Publications by authors named "Mehmet Kaymakoglu"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Preliminary results of rigid fixation (locking plate/screw) after triple pelvic osteotomy without a hip spica cast: A modified fixation method in 21 patients.

Jt Dis Relat Surg 2021 11;32(2):454-460. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

Hacettepe Üniversitesi Erişkin Hastanesi, Ortopedi ve Travmatoloji Sekreterliği, 06100 Sıhhiye, Ankara, Türkiye.

Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate whether rigid fixation after triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO) utilizing a 3.5-mm locking plate and screws without hip spica cast can provide enough stability and prevent correction loss in pediatric patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) and Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD).

Patients And Methods: A total of 21 hips of 21 pediatric patients (9 males, 12 females; mean age: 9.3±2.0 years; range, 6 to 14 years) who underwent rigid fixation with locking plate/screws after TPO for DDH and LCPD between June 2015 and October 2018 were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperative, immediate postoperative, and six-month follow-up anteroposterior radiographs were compared for the Wiberg's center-edge angle (CE), Sharp angle, acetabular coverage of the femoral head (ACFH), and center-head distance discrepancy (CHDD). The patient demographics, surgery time, perioperative complications were evaluated.

Results: Underlying diagnosis were DDH in 14 patients and LCPD in seven patients. In patients with DDH, postoperative evaluation showed significant increase in the mean CE angle (5.6±16.1° vs. 30.5±9.3°, respectively) and ACFH (46.4±16.8% vs. 84.5±12.1%, respectively), and a significant decrease in the mean Sharp angle (55.3±6.2° vs. 35.6±7.8°, respectively) and CHDD (14.6±10.7% vs. 6.2±5.6%, respectively). The final follow-up revealed that there was no correction loss in these parameters. In the patients with LCPD, postoperative evaluation showed a significant increase in the mean CE (20.1±11.1° vs. 38.3±9.6°, respectively) and ACFH (62.9±18% vs. 91.4±10.1%, respectively), and a significant decrease in the mean Sharp angle (46±3.6° vs. 25.2±5.5°, respectively). The final follow-up revealed that there was no correction loss in radiological parameters. No perioperative complications were noted.

Conclusion: Our study results suggest that rigid fixation construct with a 3.5-mm locking plate and screws without hip spica cast can provide adequate stability to allow early mobilization following TPO in children without any loss of correction, until bony healing at the osteotomy sites.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.52312/jdrs.2021.1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8343833PMC
July 2021

Characteristics of femoroacetabular impingement morphology and relation with skeletal maturity among asymptomatic adolescents.

Acta Orthop Belg 2021 Mar;87(1):47-54

The aim of this study was to analyze presence of the morphological characteristics and prevalence of FAI in asymptomatic adolescents and assess the relation of skeletal maturation with development of FAI morphology. Abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) of 265 adolescents (9-19 years old) who were admitted to the emergency department between 2011 and 2016 were evaluated retrospectively. Radial reformatted CT images from the femoral neck were created using the multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) method. The femoral neck was divided into 12 segments and alpha angle (AA), femoral head-neck ratio (FHNR) and center-edge angle (CEA) were measured from each segment. Additionally, images were evaluated for the physiological status (open or closed) of the triradiate- cartilage and proximal femoral epiphyses. 204 hips from 102 patients (32 females, 70 males) were retrospectively reviewed. There were 27 (26.5%) patients with cam-type morphology and 18 (17.6%) patients with pincer-type morphologies. No statistically significant difference was detected between the prevalences of cam and pincer morphologies between the two genders. Cam deformity was most frequently seen in anterosuperior segment. All of the patients (100%) with pincer-type morphology and 88% of the patients with cam-type morphology had closed triradiate cartilage, 89% of the patients with cam morphology and 83% with pincer morphology had open proximal femoral physis. Our results showed that prevalence of cam and pincer-type morphology in asymptomatic adolescents is similar to asymptomatic adults. Our findings also indicate that cam- and pincer-type FAI morphologies likely develop during late adolescence after closure of triradiate cartilage and before closure of proximal femoral physis. Level of Evidence - 3.
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March 2021

Vancomycin prophylaxis for revision hip arthroplasty in penicillin and cephalosporin sensitive patients: Is dose adjustment necessary in accordance with blood loss and fluid replacement?

Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc 2021 Jan;55(1):53-56

Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Hacettepe University, School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Objective: The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the changes in the serum concentration of prophylactically administrated vancomycin in the perioperative period of revision hip arthroplasty in penicillin/cephalosporin-allergic patients, (2) to assess whether the postoperative re-administration of vancomycin is needed, and (3) to determine the relationships of vancomycin serum concentration with blood loss, body weight, and fluid replacement in such patients.

Methods: This study consisted of 29 patients (20 females, 9 males; mean age=63.3 years; age range=45-79 years) with a history of penicillin/cephalosporin allergy undergoing revision hip arthroplasty secondary to aseptic loosening or periprosthetic fractures. Serum vancomycin levels were measured (1) before administration of vancomycin, (2) at the time of skin incision, (3) every 1,5 hours thereafter until the end of the operation, (4) during the skin closure, and (5) after three and 12 hours from the initial dosage. Data regarding body weight, amounts of intraoperative blood loss, fluid and blood replacements and postoperative wound drainage were recorded.

Results: The average blood loss, fluid replacement, and drain volume were 1280.3±575.8 (500-2700) mL, 2922.6±768.8 (1700-4600) mL, and 480.2±163.7 (200-850) mL, respectively. The mean levels of serum vancomycin were 46.3±21.8 (14.1-80.7) mg/L at the time of skin incision, 17.9±4.7 (9.4-30.9) and 9.8±2.2 (4.3-13.8) mg/L after 1.5 and 3 hours from the beginning of the surgery and 5.1±1.1 (2.9-6.8)mg/L after 12th hour postoperatively. The measured vancomycin levels were below the effective serum concentrations (< 5 mg/L) for 18 patients at 12 hours the administration of the first dose. A moderate level negative correlation between the blood loss/body weight ratio and vancomycin levels was found (p=0.004, r=-0.493). Predictive ROC curve analysis resulted in determining a blood loss volume higher than 1150 ml and a blood loss/body weight ratio higher than 18,5 is significant to estimate the vancomycin level below the minimum effective serum level at 12th hour postoperatively (AUC=0.793±0.16, p=0.009, AUC=0.753) 26±0.12, p=0.025, respectively).

Conclusion: Evidence from this study has indicated vancomycin concentration at 12th hour is below the effective level in most patients. Thus, earlier repetitive infusion of vancomycin seems to be necessary in penicillin/cephalosporin-allergic patients undergoing revision hip arthroplasty, especially in those with high blood loss.

Level Of Evidence: Level III, Therapeutic Study.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5152/j.aott.2021.20019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7932734PMC
January 2021

Sagittal spinal alignment after total hip arthroplasty for neglected high hip dysplasia: does changing the distorted mechanics of the hip normalize spinal alignment?

Spine Deform 2021 Jan 14;9(1):221-229. Epub 2020 Sep 14.

Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Hacettepe University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose: The false acetabulum lies more laterally and posteriorly compared with the true acetabulum. Spatial orientation of the pelvis is significantly altered in patients with neglected high hip dysplasia. There has been no study to investigate how pelvic or sagittal spinal alignment change after true acetabulum gains function with hip arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of total hip arthroplasty with femoral shortening on spinopelvic parameters in patients with neglected high hip dysplasia.

Methods: Twenty patients with Crowe type 3 or 4 hip dysplasia, who underwent total hip arthroplasty with femoral shortening in our institution were evaluated preoperatively after completion of rehabilitation and return to their normal daily life. Sagittal alignment (sacral slope, pelvic incidence, global tilt, segmental lordosis, segmental kyphosis, GAP score) and coronal alignment angles (coronal tilt, Cobb angle) of patients were measured by two independent observers.

