Publications by authors named "Meisam Sanoobar"

7 Publications

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Effect of Calcium and Vitamin D Co-supplementation on Blood Pressure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Clin Ther 2020 03 14;42(3):e45-e63. Epub 2020 Feb 14.

Department of Nutritional Science, School of Nutritional Science and Food Technology, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran. Electronic address:

Purpose: Vitamin D and calcium insufficiency has been related to elevated blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular complications. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigates the effect of calcium and vitamin D co-supplementation on BP.

Methods: A systematic search was conducted of electronic databases, including Web of Sciences, MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, along with searches of gray literature and reference lists from included trials. There were no language restrictions, and the databases were searched from inception to October 2019. Randomized controlled trials, using calcium and vitamin D co-supplementation and reporting mean systolic BP and/or diastolic BP (DBP) with SDs, were included in the systematic review. Articles were evaluated independently by 2 researchers based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. A random effects model was conducted to synthesize the data.

Findings: Eight trials were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis of these 8 trials indicated a nonsignificant reduction in systolic BP in the calcium and vitamin D co-supplementation group compared with control (standardized mean difference, -0.23; 95% CI, -0.52 to 0.06). Conversely, there was a statistically significant decrease in DBP (standardized mean difference, -0.29; 95% CI, -0.55 to -0.02). Subgroup analysis suggested that young adults achieve a greater reduction in DBP than other age groups.

Implications: Calcium and vitamin D co-supplementation can modulate DBP and should be investigated more specifically in large, well-designed trials of hypertensive populations. (Clin Ther. 2020;42:XXX-XXX) © 2020 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinthera.2020.01.005DOI Listing
March 2020

The Relationship of Disordered Eating Attitudes With Body Composition and Anthropometric Indices in Physical Education Students.

Iran Red Crescent Med J 2015 Nov 14;17(11):e20727. Epub 2015 Nov 14.

Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences and Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

Background: Abnormal eating behavior, unhealthy weight control methods, and eating disordered symptoms have risen among college students.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine disordered eating attitudes and their relationship with anthropometric and body composition indices in physical education students in Tabriz, the capital of East Azerbaijan province, Iran.

Patients And Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 210 physical education students, 105 males and 105 females aged 18 to 25, who were selected by systematic random sampling from physical education faculty of Tabriz University in Tabriz, Iran, in 2013. Eating attitude test (EAT-26) was used for the assessment of disordered eating attitudes. In addition, anthropometric and body composition indices were assessed.

Results: About 10% of the studied subject had disturbed eating attitudes; significantly more males (15.4%) reported an EAT-26 ≥ 20 (disordered eating attitudes) than females (4.8%) (P < 0.05). In males, the EAT-26 score was positively correlated with weist perimeter (WP) (r = 0.21, P < 0.05) and the waist-to-hip ratio (r = 0.26, P < 0.01). In females, the EAT-26 score was positively correlated with weight (r = 0.19, P < 0.05) and the WP (r = 0.28, P < 0.01). In females, weight (P < 0.05), body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.05), WP (P < 0.01), and waist-to-hip ratio (P < 0.05) were significantly different between disordered eating attitude and healthy subjects, while in males there was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the anthropometric and body composition indices.

Conclusions: Abnormal eating attitude was notable among physical education students in Tabriz, Iran. It seems that some anthropometric indices such as BMI and central obesity indices were related to the increase of disordered eating attitude.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5812/ircmj.20727DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4698139PMC
November 2015

Coenzyme Q10 as a treatment for fatigue and depression in multiple sclerosis patients: A double blind randomized clinical trial.

Nutr Neurosci 2016 20;19(3):138-43. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

c Neurosciences Research Center , Tabriz University of Medical Sciences , Tabriz , Iran.

Objectives: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of central nervous system which is accompanied with disability and negative life style changes such as fatigue and depression. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on fatigue and depression in patients with MS.

Methods: We performed a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to determine the effect of CoQ10 supplement (500 mg/day) vs. placebo for 12 weeks. Fatigue symptoms were quantified by means of fatigue severity scale (FSS) and the Beck depression inventory (BDI) was used to assess depressive symptoms.

Results: A significant decrease of FSS was observed in CoQ10 group during the intervention (P = 0.001) and significant increase of FSS change was observed within placebo group (P = 0.001). Repeated measure analysis of variance showed a significant time-by-treatment interaction for FSS (baseline 41.5 ± 15.6 vs. endpoint 45 ± 13.6; F1,45 = 55.23, P < 0.001, η(2) = 0.56) and BDI (baseline 17.8 ± 12.2 vs. endpoint 20.4 ± 11.4; F1,45 = 40.3, P < 0.001, η(2) = 0.48), indicating significant decrease of FSS and BDI in CoQ10 group compared to placebo group.

Conclusion: Our study suggests that CoQ10 supplementation (500 mg/day) can improve fatigue and depression in patients with multiple sclerosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1476830515Y.0000000002DOI Listing
January 2017

Does lipoic acid consumption affect the cytokine profile in multiple sclerosis patients: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial.

Neuroimmunomodulation 2014 6;21(6):291-6. Epub 2014 May 6.

Neurosciences Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Background: A limited amount of data exists regarding the effect of lipoic acid (LA), an oral antioxidant supplement, on cytokine profiles among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients.

Objective: We aimed to assess the effect of daily consumption of LA on the cytokine profiles in MS patients.

