Publications by authors named "Megan T Donahue"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Parallel process in psychodynamic supervision: The supervisor's perspective.

Psychotherapy (Chic) 2020 06 16;57(2):252-262. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Independent Practice.

Nine postdoctoral-level experienced psychodynamic supervisors were interviewed about working with a supervisee on a case involving parallel process (PP) that started in therapy and was enacted in supervision. Consensual qualitative research was used to analyze transcripts of the interviews. The general pattern that emerged from the analysis of the supervisors' reports was that clients behaved unusually in session, therapists "got hooked" by this change, therapists enacted the client's behavior in supervision, supervisors "got hooked," supervisors reflected on their reactions and intervened in a different way; reported outcomes were mostly positive (e.g., enhanced growth or understanding for the therapist). Results of this qualitative investigation provide evidence of PP and clues as to how experienced supervisors observe, describe, and respond to PP in ways that promote growth, insight, and understanding for their supervisees. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pst0000274DOI Listing
June 2020

Trauma symptoms for men and women in substance abuse treatment: a latent transition analysis.

J Subst Abuse Treat 2015 Mar 26;50:18-25. Epub 2014 Sep 26.

Department of Education, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA.

Differences in trauma symptoms among men and women in two court-involved substance abuse treatment programs were examined using latent transition analysis (LTA). It was hypothesized that women would be more likely to report clinical-level trauma symptoms than would men, but that both groups would show reductions in symptoms over time. Symptom classifications were determined by the LTA. Scores on the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) were obtained on 381 program participants, 112 men and 269 women, at intake and after 6 months in treatment. Three ordered classes were obtained for men and women at each time point: non-clinical (no TSI scales elevated), moderate symptoms (1 or 2 scales elevated) and severe symptoms (all scales elevated). Men were more likely to be represented in the non-clinical class at intake, while women had higher representation in the severe symptoms classification. There was a reduction of trauma symptoms for most men and women, but some groupings had symptoms that remained the same or became worse over time. Using gender and trauma-symptoms to help determine interventions is discussed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsat.2014.09.004DOI Listing
March 2015