Dr. Md Tofazzal Islam, Ph D - Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University - Professor

Dr. Md Tofazzal Islam

Ph D

Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University

Professor

Gazipur, Dhaka | Bangladesh

Main Specialties: Biotechnology, Molecular Genetic Pathology

Additional Specialties: Biotechnology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-7613-0261


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Dr. Md Tofazzal Islam, Ph D - Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University - Professor

Dr. Md Tofazzal Islam

Ph D

Introduction

Dr. Md. Tofazzal Islam is a Professor of the Department of Biotechnology of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU), Bangladesh. He did his Ph D in Applied Biosciences at Hokkaido University in Japan. Dr. Islam received postdoctoral research experiences at Hokkaido University (Japan), University of Goettingen (Germany), University of Nottingham (UK), and West Virginia University USA) under the fellowships of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, Commonwealth Scholarship Commission, and Fulbright Visiting Scholar Program, respectively. Prof. Islam is an internationally reputed scientist in molecular plant-microbe interactions and biotechnology. He published articles in many international journals and book series (>200 peer-reviewed articles, total citation 1,888, h index 24, i10-index 53; RG score 39.66). He established state-of-the-art research facilities at BSMRAU by external funding from World Bank, USDA, Bangladesh Academy of Science, British Council, Krishi Gobeshona Foundation and Government of Bangladesh. Currently, he is dedicated to establishing the Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering (IBGE) by upgrading Department of Biotechnology at BSMRAU.

Dr. Islam engaged and led 31 researchers from 14 institutes of 4 continents and successfully determined the genetic identity of the newly introduced fearsome wheat blast fungus in Bangladesh in 2016 within weeks by applying field pathogenomics and open data sharing approaches (https://bit.ly/2eXm9P2). He is now working with his British collaborators, Prof. Nicolas Talbot, and Prof. Sophien Kamoun to develop novel blast resistant wheat by using CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing. Dr. Islam received many prizes and medals including Bangladesh Academy of Science Gold Medal (2011), University Grants Commission Bangladesh Awards (2004 and 2008), and Best Young Scientist Award 2003 from the JSBBA, Japan. Prof. Islam is the Chief Editor of a book series, Bacilli and Agrobiotechnology publish by Springer. His research interests include genomics, genome editing, nanotechnology, plant probiotics, and novel biologicals, and bioactive natural products. He advocates for the promotion of open data sharing and open science to rapidly address the emerging plant diseases.

Primary Affiliation: Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University - Gazipur, Dhaka , Bangladesh

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:


View Dr. Md Tofazzal Islam’s Resume / CV

Education

Sep 2017 - Jun 2018
West Virginia University
Fulbright Visiting Scholar
Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design
Jun 2015 - Aug 2015
Gifu Daigaku
Postdoc
Field Science Center of Gifu University
Mar 2013 - Jun 2013
University of Nottingham
Postdoctoral Fellow
School of Geography
Apr 2007 - Mar 2009
Georg August Universität Gottingen
Postdoctoral Research as Georg Forster Research Fellow
Crop Science
Apr 2003 - Mar 2005
Hokkaido Daigaku
JSPS Postdoctoral Research
Biosciences
Oct 1997 - Sep 2002
Hokkaido Daigaku
MS and Ph D
Bioscience
Jul 1988 - Jun 1989
Bangladesh Agricultural University
M. Sc. (Ag.) in Agricultural Chemistry
Agricultural Chemistry
Jul 1984 - Jun 1988
Bangladesh Agricultural University
B. Sc. Ag. (Hons.)
Faculty of Agriculture

Experience

Sep 1994 - Jun 2010
Bangladesh Open University
Lecturer-Professor
School of Agriculture and Rural Development
Jul 2010
Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University
Professor
Biotechnology

Publications

39Publications

392Reads

45Profile Views

79PubMed Central Citations

Cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory resorcinol and alkylbenzoquinone derivatives from the leaves of Ardisia sieboldii.

Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2019 Nov;74(11-12):303-311

PAK Research Center, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/znc-2019-0114DOI Listing
November 2019
3 Reads

Salinity stress accelerates nutrients, dietary fiber, minerals, phytochemicals and antioxidant activity in Amaranthus tricolor leaves.

PLoS One 2018 1;13(11):e0206388. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Laboratory of Field Science, The United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University, Yanagido, Gifu, Japan.

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0206388PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6211690PMC
April 2019
7 Reads
3.234 Impact Factor

Anti-Staphylococcal Calopins from Fruiting Bodies of Caloboletus radicans.

J Nat Prod 2018 02 30;81(2):400-404. Epub 2018 Jan 30.

Faculty of Biology and Chemistry, Institute for Organic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Bremen , NW2C, Leobener Straße 7, D-28359 Bremen, Germany.

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http://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jnatprod.7b00525
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jnatprod.7b00525DOI Listing
February 2018
29 Reads
3.800 Impact Factor

Inhibitory Effects of Macrotetrolides from spp. On Zoosporogenesis and Motility of Peronosporomycete Zoospores Are Likely Linked with Enhanced ATPase Activity in Mitochondria.

Front Microbiol 2016 18;7:1824. Epub 2016 Nov 18.

Department of Biotechnology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University Gazipur, Bangladesh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2016.01824DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5114239PMC
November 2016
32 Reads
2 Citations
3.941 Impact Factor

Gageopeptins A and B, new inhibitors of zoospore motility of the phytopathogen Phytophthora capsici from a marine-derived bacterium Bacillus sp. 109GGC020.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2015 Aug 30;25(16):3325-9. Epub 2015 May 30.

Marine Natural Products Chemistry Laboratory, Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Republic of Korea; Department of Marine Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, 217 Gajungro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, Republic of Korea. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2015.05.070DOI Listing
August 2015
20 Reads
1 Citation
2.420 Impact Factor

Banchromene and other secondary metabolites from the endophytic fungus Fusarium sp. obtained from Piper guinensis inhibit the motility of phytopathogenic Plasmopara viticola zoospores

Tetrahedron Letters

A new chromene, (S)-banchromene (1), together with seven known compounds, ergosterol, beauvericin (2), fusaproliferin (3), radicinin (4), poly(3-hydroxybutyric acid) (PHB, 5), N-methylpyrrolidone and an inseparable mixture of isochromene derivatives 6a, 6b, were isolated from a culture of Fusarium sp. strain CAMKT24b1, an endophytic fungus from the leaves and twigs of Piper guinensis (Piperaceae). The structures of these metabolites were elucidated on the basis of their spectroscopic data; the absolute configuration of 1 was determined by ab initio-calculation of the optical rotation. In tests with the zoospores of the grapevine downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara viticola, compounds 1-4 showed moderate to high levels of motility-impairing activity at concentrations as low as 2.5 μg/mL. Compound 2 was the most active, exhibiting both motility-halting and lytic activities. Furthermore, compounds 2 and 3 displayed significant cytotoxic activity against brine shrimp larvae (Artemia salina) at 10 µg/mL. This is the first report on motility inhibitory and lytic activities of metabolites from an endophytic Fusarium species against the zoospores of the downy mildew pathogen P. viticola.

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July 2014
14 Reads

Non-cytotoxic antifungal agents: isolation and structures of gageopeptides A-D from a Bacillus strain 109GGC020.

J Agric Food Chem 2014 Jun 9;62(24):5565-72. Epub 2014 Jun 9.

Department of Marine Biotechnology, Korea University of Science and Technology , Daejeon 350-360, Republic of Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf502436rDOI Listing
June 2014
23 Reads
4 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

Gageotetrins A-C, noncytotoxic antimicrobial linear lipopeptides from a marine bacterium Bacillus subtilis.

Org Lett 2014 Feb 23;16(3):928-31. Epub 2014 Jan 23.