Methods: In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial, 52 relapsing-remitting MS patients with an age range of 18-50 years were recruited into 2 groups: LA consumption (1,200 mg/day) or placebo. Patients followed their prescribed supplements for 12 weeks. Fasting blood samples for cytokine profile measurement were collected at baseline and after the intervention. Anthropometric parameters were measured based on the standard guidelines.

Results: INF-γ, ICAM-1, TGF-β and IL-4 were significantly reduced in the LA group compared to the placebo group [(INF-γ: 0.82 ± 0.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.2 pg/ml, p < 0.0001), (ICAM-1: 20.2 ± 9.4 vs. 8 ± 10 ng/ml, p = 0.0001), (TGF-β: 103.1 ± 20.2 vs. 54.9 ± 26 ng/ml, p < 0.0001) and (IL-4: 0.1 ± 0.1 vs. 1.02 ± 1.7 ng/ml, p = 0.0112)]. No significant changes in TNF-α, IL-6, EDSS and MMP-9 were found between the LA and placebo groups (p = 0.6, p = 0.8, p = 0.09 and p = 0.8, respectively).

Conclusion: The results suggested that consumption of 1,200 mg LA per day beneficially affects several inflammatory cytokines including INF-γ, ICAM-1 TGF-β and IL-4. Further investigations are needed to verify the beneficial role of LA on other cytokine profiles among MS patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000356145DOI Listing
March 2015

Coenzyme Q10 supplementation ameliorates inflammatory markers in patients with multiple sclerosis: a double blind, placebo, controlled randomized clinical trial.

Nutr Neurosci 2015 May 10;18(4):169-76. Epub 2014 Jan 10.

Objectives: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated neurodegenerative disease of central nervous system and recent studies show that inflammatory processes are highly associated with neurodegeneration in the brain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in patients with MS.

Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical study was performed among 48 patients with relapsing-remitting MS. Subjects were randomly assigned to a placebo group (n = 24) or coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10)-supplemented group (500 mg/day, n = 24). The intervention was administered for 12 weeks. Peripheral blood samples were collected at baseline and after 12-week intervention, to measure inflammatory (tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4 and TGF-β) markers.

Results: Forty-five patients completed the study. After 12 weeks of intervention, the TNF-α levels (P = 0.003) decreased significantly in the CoQ10 group. Subjects in the CoQ10 group had significantly lower IL-6 levels (P = 0.037), compared to the placebo group. CoQ10 supplementation also resulted in decreased serum levels of MMP-9 as compared to the placebo group (P = 0.011). However, CoQ10 supplementation did not alter the IL-4 and TGF-β levels (P = 0.16 and P = 0.81, respectively).

Discussion: CoQ10 supplementation at a dosage of 500 mg appears to decrease the inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-6, and MMP-9) in patients with MS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1476830513Y.0000000106DOI Listing
May 2015

Coenzyme Q10 supplementation reduces oxidative stress and increases antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

Int J Neurosci 2013 Nov 17;123(11):776-82. Epub 2013 Jun 17.

1Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutritional Sciences & Dietetics, Tehran University of Medical Sciences , Tehran , Islamic Republic of Iran.

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of central nervous system in which a higher oxidative stress may contribute to its pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with MS.

Materials And Methods: We performed a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trail to determine the effect of CoQ10 supplement (500 mg/day, n = 24) versus placebo (controls, n = 24) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood samples were taken before and after a 12-week intervention to analyze malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] activity.

Results: Forty-five subjects with MS completed intervention study. After 12 weeks, CoQ10-treated patients had significant increase in SOD activity (p = 0.013); and decrease in MDA levels (P=0.003) compared with controls. Despite the significant effect of CoQ10 supplementation on plasma TAC (p = 0.010), no significant differences were found between the two groups. CoQ10 supplementation did not affect GPx activity.

Conclusion: Present study suggests that CoQ10 supplements at a dose of 500 mg/day can decrease oxidative stress and increase antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with relapsing-remitting MS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00207454.2013.801844DOI Listing
November 2013

Effect of lipoic acid consumption on oxidative stress among multiple sclerosis patients: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

Nutr Neurosci 2014 Jan 26;17(1):16-20. Epub 2013 Nov 26.

Objectives: Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative and demyelinating disease of central nervous system. High levels of oxidative stress are associated with inflammation and play an important role in pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. This double-blind, randomized controlled clinical study was carried out to determine the effect of daily consumption of lipoic acid on oxidative stress among multiple sclerosis patients.

Methods: A total of 52 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, aged 18-50 years with Expanded Disability Status Scale ≤5.5 were assigned to consume either lipoic acid (1200 mg/day) or placebo capsules for 12 weeks. Fasting blood samples were collected before the first dose taken and 12 hours after the last. Dietary intakes were obtained by using 3-day dietary records.

Results: Consumption of lipoic acid resulted in a significant improvement of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in comparison to the placebo group (P = 0.004). Although a significant change of TAC (-1511 mmol/L, P = 0.001) was found within lipoic acid group, other markers of oxidative stress including superoxide dismutase activity, glutathione peroxidase activity, and malondialdehyde levels were not affected by lipoic acid consumption.

Discussion: These results suggest that 1200 mg of lipoic acid improves serum TAC among multiple sclerosis patients but does not affect other markers of oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/1476830513Y.0000000060DOI Listing
January 2014