Publications by authors named "Mayo Tanabe"

12 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Unified magnifying endoscopic classification for esophageal, gastric and colonic lesions: a feasibility pilot study.

Endosc Int Open 2021 Sep 16;9(9):E1306-E1314. Epub 2021 Aug 16.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Image-enhanced magnifying endoscopy allows optimization of the detection and diagnosis of lesions found in the gastrointestinal tract. Current organ-specific classifications are well-accepted by specialized endoscopists but may pose confusion for general gastroenterologists. To address this, our group proposed the Unified Magnifying Endoscopic Classification (UMEC) which can be applied either in esophagus, stomach, or colon. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance and clinical applicability of UMEC. A single-center, feasibility pilot study was conducted. Two endoscopists with experience in magnifying narrow band imaging (NBI), blinded to white-light and non-magnifying NBI findings as well as histopathological diagnosis, independently reviewed and diagnosed all images based on UMEC. In brief, UMEC is divided into three categories: non-neoplasia, intramucosal neoplasia, and deep submucosal invasive cancer. The diagnostic performance of UMEC was assessed while using the gold standard histopathology as a reference. A total of 303 gastrointestinal lesions (88 esophageal squamous lesions, 90 gastric lesions, 125 colonic lesions) were assessed. The overall accuracy for both endoscopists in the diagnosis of esophageal squamous cell cancer, gastric cancer, and colorectal cancer were 84.7 %, 89.5 %, and 83.2 %, respectively. The interobserver agreement for each organ, Kappa statistics of 0.51, 0.73, and 0.63, was good. UMEC appears to be a simple and practically acceptable classification, particularly to general gastroenterologists, due to its good diagnostic accuracy, and deserves further evaluation in future studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1499-6638DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8367430PMC
September 2021

Diagnosis of congenital esophageal stenosis in adults and treatment with peroral endoscopic myotomy.

Ann Gastroenterol 2021 Jul-Aug;34(4):493-500. Epub 2021 Mar 23.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan (Haruo Ikeda, Haruhiro Inoue, Mary Raina Angeli Abad, Yusuke Fujiyoshi, Yohei Nishikawa, Akiko Toshimori, Mayo Tanabe, Yuto Shimamura, Kazuya Sumi, Yugo Iwaya, Manabu Onimaru).

Background: Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) in adults is a rare disorder that can present as achalasia, particularly in the distal esophagus. We describe the salient features of CES in adults and identify the feasibility and short-term outcomes of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for CES.

Methods: In this retrospective, single-center case series, we included 6 patients with a "misdiagnosis" of achalasia established elsewhere, ultimately diagnosed with CES and referred to our institution for POEM. Symptom improvement (clinical success rate), defined as an Eckardt Symptom Score (ESS) of <3 at 2-month follow up was assessed.

Results: Six patients (median age: 40 [range: 18-58] years; 4 males) were included. A long-standing history of dysphagia, ring-shaped stenosis on endoscopic examination, "lopsided hourglass" sign on barium esophagogram, and high-resolution manometry findings indicated by a compartmentalized intrabolus pressure pattern with distinction between the stenotic area and the lower esophageal sphincter were the salient features identified. POEM could not be completed in the first 2 cases due to technical challenges. All subsequent 4 patients who underwent successful POEM, exhibited improved ESS of ≤3 (clinical success rate 100%) at 2 months post-POEM.

Conclusions: Along with identification of salient features on several diagnostic modalities, a differential diagnosis of CES in adults must be considered in patients presenting with long-standing history of dysphagia arising from childhood and persisting into adulthood. Although favorable short-term outcomes of POEM were achieved, further evaluation is still warranted, and an inexperienced operator should not attempt POEM on CES patients due to its technical difficulties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.20524/aog.2021.0618DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8276369PMC
March 2021

Long-term clinical results of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for achalasia: First report of more than 10-year patient experience as assessed with a questionnaire-based survey.