Department of Marine Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology , Republic of Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ol403657rDOI Listing
February 2014
42 Reads
7 Citations

Diversity of secondary metabolites from marine Bacillus species: chemistry and biological activity.

Mar Drugs 2013 Aug 12;11(8):2846-72. Epub 2013 Aug 12.

School of Science and Technology, Bangladesh Open University, Board Bazar, Gazipur 1705, Bangladesh.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md11082846DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3766869PMC
August 2013
15 Reads
19 Citations
2.853 Impact Factor

Diversity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Bacillus Species: Chemistry and Biological Activity

Marine Drugs

Marine Bacillus species produce versatile secondary metabolites including lipopeptides, polypeptides, macrolactones, fatty acids, polyketides, and isocoumarins. These structurally diverse compounds exhibit a wide range of biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, and antialgal activities. Some marine Bacillus strains can detoxify heavy metals through reduction processes and have the ability to produce carotenoids. The present article reviews the chemistry and biological activities of secondary metabolites from marine isolates. Side by side, the potential for application of these novel natural products from marine Bacillus strains as drugs, pesticides, carotenoids, and tools for the bioremediation of heavy metal toxicity are also discussed.

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August 2013
11 Reads

Zoosporicidal metabolites from an endophytic fungus Cryptaspariapsis sp. of Zanthaxylum leprieurii.

Phytachemistry

Two polyketides, cryptosporiopsin A (1) and hydroxypropan-2′,3′-diol orsellinate (3), and a natural cyclic pentapeptide (4), together with two known compounds were isolated from the culture of Cryptosporiopsis sp., an endophytic fungus from leaves and branches of Zanthoxylum leprieurii (Rutaceae). The structures of these metabolites were elucidated on the basis of their spectroscopic and spectrometric data. Cryptosporiopsin A and the other metabolites exhibited motility inhibitory and lytic activities against zoospores of the grapevine downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara viticola at 10–25 μg/mL. In addition, the isolated compounds displayed potent inhibitory activity against mycelial growth of two other peronosporomycete phytopathogens, Pythium ultimum, Aphanomyces cochlioides and a basidiomycetous fungus Rhizoctonia solani. Weak cytotoxic activity on brine shrimp larvae was observed.

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November 2012
12 Reads

Plant probiotics in phosphorus nutrition in crop plants, with special reference to rice

Bacteria in Agrabialagy: Plant Prabiatics

Low level of soluble soil phosphorus (P) is a serious constraint in crop production in tropical and subtropical soils. Many plant-associated bacteria or plant probiotics can solubilize P from either organic- or inorganic-bound phosphates thereby facilitating plant growth. Understanding the bacterial contribution to plant P nutrition and opportunities for manipulating specific bacterial strain to enhance P availability in soil has, therefore, been of considerable interest over many decades. This interest is accentuated by rising costs of P fertilizer and because of low efficiency of P use by plants from soil and fertilizer sources. Bacteria from diverse taxonomic genera such as Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Klebsiella, Streptomyces, Burkholderia, Pantoea, Enterobacter, etc., can solubilize soil insoluble P and increase growth and yield of crops. The widely recognized mechanisms of phosphate solubilization mediated by these plant-associated bacteria are production of organic acids (such as gluconic, citric, and oxalic) and/or secretion of hydrolytic enzymes (such as phytases, phosphatase, etc.). Despite their potential as low-input practical agents for plant P nutrition, application of phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) has been hampered by their inconsistent performance in the field. Hence, the full potentials of PSB have not yet been achieved for P nutrition in major crop production. Therefore, better understanding on how they interact with roots and other organisms in the rhizosphere is needed. This chapter reviews advances on PSB research and their potential for phosphorus nutrition in crop plants, with special reference to rice. Mode of action of phosphate solubilization by bacteria and their uses as biofertilizer for eco-friendly low-input sustainable crop production are also discussed.

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July 2012
18 Reads

Screening for phosphate solubilizing bacteria inhabiting the rhizoplane of rice grown in acidic soil in Bangladesh.

