Publications by authors named "Meipeng Zhu"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Inhibiting Monoacylglycerol Lipase Suppresses RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis and Alleviates Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss.

Front Cell Dev Biol 2021 12;9:640867. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

Department of Orthopedics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.

Osteoporosis is a common chronic metabolic bone disease characterized by reduced trabecular bone and increased bone fragility. Monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) is a lipolytic enzyme to catalyze the hydrolysis of monoglycerides and specifically degrades the 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG). Previous studies have identified that 2-AG is the mainly source for arachidonic acid and the most abundant endogenous agonist of cannabinoid receptors. Considering the close relationship between inflammatory mediators/cannabinoid receptors and bone metabolism, we speculated that MAGL may play a role in the osteoclast differentiation. In the present study, we found that MAGL protein expression increased during osteoclast differentiation. MAGL knockdown by adenovirus-mediated shRNA in bone marrow-derived macrophages demonstrated the suppressive effects of MAGL on osteoclast formation and bone resorption. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of MAGL by JZL184 suppressed osteoclast differentiation, bone resorption, and osteoclast-specific gene expression. Activation of the Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathways was inhibited by JZL184 and deletion of MAGL. Our study indicated that JZL184 ameliorated bone loss in an ovariectomized mouse model. Furthermore, overexpressing H1 calponin partially alleviated the inhibition caused by JZL184 or MAGL deletion on osteoclastogenesis. Therefore, we conclude that targeting MAGL may be a novel therapeutic strategy for osteoporosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2021.640867DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7994615PMC
March 2021

Pristimerin Suppresses RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis and Ameliorates Ovariectomy-Induced Bone Loss.

Front Pharmacol 2020 15;11:621110. Epub 2021 Jan 15.

Department of Orthopedics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.

Osteoporosis is characterized by bone loss and destruction of trabecular architecture, which greatly increases the burden on the healthcare system. Excessive activation of osteoclasts is an important cause of osteoporosis, and suppression of osteoclastogenesis is helpful for the treatment of osteoporosis. Pristimerin, a natural compound, possesses numerous pharmacological effects via inactivating the NF-κB and MAPK pathways, which are closely related to osteoclastogenesis process. However, the relationship between Pristimerin and osteoclastogenesis requires further investigation. In this research, we examined the effect of Pristimerin on osteoclastogenesis and investigated the related mechanisms. Our results showed Pristimerin inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation and osteoclastic bone resorption , with decreased expression of osteoclastogenesis-related markers including c-Fos, NFATc1, TRAP, Cathepsin K, and MMP-9 at both mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, Pristimerin suppressed NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and activated the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2/heme oxygenase 1 (Nrf2/HO-1) signaling during osteoclastogenesis. Our experiments showed that Pristimerin remarkably ameliorated ovariectomy-induced bone loss, reduced serum levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and RANKL, and increased serum level of osteoprotegerin (OPG). Therefore, our research indicated that Pristimerin is a potential chemical for the treatment of osteoporosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2020.621110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7898668PMC
January 2021

Vinpocetine inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and attenuates ovariectomy-induced bone loss.

Biomed Pharmacother 2020 Mar 15;123:109769. Epub 2019 Dec 15.

Department of Orthopedics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430030, China. Electronic address:

Osteoporosis is a result of impaired bone formation and/or excessive bone resorption. Osteoclasts are the only cells in the body that have a bone resorption function. Inhibiting osteoclast activity and differentiation is a way to treat osteoporosis. The current pharmacological treatment for osteoporosis has many shortcomings, and more effective treatments are needed. Vinpocetine (Vinp), a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has been used to treat cerebrovascular disorders and cognitive impairment for a long time. Vinp inhibits mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-dependent inflammatory responses and oxidative damage in which osteoclasts are often involved. However, the effects of Vinp on the regulation of osteoclast activity remain unknown. In this study, we found that Vinp significantly inhibited receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast and F-actin formation and decreased osteoclastic bone resorption in vitro. Vinp also suppressed the expression of osteoclast-specific genes, including NFATc1, c-Fos, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and cathepsin K (CTSK) at both the mRNA and protein levels. Vinp reduced activation of NF-κB, MAPK, and AKT signaling during osteoclastogenesis and prevented the production of reactive oxygen species with increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, heme oxygenase 1, and NAD(P)H:quinone acceptor oxidoreductase 1 expression. Animal experiments consistently demonstrated that Vinp treatment significantly attenuated ovariectomy-induced bone loss with a decrease in the osteoclast number and decreases in serum levels of RANKL, TRAP, interleukin-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, as well as increased serum levels of osteoprotegerin. Taken together, our findings reveal that Vinp may be a potential pharmacological choice for preventing and treating osteoporosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopha.2019.109769DOI Listing
March 2020

Hesperetin suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced bone loss.

J Cell Physiol 2019 07 11;234(7):11009-11022. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Department of Orthopedics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.

Destructive bone diseases caused by osteolysis are increasing in incidence. They are characterized by an excessive imbalance of osteoclast formation and activation. During osteolysis, the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are triggered by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), inflammatory factors, and oxidative stress. Previous studies have indicated that the common flavanone glycoside compound hesperetin exhibits anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity by inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. However, the direct relationship between hesperetin and osteolysis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hesperetin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoporosis and elucidated the related mechanisms. Hesperetin effectively suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis, osteoclastic bone resorption, and F-actin ring formation in a dose-dependent manner. It also significantly suppressed the expression of osteoclast-specific markers including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, matrix metalloproteinase-9, cathepsin K, c-Fos, and nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1. Furthermore, it inhibited osteoclastogenesis by inhibiting activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling, scavenging reactive oxygen species, and activating the nuclear factor E2 p45-related factor 2/heme oxygenase 1 (Nrf2/HO-1) signaling pathway. Consistent with in vitro results, hesperetin effectively ameliorated LPS-induced bone loss, reduced osteoclast numbers, and decreased the RANKL/OPG ratio in vivo. As such, our results suggest that hesperetin may be a great candidate for developing a novel drug for destructive bone diseases such as periodontal disease, tumor bone metastasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoporosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcp.27924DOI Listing
July 2019