Endosc Int Open 2021 Mar 19;9(3):E409-E416. Epub 2021 Feb 19.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Since per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was introduced in 2010, it has become accepted as one of the standard treatments for esophageal achalasia worldwide. This study aimed to present long-term clinical results of POEM over 10 years and evaluate the technique and outcomes at the institution where it was first used in clinical settings. Questionnaire-based surveys were sent to patients who received POEM in our institution from September 2008 to May 2010. Patient demographics and procedural outcomes and open-ended questions were posed about the postoperative courses, including symptom improvement and recurrence, additional treatments, and post-POEM gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms. Achalasia symptoms and post-POEM GERD symptoms were evaluated with Eckhardt scores and GerdQ systems, respectively.  Thirty-six consecutive POEMs were performed in that period and 10-year follow-up data were obtained from 15 patients (41.7 %). Although four cases (26.7 %) required additional pneumatic balloon dilatation (PBD), reduction in post-Eckardt scores were observed in 14 cases (93.3 %). GerdQ score was positive in one patient (6.7 %). Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) were taken by four patients (26.7 %) and their symptoms were well-controlled.  Clinical results of POEM over 10 years were favorable regardless of various factors. Symptoms improved even in patients who required additional treatments, suggesting that POEM plays a significant role in treatment of achalasia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1333-1883DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7895648PMC
March 2021

Simplified endoscopic pressure study integrated system for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Dig Endosc 2021 May 22;33(4):663-667. Epub 2021 Mar 22.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Endoscopic pressure study integrated system (EPSIS) is a novel tool for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. It enables the evaluation of the function of the lower esophageal sphincter by monitoring intragastric pressure (IGP) while insufflating the stomach during esophagogastroduodenoscopy. EPSIS can predict abnormal acid reflux with high accuracy based on previous studies. IGP was measured by inserting through the working channel of the scope an intragastric catheter connected to a pressure measuring device. Herein, we assess the feasibility of an updated EPSIS system, which can be performed just by connecting a flush tube to the working channel. This method does not require inserting foreign objects in the stomach and spares catheter insertion in order to simplify the procedure and reduce costs. A single-center pilot study was conducted to evaluate the association between catheter-based EPSIS and the updated EPSIS. The results of EPSIS in 20 patients who underwent both methods were assessed. In all cases, the waveform pattern of IGP measured by catheter-based EPSIS and updated EPSIS was consistent with 15 uphill pattern and five flat pattern. Intraobserver agreement of waveform pattern was perfect between two examiners with kappa value = 1. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for intraobserver reliability for maximum IGP was excellent with 0.91 (95% confidence interval [CI] of 0.77 < ICC < 0.96) and for pressure gradient was also good with 0.89 (95% CI of 0.71 < ICC < 0.95). In conclusion, our study suggests that the updated EPSIS can be performed without the use of a catheter.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/den.13947DOI Listing
May 2021

A novel endoscopic purse-string suture technique, "loop 9", for gastrointestinal defect closure: a pilot study.

Endoscopy 2021 Jan 20. Epub 2021 Jan 20.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

BACKGROUND : This study aimed to assess the feasibility and efficacy of the novel loop 9 method of gastrointestinal (GI) defect closure. METHODS : 20 patients underwent a GI procedure that required defect closure. Loop 9 can be delivered through a single instrument channel (3.2 mm) and released at the defect site. After it has been anchored by two clips positioned on opposite sides of the defect edge, the loop 9 is tightened by pulling the end of the suture intraluminally using biopsy forceps. Additional clips are placed to achieve complete closure. The primary outcome was complete closure rate. The secondary outcomes were closure time, sustained closure rate, and adverse events. RESULTS : Complete closure was achieved in 100 % of cases. The mean size of the mucosal defects was 17.5 mm (range 10-55 mm). The median closure time was 14 minutes. The sustained closure rate was 90 %. No adverse events were noted. CONCLUSIONS : The loop 9 technique is feasible and effective in achieving complete and sustained closure of therapeutic endoscopy-related GI defects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1364-4160DOI Listing
January 2021

Diagnostic yield of fourth-generation endocytoscopy for esophageal squamous lesions using a modified endocytoscopic classification.

Dig Endosc 2020 Dec 15. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

Digestive Disease Center, Showa University Koto, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: Endocytoscopy (EC) is an ultra-high magnification endoscopy designed to provide in vivo histologic assessment. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic yield of the newly developed fourth-generation EC for esophageal squamous lesions by using a modified EC classification.

Methods: A total of 2548 EC images of 57 esophageal targeted areas between June 2015 and October 2017 were retrospectively collected. Two lesions with low-quality images were excluded. Only EC images were independently reviewed by two expert and two non-expert endoscopists. The lesions were classified according to a three-tier modified EC classification. We used a multilevel logistic regression to analyze the data.