Acta Microbiol Immunol Hung 2012 Jun;59(2):199-213

Department of Food Engineering and Tea Technology, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet, Bangladesh.

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http://www.akademiai.com/doi/abs/10.1556/AMicr.59.2012.2.5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1556/AMicr.59.2012.2.5DOI Listing
June 2012
10 Reads
1 Citation
0.780 Impact Factor

Khatmiamycin, a motility inhibitor and zoosporicide against the grapevine downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara viticola from Streptomyces sp. ANK313.

J Antibiot (Tokyo) 2011 Oct 3;64(10):655-659. Epub 2011 Aug 3.

Institute of Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry, Georg-August University Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ja.2011.68DOI Listing
October 2011
16 Reads
4 Citations
2.041 Impact Factor

Protein kinase C is likely to be involved in zoosporogenesis and maintenance of flagellar motility in the peronosporomycete zoospores.

Mol Plant Microbe Interact 2011 Aug;24(8):938-47

Department of Crop Science, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-12-10-0280DOI Listing
August 2011
12 Reads
2 Citations
3.944 Impact Factor

Salinity effect on mineral nutrient distribution along roots and shoots of rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes differing in salt tolerance

Archives of Agronomy and Soil Science

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of salinity on mineral nutrient distribution along roots and shoots of seven selected rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes, namely Pokkali, PVSB9, PVSB19, PNR381, PNR519, NS15 and Iratom24 differing in salt tolerance. The rice plants were grown in pots and subjected to varying levels of salinity stress (0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 dS m−1). Mineral nutrients distribution in shoots and roots was measured after harvesting the plants at 95 days after transplanting. The responses of salt stress on mineral nutrient uptake and distribution along plant organs significantly differed among the rice genotypes. The contents of Na+ and Cl− in the roots and shoots of resistant genotypes (PVSB9, PNR381 and Pokkali) were significantly lower than the susceptible rice genotype (NS15). The concentrations of Na+ and Na+/K+ in shoots of sensitive rice genotype (NS15) sharply increased with increasing salinity above 6 dS m−1 than those of tolerant genotypes. The highest concentration of K+ was obtained in shoots of resistant genotype PVSB9 and this K+ content decreased more slowly with increasing salinity than those of other genotypes.

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February 2011
14 Reads

2,4-Diacetylphloroglucinol suppresses zoosporogenesis and impairs motility of Peronosporomycete zoospores

M. Tofazzal Islam, Andreas Tiedemann, 2011, '2,4-Diacetylphloroglucinol suppresses zoosporogenesis and impairs motility of Peronosporomycete zoospores', World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, vol. 27, no. 9, pp. 2071-2079

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February 2011
13 Reads

Bioactive isocoumarins from a terrestrial Streptomyces sp. ANK302.

Nat Prod Commun 2011 Jan;6(1):45-8

Institute of Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry, University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 2, D-37077 Göttingen, Germany.

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January 2011
8 Reads
3 Citations

Growth inhibition and excessive branching in Aphanomyces cochlioides induced by 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol is linked to disruption of filamentous actin cytoskeleton in the hyphae.

World J Microbiol Biotechnol 2010 Jul 25;26(7):1163-70. Epub 2009 Dec 25.

Laboratory of Ecological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Kita-Ku, Sapporo, 060-8589, Japan,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11274-009-0284-zDOI Listing
July 2010
10 Reads
1 Citation
1.780 Impact Factor

Variation in chemotactic preferences of Aphanomyces cochlioides zoospores to flavonoids.

Authors:
M Tofazzal Islam

Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2009 Nov-Dec;64(11-12):847-52

Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/znc-2009-11-1215DOI Listing
April 2010
7 Reads

Secondary metabolites from nonhost plants affect the motility and viability of phytopathogenic Aphanomyces cochlioides zoospores.

Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2008 Mar-Apr;63(3-4):233-40

Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/znc-2008-3-413DOI Listing
August 2008
6 Reads
1 Citation

Dynamic rearrangement of F-actin organization triggered by host-specific plant signal is linked to morphogenesis of Aphanomyces cochlioides zoospores.

Cell Motil Cytoskeleton 2008 Jul;65(7):553-62

Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cm.20281DOI Listing
July 2008
9 Reads

Phenolic constituents of Celosia cristata L. susceptible to spinach root rot pathogen Aphanomyces cochlioides.

Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 2006 Oct 7;70(10):2567-70. Epub 2006 Oct 7.

Laboratory of Ecological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1271/bbb.60272DOI Listing
October 2006
12 Reads
2 Citations
1.063 Impact Factor

Suppression of damping-off disease in host plants by the rhizoplane bacterium Lysobacter sp. strain SB-K88 is linked to plant colonization and antibiosis against soilborne Peronosporomycetes.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2005 Jul;71(7):3786-96

Laboratory of Ecological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.71.7.3786-3796.2005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1169021PMC
July 2005
15 Reads
19 Citations
3.670 Impact Factor

Quantification of the particle method for chemotactic bioassay using Peronosporomycete zoospores.

Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2004 Nov-Dec;59(11-12):892-6

Laboratory of Ecological Chemistry, Division of Applied Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-85 89, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/znc-2004-11-1221DOI Listing
February 2005
11 Reads

Requirement of a relatively high threshold level of Mg(2+) for cell growth of a rhizoplane bacterium, Sphingomonas yanoikuyae EC-S001.

Appl Environ Microbiol 2004 Sep;70(9):5214-21

Division of Applied Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.70.9.5214-5221.2004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC520926PMC
September 2004
11 Reads
2 Citations
3.670 Impact Factor

Zoosporicidal activities of anacardic acids against Aphanomyces cochlioides.

Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2002 Sep-Oct;57(9-10):874-82

Division of Applied Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/znc-2002-9-1020DOI Listing
December 2002
8 Reads
6 Citations

Zoosporicidal activity of polyflavonoid tannin identified in Lannea coromandelica stem bark against phytopathogenic oomycete Aphanomyces cochlioides.

J Agric Food Chem 2002 Nov;50(23):6697-703

Laboratory of Ecological Chemistry, Division of Applied Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8589, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf020554gDOI Listing
November 2002
11 Reads
4 Citations
2.912 Impact Factor

Nicotinamide and structurally related compounds show halting activity against zoospores of the phytopathogenic fungus Aphanomyces cochlioides.

Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2002 Mar-Apr;57(3-4):323-31

Division of Applied Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

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http://www.degruyter.com/dg/viewarticle.fullcontentlink:pdfe
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/znc-2002-3-422DOI Listing
July 2002
7 Reads
1 Citation

Repellent activity of estrogenic compounds toward zoospores of the phytopathogenic fungus Aphanomyces cochlioides.

Authors:
M T Islam S Tahara

Z Naturforsch C J Biosci 2001 Mar-Apr;56(3-4):253-61

Division of Applied Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/znc-2001-3-414DOI Listing
August 2001
6 Reads

Top co-authors

Satoshi Tahara
Satoshi Tahara

Hokkaido University

7
Hartmut Laatsch
Hartmut Laatsch

Institute for Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry

4
Yasuyuki Hashidoko
Yasuyuki Hashidoko

Hokkaido University

4
Fakir Shahidullah Tareq
Fakir Shahidullah Tareq

University of Science and Technology

4
Hee Jae Shin
Hee Jae Shin

Korea Ocean Research & Development Institute

4
Jong Seok Lee
Jong Seok Lee

Seoul National University Bundang Hospital

3
Choudhury M Hasan
Choudhury M Hasan

University of Dhaka

3
Yeon-Ju Lee
Yeon-Ju Lee

Seoul National University

3
Andreas von Tiedemann
Andreas von Tiedemann

Georg-August University

3
Yukiharu Fukushi
Yukiharu Fukushi

Hokkaido University

3