Publications by authors named "Mehmet Erkilinc"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Proximal junctional kyphosis in pediatric spinal deformity surgery: a systematic review and critical analysis.

Spine Deform 2021 Oct 27. Epub 2021 Oct 27.

Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, 11100 Euclıd Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA.

Purpose: Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is a commonly encountered clinical and radiographic phenomenon after pediatric and adolescent spinal deformity surgery that may lead to post-operative deformity, pain, and dissatisfaction. Understanding the risk factors of PJK can be useful for pre-operative informed consent as well as to identify any potential preventative strategies.

Methods: We performed a systematic review and critical analysis following the PRISMA statement in July 2019 by searching the PubMed, Scopus, and Embase databases, including all prior published studies. We included articles with data on PJK in patients with operative pediatric and adolescent scoliosis and those that detailed risk factors and/or preventative strategies for PJK. Levels of evidence were determined based on consensus. Findings were summarized and grades of recommendation were assigned by consensus. This study was registered in the PROSPERO database; 202,457.

Results: Six hundred and thirty five studies were identified. Thirty-seven studies met criteria for inclusion into the analysis. No studies including neuromuscular scoliosis met inclusion criteria. No findings had Grade A evidence. There were 4 findings found to contribute to PJK with Grade B evidence in EOS: higher number of distractions, disruption of posterior elements, greater sagittal plane correction. There was no difference in incidence noted between etiology of the curvature. Five findings with Grade B evidence were found to contribute to PJK in AIS populations: higher pre-operative thoracic kyphosis, higher pre-operative lumbar lordosis, longer fusion constructs, greater sagittal plane correction, and posterior versus anterior fusion constructs.

Conclusion: Greater sagittal plane correction has Grade B evidence as a risk factor for PJK in both EOS and AIS populations. In EOS patients, an increased number of distractions and posterior element disruption are Grade B risk factors. In AIS patients, longer fusion constructs, higher pre-operative thoracic kyphosis and lumbar lordosis, and posterior (as opposed to anterior) constructs also contributed to PJK with Grade B evidence. These findings can guide informed consent and surgical management, and provide the foundation for future studies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s43390-021-00429-wDOI Listing
October 2021

Postoperative Correction in Idiopathic Scoliosis: Which Preoperative Imaging Technique Is Most Predictive?

J Pediatr Orthop 2021 Oct;41(9):e706-e711

Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, CaseWestern Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH.

Introduction: Preoperative radiographic assessment of curve flexibility in patients with idiopathic scoliosis is important to determine Lenke classification, operative levels, and potential postoperative correction. However, no consensus exists regarding the optimal technique. We compared measurements from supine side bending (SB) and intraoperative traction radiographs under general anesthesia (TUGA) with actual postoperative correction followed for 1 year.

Methods: We identified 235 patients with idiopathic scoliosis who underwent posterior spinal fusion with pedicle screw instrumentation between 2010 and 2018 who had preoperative and postoperative radiographs including standing posterior-anterior (PA) and lateral radiographs, preoperative SB radiographs, and TUGA radiographs. Curves were categorized into proximal thoracic, main thoracic/thoracolumbar (MT), and distal thoracolumbar/lumbar (TL/L) curves. Flexibility was calculated from SB and TUGA radiographs. Correction rates were calculated from 1 month and 1 year radiographs postoperatively. Bending radiographs that correlated significantly with postoperative correction with P<0.10 were eligible for inclusion. Preoperative demographics, etiology, deformity details, and surgical details were included in the multivariate models.

Results: On univariate analysis, TUGA radiographs correlated with postoperative correction at 1 month and 1 year on MT curves (r=0.214, P=0.001; r=0.209, P=0.001) and TL/L curves (r=0.280, P<0.001; r=0.181, P=0.006). Supine SB radiographs did not correlate with postoperative correction on either MT or T/TL curves. On multivariate analysis, major curve TUGA radiographs were independently associated with postoperative MT curve correction at 1 month (beta: 0.158, 95% confidence interval: 0.035-0.280, P=0.012) and 1 year (beta: 0.195, 95% confidence interval: 0.049-0.340, P=0.009). MT curve SB radiographs were not associated with postoperative major curve correction at 1 month (P=0.088).

Conclusions: TUGA radiographs independently correlated with postoperative main thoracic and distal thoracolumbar/lumbar curve correction at 1 month and 1 year postoperatively. SB radiographs independently correlated only with TL/L curve correction at 1 year postoperatively. However, this correlation was not as strong as TUGA correction (beta of 0.280 vs. beta of 0.092). TUGA radiographs appear superior to SB radiographs at predicting curve correction after surgery.

Level Of Evidence: Level III.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BPO.0000000000001846DOI Listing
October 2021

Getting Them Back in the Game: When Can Athletes With Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Safely Return to Sports? A Mixed-effects Study of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Association of North America.

J Pediatr Orthop 2021 Oct;41(9):e717-e721

Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH.

Background: Despite the relative frequency of posterior spinal fusion (PSF) and instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), there are limited guidelines for postoperative return to sports. Few studies explore factors influencing treating surgeons' recommendations.

Methods: A survey presenting several clinical vignettes of patients who had undergone PSF for AIS was distributed to 1496 Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) members. Of the 257 returned surveys, 170 met the inclusion criteria. Mixed-effects models were created to assess the effects of the surgeon and hypothetical patient characteristics on return to jogging, noncontact, contact, and collision sports.