Results: The sensitivity and specificity of diagnosing non-squamous cell cancer (SCC) vs SCC were 82.5% and 83.0% by the experts; 90.1% and 75.0% by non-experts. The interobserver agreement among the four raters was good (kappa statistic 0.59). The diagnostic accuracy of experts and non-experts was similar (P = 0.16 for specificity and P = 0.20 for sensitivity). The sensitivity and specificity of EC for non-neoplasia vs neoplasia were 88.7% and 74.6% by experts; 90.3 and 52.1% by non-experts. The interobserver agreement among the four raters was moderate (kappa statistic 0.44). The specificity of experts was higher compared to non-experts, although the difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.08 for specificity and P = 0.93 for sensitivity).

Conclusions: Fourth-generation EC offers acceptable diagnostic accuracy and reliability in both experts and non-experts, especially when diagnosing SCC lesions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/den.13914DOI Listing
December 2020

Characterization of intragastric pressure waveform in endoscopic pressure study integrated system: Novel diagnostic device for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Dig Endosc 2021 Jul 8;33(5):780-787. Epub 2020 Dec 8.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: Endoscopic pressure study integrated system (EPSIS) is a novel diagnostic tool for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). EPSIS has been developed to evaluate lower esophageal sphincter function by monitoring the intragastric pressure (IGP) while insufflating the stomach during gastroscopy. Based on previous data, EPSIS could diagnose GERD with good accuracy by assessing IGP waveform pattern. This study aimed to further characterize the waveform to improve the diagnostic yield of EPSIS.

Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with typical GERD symptoms who underwent both EPSIS and 24-h impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH) at a single tertiary referral center from October 2018 to May 2020. EPSIS was performed by using a through-the-scope catheter connected to the pressure measuring system (TR-W550, TR-TeH08, AP-C35; Keyence, Osaka, Japan) to monitor IGP. Abnormal acid reflux was defined as acid exposure time (AET) over 6.0%. Pressure waveform was characterized as follows: (i) Basal IGP, (ii) Maximum IGP, (iii) Pressure difference, (iv) Gradient of the waveform.

Results: A total of 57 patients with GERD symptoms were analyzed. Twenty-one patients presented abnormal AET on MII-pH. Among EPSIS parameters, pressure difference during insufflation correlated with AET (ρ = -0.66, P < 0.01) and showed the best diagnostic accuracy for AET with the cutoff value of 4.7 mmHg (area under the curve [AUC], 0.87). The gradient of EPSIS waveform also revealed good diagnostic accuracy for abnormal AET with the cutoff value of 0.07 mmHg/s (AUC, 0.81).

Conclusions: Endoscopic pressure study integrated system waveform parameters, especially pressure difference, presented high diagnostic accuracy for the presence of abnormal acid reflux.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/den.13867DOI Listing
July 2021

Importance of second-look endoscopy after per-oral endoscopic myotomy for safe postoperative management.

Dig Endosc 2021 Mar 2;33(3):364-372. Epub 2020 Sep 2.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is a safe and effective treatment for achalasia and esophageal motility disorders. The role of second-look endoscopy (SE) on postoperative day 1 has not been examined. This study aimed to evaluate the findings and need of SE after POEM.

Methods: This is a single-center, retrospective study. All consecutive patients who underwent POEM and SE on postoperative day 1 between December 2017 and September 2019 were included. The primary endpoint was the rate of newly-detected adverse events (nAE) during SE that required endoscopic intervention or deviation from the normal postoperative course. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of nAE.

Results: Four-hundred-ninety-seven patients (mean age, 50.3 years; female, 49.9%) were included. SE identified abnormal findings in a total of 71 patients (14.3%). nAE which required endoscopic intervention or deviation from the normal postoperative course were identified in 12 patients (2.4%): eight (1.6%) entry site dehiscence; two (0.4%) submucosal hemorrhage or hematoma; and two (0.4%) dehiscence of an intraoperative perforation site after endoclip closure. Other findings such as mucosal thermal damage without perforation and small submucosal hematoma were found in 54 patients (10.9%) and five patients (1.0%), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that longer operation time and intraoperative adverse events (AE) were associated with clinically significant nAE during SE.

