Publications by authors named "Mehrab Ali"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Comprehensive Membrane Interactome Mapping of Sho1p Reveals Fps1p as a Novel Key Player in the Regulation of the HOG Pathway in S. cerevisiae.

J Mol Biol 2015 Jun 30;427(11):2088-103. Epub 2015 Jan 30.

Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E1, Canada; Department of Biochemistry, University of Toronto, Medical Science Building, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada; Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada. Electronic address:

Sho1p, an integral membrane protein, plays a vital role in the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Activated under conditions of high osmotic stress, it interacts with other HOG pathway proteins to mediate cell signaling events, ensuring that yeast cells can adapt and remain viable. In an attempt to further understand how the function of Sho1p is regulated through its protein-protein interactions (PPIs), we identified 49 unique Sho1p PPIs through the use of membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH), an assay specifically suited to identify PPIs of full-length integral membrane proteins in their native membrane environment. Secondary validation by literature search, or two complementary PPI assays, confirmed 80% of these interactions, resulting in a high-quality Sho1p interactome. This set of putative PPIs included both previously characterized interactors, along with a large subset of interactors that have not been previously identified as binding to Sho1p. The SH3 domain of Sho1p was found to be important for binding to many of these interactors. One particular novel interactor of interest is the glycerol transporter Fps1p, which was shown to require the SH3 domain of Sho1p for binding via its N-terminal soluble regulatory domain. Furthermore, we found that Fps1p is involved in the positive regulation of Sho1p function and plays a role in the phosphorylation of the downstream kinase Hog1p. This study represents the largest membrane interactome analysis of Sho1p to date and complements past studies on the HOG pathway by increasing our understanding of Sho1p regulation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2015.01.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5331858PMC
June 2015

Genetic interaction maps in Escherichia coli reveal functional crosstalk among cell envelope biogenesis pathways.

PLoS Genet 2011 Nov 17;7(11):e1002377. Epub 2011 Nov 17.

Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, Donnelly Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium) and prototrophic (minimal medium) culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among > 235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens) and an important target.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1002377DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3219608PMC
November 2011

Global functional atlas of Escherichia coli encompassing previously uncharacterized proteins.

PLoS Biol 2009 Apr;7(4):e96

Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, Terrence Donnelly Center for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

One-third of the 4,225 protein-coding genes of Escherichia coli K-12 remain functionally unannotated (orphans). Many map to distant clades such as Archaea, suggesting involvement in basic prokaryotic traits, whereas others appear restricted to E. coli, including pathogenic strains. To elucidate the orphans' biological roles, we performed an extensive proteomic survey using affinity-tagged E. coli strains and generated comprehensive genomic context inferences to derive a high-confidence compendium for virtually the entire proteome consisting of 5,993 putative physical interactions and 74,776 putative functional associations, most of which are novel. Clustering of the respective probabilistic networks revealed putative orphan membership in discrete multiprotein complexes and functional modules together with annotated gene products, whereas a machine-learning strategy based on network integration implicated the orphans in specific biological processes. We provide additional experimental evidence supporting orphan participation in protein synthesis, amino acid metabolism, biofilm formation, motility, and assembly of the bacterial cell envelope. This resource provides a "systems-wide" functional blueprint of a model microbe, with insights into the biological and evolutionary significance of previously uncharacterized proteins.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.1000096DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2672614PMC
April 2009

eSGA: E. coli synthetic genetic array analysis.

Nat Methods 2008 Sep;5(9):789-95

Banting and Best Department of Medical Research, Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, University of Toronto, 160 College Street, Toronto M5S 3E1, Canada.

Physical and functional interactions define the molecular organization of the cell. Genetic interactions, or epistasis, tend to occur between gene products involved in parallel pathways or interlinked biological processes. High-throughput experimental systems to examine genetic interactions on a genome-wide scale have been devised for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, but have not been reported previously for prokaryotes. Here we describe the development of a quantitative screening procedure for monitoring bacterial genetic interactions based on conjugation of Escherichia coli deletion or hypomorphic strains to create double mutants on a genome-wide scale. The patterns of synthetic sickness and synthetic lethality (aggravating genetic interactions) we observed for certain double mutant combinations provided information about functional relationships and redundancy between pathways and enabled us to group bacterial gene products into functional modules.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.1239DOI Listing
September 2008