Publications by authors named "Mckensey Johnson"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Sensing everyday activity: Parent perceptions and feasibility.

Infant Behav Dev 2021 Feb 16;62:101511. Epub 2021 Jan 16.

Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, United States.

Mobile and wearable sensors provide a unique opportunity to capture the daily activities and interactions that shape developmental trajectories, with potential to revolutionize the study of development (de Barbaro, 2019). However, developmental research employing sensors is still in its infancy, and parents' comfort using these devices is uncertain. This exploratory report assesses parent willingness to participate in sensor studies via a nationally representative survey (N = 210) and live recruitment of a low-income, minority population for an ongoing study (N = 359). The survey allowed us to assess how protocol design influences acceptability, including various options for devices and datastream resolution, conditions of data sharing, and feedback. By contrast, our recruitment data provided insight into parents' true willingness to participate in a sensor study, with a protocol including 72 h of continuous audio, motion, and physiological data. Our results indicate that parents are relatively conservative when considering participation in sensing studies. However, nearly 41 % of surveyed parents reported that they would be at least somewhat willing to participate in studies with audio or video recordings, 26 % were willing or extremely willing, and 14 % reported being extremely willing. These results roughly paralleled our recruitment results, where 58 % of parents indicated interest, 29 % of parents scheduled to participate, and 10 % ultimately participated. Additionally, 70 % of caregivers stated their reason for not participating in the study was due to barriers unrelated to sensing while about 25 % noted barriers due to either privacy concerns or the physical sensors themselves. Parents' willingness to collect sensitive datastreams increased if data stayed within the household for individual use only, are shared anonymously with researchers, or if parents receive feedback from devices. Overall, our findings suggest that given the correct circumstances, mobile sensors are a feasible and promising tool for characterizing children's daily interactions and their role in development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2020.101511DOI Listing
February 2021

Automated Detection of Infant Holding Using Wearable Sensing: Implications for Developmental Science And Intervention.

Proc ACM Interact Mob Wearable Ubiquitous Technol 2019 Jun;3(2)

The University of Texas at Austin.

Physical contact is critical for children's physical and emotional growth and well-being. Previous studies of physical contact are limited to relatively short periods of direct observation and self-report methods. These methods limit researchers' understanding of the natural variation in physical contact across families, and its specific impacts on child development. In this study we develop a mobile sensing platform that can provide objective, unobtrusive, and continuous measurements of physical contact in naturalistic home interactions. Using commercially available motion detectors, our model reaches an accuracy of 0.870 (std: 0.059) for a second-by-second binary classification of holding. In addition, we detail five assessment scenarios applicable to the development of activity recognition models for social science research, where required accuracy may vary as a function of the intended use. Finally, we propose a grand vision for leveraging mobile sensors to access high-density markers of multiple determinants of early parent-child interactions, with implications for basic science and intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3328935DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6657512PMC
June 2019

The impact of symptom severity on cognitive function in obsessive-compulsive disorder: A meta-analysis.

Clin Psychol Rev 2019 02 22;67:36-44. Epub 2018 Sep 22.

Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USA.

Research on cognitive functions in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is notoriously heterogeneous with no moderators identified that account for this variability. OCD severity is the primary potential moderator of interest given the longstanding trait versus state debate. Nevertheless, severity has been previously assessed exclusively as a moderator and was not directly and systematically investigated. To address this gap in the literature, the aim of this study was to conduct a systematic meta-analytic review of correlations between cognitive function and symptom severity in OCD samples. Thirty-eight studies were included, allowing for analysis of 132 effects and meta-regression analyses for potential moderators. Small effects were found for the association between cognitive function and symptom severity on major neuropsychological domains, and some subdomains exhibited medium effects for this association. However, several significant methodological and conceptual problems were identified, including the use of the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale that assesses severity in the past week and not at time of testing, a tendency to not report non-significant correlations, and problematic ecological validity of neuropsychological tests in OCD. In conclusion, we found a small-to-moderate degree of association between OCD symptom severity and cognitive function, but results should be interpreted cautiously given the limitations identified. We offer recommendations that will facilitate future research into this association and move the field beyond the largely stagnant debate about the state versus trait nature of cognitive functioning in OCD, and across disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2018.09.003DOI Listing
February 2019