Publications by authors named "Meena Makhecha"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Dermoscopy Differentiates Guttate Psoriasis from a Mimicker-Pityriasis Rosea.

Dermatol Pract Concept 2021 Jan 29;11(1):e2021138. Epub 2021 Jan 29.

Department of Pathology, HBT Medical College & Dr. R.N. Cooper Hospital, Mumbai, India.

Background: Guttate psoriasis (GP) and pityriasis rosea (PR) are a part of papulosquamous disorders that have very similar clinical features and often require histopathology to confirm the diagnosis. Dermoscopy has emerged as a noninvasive, cost-effective technique that can aid in the diagnosis of inflammatory skin diseases like GP and PR.

Objective: To study and compare the dermoscopic features of GP and PR.

Methods: Twenty consecutive patients each with GP or PR were enrolled in the study. The diagnosis of GP and PR were made clinically and on histopathology. Dermoscopic images were taken of the representative lesions from each patient using a manual dermoscope attached to a digital camera after applying ultrasound gel. Vascular morphology, vascular arrangement, background color, along with color and distribution of scales were noted in each case. Statistical analysis was done using chi-square test to determine the significance of findings in both groups.

Results: The combination of a bright red background with dotted vessels in uniform diffuse distribution with diffuse white scales was highly specific for the diagnosis of GP. Lesions of PR showed a red background with dotted blood vessels in nonspecific distribution. Scales were either white in color or brown pigmented with patchy distribution. Brown pigmentation and brown dots were additional findings in cases of PR.

Conclusions: Combinations of dermoscopic patterns can aid in the diagnosis of GP and PR in the majority of the cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5826/dpc.1101a138DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7875666PMC
January 2021

Dermoscopic features of various stages of lichen planus.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2020 Mar-Apr;86(2):191-194

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Hinduhridaysamrat Balasaheb Thackeray Medical College and Dr. RN Cooper Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_931_18DOI Listing
December 2020

A Case of Warty Dyskeratoma on an Unusual Location.

Indian Dermatol Online J 2019 May-Jun;10(3):343-345

Department of Dermatology, HBT Medical College and Dr. RN Cooper Hospital, Juhu, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_473_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6536085PMC
June 2019

Cutaneous Pseudolymphoma Secondary to Facial Thread Lift Procedure.

Indian Dermatol Online J 2019 May-Jun;10(3):322-324

Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Hinduhridaysamrat Balasaheb Thackeray Medical College, Dr. RN Cooper Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

Pseudolymphoma, refers to a heterogeneous group of benign reactive T-cell or B-cell lymphoproliferative processes of diverse causes that simulate cutaneous lymphomas clinically and/or histologically. Thread lift involves the elevation of sagging tissues for rejuvenating the face, which loses its elasticity and volume as one ages, by stimulating the production of new collagen and elastin. The incidence of complications with thread lift is comparatively low, like small ecchymosis, mild erythema, mild transitory hyperesthesia, and mild postoperative tumefaction. Cutaneous pseudolymphoma secondary to facial thread-lift procedure has not been previously reported as a complication. In this case report, we will be presenting cutaneous pseudolymphoma as one of the complications of thread-lift procedures and will be speculating its pathogenesis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_166_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6536059PMC
June 2019

Primary Systemic Amyloidosis Mimicking Rhinophyma.

Indian Dermatol Online J 2019 Mar-Apr;10(2):204-205

Department of Dermatology, HBT Medical College and Cooper Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/idoj.IDOJ_163_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6434763PMC
April 2019

Pitted keratolysis - a study of various clinical manifestations.

Int J Dermatol 2017 Nov 18;56(11):1154-1160. Epub 2017 Sep 18.

Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology, H.B.T. Medical College and Dr. R.N. Cooper Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

Background: Pitted keratolysis (PK) is a common bacterial infection of skin characterized by noninflammatory superficial pits. Very few studies have focused on variations in clinical manifestations of PK. We conducted this study so that diagnosis of this treatable condition is not missed when it presents in an uncommonly perceived way.

Aims And Objectives: Assessment of PK patients for various sites and morphologies.

Materials And Methods: A total of 30 patients with PK were assessed for various sites and morphologies. Bacterial and fungal cultures along with histopathology were performed.

Results: Of 30 patients, 24 were females. Hyperhidrosis and malodour were the most common symptoms. Interdigital interface skin of the toes was the first site affected in most patients. Plantar skin was affected in all patients with involvement of interface skin of the toes in 29 patients. Other sites affected were palms, finger web spaces, nonglabrous skin, paronychium, and nail. Other than classical pits, scaly crusted inflammatory lesions with post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH) were noted. Associated keratoderma was also reported in some patients.

Discussion: The presence of hyperhidrosis, malodour, and plantar lesions is consistent with previous studies. Interface skin between toes as the first site affected, involvement of toe web spaces, and associated keratoderma have been reported rarely. However, female preponderance, involvement of finger web spaces, nonglabrous skin, paronychium, nail changes, the presence of inflammation with crusting, and PIH have never been reported previously.

Conclusion: PK can involve web spaces, nonglabrous skin, and paronychium, and can cause nail changes. The lesions can be inflammatory with crusting and PIH.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ijd.13744DOI Listing
November 2017

Juvenile Hyaline Fibromatosis- A Rare Autosomal Recessive Disease.

J Clin Diagn Res 2017 Jul 1;11(7):SD04-SD06. Epub 2017 Jul 1.

Professor, Department of Pathology, Dr R N Cooper Hospital and Hindu Hriday Samrat Balasaheb Thackrey Medical College, Vile Parle West, Mumbai, India.

Systemic hyalinosis is inherited as an autosomal recessive disease. It may also be referred to as Fibromatosis hyalinica multiplex juvenilis and Murray-Puretic-Drescher syndrome. A four and a half-year-old female child presented with multiple soft tissue swellings involving the nose, orbital ridges, ears, bony prominences of the ulna and tibia and the parietal and occipital prominence and had gum hypertrophy. The diagnosis of this rare condition was based upon clinicopathological correlation, wherein the histopathological examination of cutaneous lesions reveals accumulation of hyaline material with fibroblast in the dermis. A multidisciplinary approach helped in correct diagnosis, management and in providing counseling for the parents. The child's parents were counseled about the surgical excision of the lesion; however, the parents opted for non-surgical conservative management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2017/25280.10293DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5583882PMC
July 2017

Pustular Psoriasis of Pregnancy with Acrodermatitis Continua of Hallopeau.

Indian J Dermatol 2016 Jan-Feb;61(1):123

Department of Dermatology, Dr. R.N. Cooper Municipal Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. E-mail:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0019-5154.174149DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4763659PMC
March 2016