Results: Twenty patients underwent hip arthroplasty with femoral shortening followed up for a minimum of 12 months. We found higher preoperative global lordosis (68.7 ± 9.7) and sacral slope (52.1 ± 8.8) angles, but the pelvic incidences (57.9 ± 10.1) were in the normal range. No statistically significant difference in any sagittal spinopelvic parameters between pre- and postoperative measurements was detected. GAP scores also did not change significantly (p = 0.231). Coronal plane parameters (Cobb angle, coronal pelvic tilt) were the only parameters in which a statistical change was observed (p = 0.02, p = 0.05, respectively).

Conclusion: Lumbar lordosis and sacral slope values are outside standard ranges in patients with neglected dysplasia of the hip. The reconstruction of the distorted mechanics of the hip joint does not normalize sagittal pelvic and spine anatomy however improvements in coronal alignment were observed. Disease specific values of sagittal spinal alignment should be used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative problems in patients with neglected high hip dysplasia.

Level Of Evidence: IV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s43390-020-00204-3DOI Listing
January 2021

Rotator cable and rotator interval: anatomy, biomechanics and clinical importance.

EFORT Open Rev 2019 Feb 20;4(2):56-62. Epub 2019 Feb 20.

Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Loyola University, Chicago, USA.

The rotator cable and rotator interval are among the most recent topics of interest in current shoulder literature. Most of the research has been published in the last two decades and our understanding about the importance of these anatomical structures has improved with biomechanical studies, which changed the pre- and intra-operative approaches of shoulder surgeons to rotator cuff tears in symptomatic patients.The rotator cable is a thick fibrous bundle that carries the applied forces to the rotator cuff like a 'suspension bridge'. Tears including this weight-bearing bridge result in more symptoms. On the other hand, the rotator interval is more like a protective cover consisting of multiple layers of ligaments and the capsule rather than a single anatomical formation like the rotator cable.Advances in our knowledge about the rotator interval demonstrate that even basic anatomical structures often have greater importance than we may have understood. Misdiagnosis of these two important structures may lead to persistent symptoms.Furthermore, some distinct rotator cuff tear patterns can be associated with concomitant rotator interval injuries because of the anatomical proximity of these two anatomical regions. We summarize these two important structures from the aspect of anatomy, biomechanics, radiology and clinical importance in a review of the literature. Cite this article: 2019;4:56-62. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.4.170071.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1302/2058-5241.4.170071DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6404790PMC
February 2019

Meniscal Transplants and Scaffolds: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

Knee Surg Relat Res 2017 Mar;29(1):3-10

Department of Orthopaedic and Traumatology, Hacettepe University, Ankara, Turkey.

The reported incidence of meniscal tears is approximately 61 per 100,000. In instances where preservation of the native meniscus is no longer a feasible option, meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) and implants or scaffolds may be considered. The goal of this review was to compare the success and failure rates of two techniques, MAT and meniscal scaffolds, and make an inference which treatment is more preferable at the present time and future. Studies that met inclusion criteria were assessed for technique used, type of transplant used, number of procedures included in the study, mean age of patients, mean follow-up time, number of failures, failure rate, and reported reoperation rate. Fifteen studies for the MAT group and 7 studies for the meniscal scaffold group were identified. In this selection of studies, the average failure rate in the MAT group was 18.7% and average reoperation rate was 31.3%. The average failure rate in the meniscal scaffold group was 5.6%, and average reoperation rate was 6.9%. It appears that although MAT is associated with high reoperation and failure rates, the limited number of studies on both MAT and scaffolds and mainly short-term results of scaffold studies make it difficult to make an objective comparison.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5792/ksrr.16.059DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5336368PMC
March 2017
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