2014 15;7(5):1336-43. Epub 2014 May 15.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University School of Medicine Antalya, Turkey.

Objective: Low-grade gliomas compose 5-20% of all glial tumors. The prognosis of the disease can be anticipated by specific clinical factors determined during diagnosis. For this purpose, our study investigated the clinical prognostic factors for low-grade gliomas.

Methods: Patients diagnosed with histopathologically confirmed low-grade glioma, followed by Akdeniz University and Süleyman Demirel University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology between 1999 and 2013 were included in the study. The examination of survival by single variable analyses were performed by log rank test. For the multivariate analysis, independent factors for the prediction of survival by using possible factors determined by previous analyses were examined by using Cox regression analysis.

Results: Fifty-five patients were included in the study. The mean follow-up period was determined as 60 ± 57 (4.5-168.1) months. Five-year overall survival was determined as 69% and 10-year overall survival was determined as 40%. When the potential prognostic factors were studied in Cox regression model, pre-radiotherapy age below 40 and gross-total excision were determined as good prognostic factors.

Conclusion: We demonstrated that the aggressive surgical resection provided a better survival advantage both in single variable analyses and multivariate analyses. Consequently, although the low number of patients was the most important limitation in our study, we consider that patient age and extent of resection are the most important clinical prognostic factors in low-grade gliomas.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4073753PMC
July 2014

Effect of complementary and alternative medicine during radiotherapy on radiation toxicity.

Support Care Cancer 2008 Apr 15;16(4):415-9. Epub 2008 Jan 15.

Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Antalya, Turkey.

Goal Of Work: To examine the frequency and types of complementary and alternative medicine use in patients undergoing radiotherapy and to analyze the effects these therapies have on the toxicities of radiotherapy.

Materials And Methods: A total of 210 consecutive cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy were included. After radiation therapy, each patient completed a standard questionnaire, and the association between radiation toxicity and complementary and alternative medicine use was analyzed.

Main Results: Among the study population, 44.3% of patients reported using at least one form of complementary and alternative medicine during radiotherapy. The most commonly chosen complementary and alternative medicine was stinging nettle. Complementary and alternative medicine use decreased lower gastrointestinal (F = 3.26, P = .009) and genitourinary toxicities (F = 2.38, P = .043), while it increased laryngeal toxicity (F = 2.63, P = .028). A significant correlation between the type of complementary and alternative medicine used and the degree of these toxicities was not demonstrated.

Conclusions: Use of complementary and alternative medicine among cancer patients during radiation therapy may affect the degree of radiation toxicity. Further randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to determine the benefits and risks of complementary and alternative medicine use during radiation therapy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-007-0390-0DOI Listing
April 2008