Publications by authors named "Mehrzad MohsseniPour"

4 Publications

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Characterization of SARS-CoV-2 different variants and related morbidity and mortality: a systematic review.

Eur J Med Res 2021 Jun 8;26(1):51. Epub 2021 Jun 8.

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Introduction: Coronavirus Disease-2019 (SARS-CoV-2) started its devastating trajectory into a global pandemic in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Ever since, several variants of SARS-CoV-2 have been identified. In the present review, we aimed to characterize the different variants of SARS-CoV-2 and explore the related morbidity and mortality.

Methods: A systematic review including the current evidence related to different variants of SARS-CoV-2 and the related morbidity and mortality was conducted through a systematic search utilizing the keywords in the online databases including Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Science Direct; we retrieved all related papers and reports published in English from December 2019 to September 2020.

Results: A review of identified articles has shown three main genomic variants, including type A, type B, and type C. we also identified three clades including S, V, and G. Studies have demonstrated that the C14408T and A23403G alterations in the Nsp12 and S proteins are the most prominent alterations in the world, leading to life-threatening mutations.The spike D614G amino acid change has become the most common variant since December 2019. From missense mutations found from Gujarat SARS-CoV-2 genomes, C28854T, deleterious mutation in the nucleocapsid (N) gene was significantly associated with patients' mortality. The other significant deleterious variant (G25563T) is found in patients located in Orf3a and has a potential role in viral pathogenesis.

Conclusion: Overall, researchers identified several SARS-CoV-2 variants changing clinical manifestations and increasing the transmissibility, morbidity, and mortality of COVID-19. This should be considered in current practice and interventions to combat the pandemic and prevent related morbidity and mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40001-021-00524-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8185313PMC
June 2021

Genetic susceptibility of COVID-19: a systematic review of current evidence.

Eur J Med Res 2021 May 20;26(1):46. Epub 2021 May 20.

Graduation Program of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso, Cuiabá, Brazil.

Introduction: While COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread worldwide, researchers have linked patterns of traits to poor disease outcomes. Risk factors for COVID-19 include asthma, elderly age, being pregnant, having any underlying diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and experiencing lifelong systemic racism. Recently, connections to certain genes have also been found, although the susceptibility has not yet been established. We aimed to investigate the available evidence for the genetic susceptibility to COVID-19.

Methods: This study was a systematic review of current evidence to investigate the genetic susceptibility of COVID-19. By systematic search and utilizing the keywords in the online databases including Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Science Direct, we retrieved all the related papers and reports published in English from December 2019 to September 2020.

Results: According to the findings, COVID-19 uses the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor for cell entry. Previous studies have shown that people with ACE2 polymorphism who have type 2 transmembrane serine proteases (TMPRSS2) are at high risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Also, two studies have shown that males are more likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2 than females. Besides, research has also shown that patients possessing HLA-B*15:03 genotype may become immune to the infection.

Conclusion: Combing through the genome, several genes related to immune system's response were related to the severity and susceptibility to the COVID-19. In conclusion, a correlation was found between the ACE2 levels and the susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40001-021-00516-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8135169PMC
May 2021

Late Complications of COVID-19; a Systematic Review of Current Evidence.

Arch Acad Emerg Med 2021 20;9(1):e14. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Department of Global Health and Socioepidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto. Japan.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7927752PMC
January 2021

Reinfection risk of novel coronavirus (COVID-19): A systematic ‎review of current evidence.

World J Virol 2020 Dec;9(5):79-90

Université Aix-Marseille, Institutde Neuro-physiopathologie (INP), UMR 7051, Faculté de ‎Pharmacie, 27 Bd Jean Moulin, Marseille 546789235, France.

Background: There is recently a concern regarding the reinfection and reactivation of previously reCoVered coronavirus disease 2019 (CoVID-19) patients.

Aim: To summarize the recent findings and reports of CoVID-19 reinfection in patients previously reCoVered from the disease.

Methods: This study was a systematic review of current evidence conducted in August 2020. The authors studied the probable reinfection risk of novel coronavirus (CoVID-19). We performed a systematic search using the keywords in online databases. The investigation adheres to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist to ensure the reliability and validity of this study and results.

Results: We reviewed 31 studies. Eight studies described reCoVered patients with reinfection. Only one study reported reinfected patients who died. In 26 studies, there was no information about the status of the patients. Several studies indicated that reinfection is not probable and that post-infection immunity is at least temporary and short.

Conclusion: Based on our review, we concluded that a positive polymerase chain reaction retest could be due to several reasons and should not always be considered as reinfection or reactivation of the disease. Most relevant studies in positive retest patients have shown relative and probably temporary immunity after the reCoVery of the disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5501/wjv.v9.i5.79DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7747024PMC
December 2020