Results: Estimated marginal mean time to return to sporting activities increased for more physically demanding sports [jogging: 4.1 mo, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.8-4.3; noncontact: 4.6 mo, 95% CI: 4.3-4.9; contact: 6.8 mo, 95% CI: 6.4-7.1; collision: 9.8 mo, 95% CI: 9.2-10.4]. Hypothetical patient characteristics (sex, age, obesity, skeletal maturity, levels fused, and fusions ending in thoracic versus lumbar spine) were not associated with changes in return to sport recommendations for jogging, noncontact, contact, or collision activities. Surgeon volume, experience, fellowship type, and practice setting all affected return to all activities (P<0.05). Surgeons with prior complications from return to sport delayed return to collision activities (9.4 mo, 95% CI: 8.4-10.3) versus surgeons without complications (7.2 mo, 95% CI: 5.7-8.7, P<0.001).

Conclusions: Surgeons currently allow earlier return to high-intensity sports after PSF for AIS compared with previous studies. Protocol trends vary based on physician-related factors such as years in practice, case volume, fellowship training, practice type, and prior experience with complications. Patient-related factors were not found to impact return to sport protocols. This survey provides a portrait of current practice trends and serves as a foundation for future investigation.

Level Of Evidence: Level V-survey study.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BPO.0000000000001902DOI Listing
October 2021

Is There Value in Venous Thromboembolism Chemoprophylaxis After Pediatric Scoliosis Surgery? A 28-Year Single Center Study.

J Pediatr Orthop 2021 Mar;41(3):138-142

Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center.

Background: With a recognized increase in the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children, especially in those with complex, chronic conditions, it is important for patient safety and risk management to identify subgroups that would benefit from prophylactic treatment. The aim of our study was to assess whether scoliosis surgery in children was associated with an increased incidence of VTE, including deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism, and if chemoprophylaxis is warranted.

Methods: We reviewed our institution's Pediatric Orthopaedic Spine Database (1992-2019) to identify patients who had a symptomatic VTE postoperatively.

Results: There were 1471 patients (1035 female, 436 male) with a mean age at surgery of 12.1±3.2 years (range, 1 to 18 y) underwent posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation (2131 procedures). No patients were given pharmacological VTE prophylaxis, and no routine screening for VTE was performed. Two patients had a lower extremity DVT (0.13%) within 6 months following surgery, (range, 55 to 161 d). Neither patient had a subsequent pulmonary embolism. They were 9 and 17 years of age with a diagnosis of neuromuscular scoliosis (1 each postpolio and myelodysplasia). One affected patient had a central venous line inserted perioperatively, a known risk factor for thromboembolism. All DVTs were treated with appropriately dosed anticoagulants. None had a family history of hypercoagulation.

Conclusions: The risk of symptomatic VTE is extraordinarily low after pediatric spinal deformity surgery. Mechanical prophylaxis is sufficient in most cases. Further multi-center studies may help identify patient specific risk factors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BPO.0000000000001746DOI Listing
March 2021

Current Concepts in Pediatric Septic Arthritis.

J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2021 Mar;29(5):196-206

From the Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Nemours Children's Hospital, Orlando, FL (Erkilinc), the Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (Gilmore, Weber, and Mistovich), Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (Gilmore, Weber, and Mistovich).

Septic arthritis continues to present challenges regarding the clinical diagnosis, workup, and definitive management. Urgent management is essential, so treating surgeons must efficiently work through differential diagnoses, identify concomitant infections, and do a timely irrigation and débridement. The incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is increasing, typically resulting in a more rapid progression of symptoms with more severe clinical presentation. The diagnostic utility of MRI has resulted in improved detection of concomitant septic arthritis and osteomyelitis, although MRI must not substantially delay definitive management. Early diagnosis followed by urgent irrigation and débridement and antibiotic therapy are essential for satisfactory long-term outcomes. Antibiotics should not be administered until blood cultures and arthrocentesis fluid are obtained, except in rare cases of a septic or toxic patient. Once cultures are obtained, empiric antibiotic therapy should commence and provide coverage for the most likely pathogens, given the patient's age. Laboratory markers, especially C-reactive protein, should be followed until normalization and correlate with resolution of clinical symptoms. Definitive antibiotic selection should be shared with a pediatric infectious disease specialist, who can help guide the duration of treatment.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5435/JAAOS-D-20-00835DOI Listing
March 2021

Bicolumnar 90-90 plating of AO 13C type fractures.

Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc 2017 03 22;51(2):128-132. Epub 2017 Mar 22.

Bakırkoy Dr. Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate functional results and complication rate of patients who underwent medial-dorsolateral plating for intra-articular distal humeral fracture (Müller AO type 13C).

Methods: Twenty-four patients (14 men, 10 women; mean age: 47 years) with AO type 13C distal humerus fracture were included in the study. Mean follow-up time was 28 months. Nine patients were in 13C1 subgroup, according to AO classification system, 11 patients were categorized as 13C2, and 4 patients were 13C3. Final follow-up assessment of outcomes included Broberg and Morrey radiological criteria; Mayo Elbow Performance Score, disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) Outcome Measure, score based on Jupiter criteria; and range of motion (ROM) values.

Results: The mean carrying angle of operated elbows was 11.37° (range: 0-20°). According to Broberg and Morrey radiological criteria, 14 patients, had radiologically normal elbow, 4 patients had mild change, 3 patients had moderate change, and 3 patients had severe radiological change. Mean DASH score was 21.91 (range: 0-50), and mean Mayo rating was 83.37 (range: 55-100). Jupiter criteria evaluation revealed excellent results in 10 cases, good in 12, and fair results in 2. One patient with fair result had open fracture, and the other had previous hemiparesis in the same extremity. There was no instance of nonunion observed at follow-up.

Conclusion: Osteosynthesis with medial-dorsolateral plating is a safe and effective method for the treatment of intra-articular fractures of distal humerus.

Level Of Evidence: Level IV, Therapeutic study.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aott.2016.09.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6197599PMC
March 2017
-->