Conclusions: Second-look endoscopy can detect and treat nAE that may lead to severe AE. Thus, SE should be highly considered before starting oral ingestion in all cases, and especially in those who present an intraoperative AE and longer operation time.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/den.13770DOI Listing
March 2021

Endoscopic pressure study integrated system reflects gastroesophageal junction competence in patients with erosive esophagitis and Barrett´s esophagus.

Dig Endosc 2020 Nov 29;32(7):1050-1056. Epub 2020 Mar 29.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Showa University, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: The endoscopic pressure study integrated system (EPSIS) is a novel diagnostic tool for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) by monitoring intragastric pressure (IGP). Evaluation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function may be achieved endoscopically by utilizing this newly developed diagnostic tool. This study aimed to evaluate the association between EPSIS results and gastroesophageal reflux-related diseases, e.g., erosive esophagitis (EE) and Barrett's esophagus (BE).

Methods: This was a retrospective, single-center study. All patients who underwent EPSIS between November 2016 and July 2018 were included. EPSIS was performed during esophagogastroduodenoscopy with a dedicated electronic device and a through-the-scope catheter. The maximum IGP (IGP-max) and IGP waveform pattern (flat or uphill) were recorded with this system. Evaluation of an EE and BE was based on the Los Angeles classification and Prague classification, respectively.

Results: A total of 104 patients were enrolled; 29 (28%) had EE and 42 (40%) had BE. Patients with EE had lower IGP-max values (16.0 vs 18.8 mmHg, P = 0.01) and an EPSIS flat pattern was seen more frequently (82.8% vs 37.3%, P < 0.001). Similarly, patients with BE displayed a lower IGP-max (15.7 vs 19.6 mmHg, P < 0.001) and presented with an EPSIS flat pattern in a higher proportion (69% vs 37.1%, P < 0.001). These differences remained significant on multivariate analysis.

Conclusions: The EPSIS, as a novel diagnostic tool, was shown to exhibit a relation with EE and BE, implying that EPSIS is a promising modality to evaluate gastroesophageal reflux-related diseases and LES function endoscopically.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/den.13644DOI Listing
November 2020

Anti-reflux mucosal ablation (ARMA) as a new treatment for gastroesophageal reflux refractory to proton pump inhibitors: a pilot study.

Endosc Int Open 2020 Feb 22;8(2):E133-E138. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

 The incidence of proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been increasing. While surgical intervention with Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication remains the gold standard, less invasive anti-reflux interventions are desired. We have developed a minimally invasive anti-reflux mucosal ablation (ARMA) treatment. Herein, we report its technical details and describe its feasibility, safety, and efficacy in PPI-refractory GERD.  We conducted a prospective single-center single-arm interventional trial evaluating the outcome of ARMA in 12 patients with PPI-refractory GERD. GERD-Health Related Quality of Life Questionnaire (GERD-HRQL) evaluation, Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) assessment, and impedance-pH monitoring were performed at baseline and at 2 months post-ARMA.  A total of 12 patients underwent ARMA with a median follow-up duration of 9 months (range: 6 - 14 months). Median GERD-HRQL score significantly improved from 30.5 to 12 (  = 0.002); median FSSG score significantly improved from 25 to 10.5 (  = 0.002), and median DeMeester score decreased from 33.5 to 2.8 (  = 0.049) at 2 months follow-up. No immediate complications were observed.  Our pilot study has shown that ARMA, a new endoscopic treatment for PPI-refractory GERD, is simple, safe, and improves GERD-related symptoms and objective acid reflux parameters.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1031-9436DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6976329PMC
February 2020

Clinical outcomes of per-oral endoscopic tumor resection for submucosal tumors in the esophagus and gastric cardia.

Dig Endosc 2020 Mar 22;32(3):328-336. Epub 2019 Jul 22.

Digestive Diseases Center, Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: The clinical success of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) has led to the development of a new field of 'submucosal endoscopy'. This study aimed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and limitations of per-oral endoscopic tumor resection (POET) in the management of submucosal tumors (SMTs) in the esophagus and the gastric cardia.

Methods: POET was performed in 47 patients from January 2011 to December 2017. The indication for POET was SMTs ≤ 30 mm in minor axis diameter. Patient and tumor characteristics (age, gender, tumor location, size, and histology), operative and clinical results of POET (procedure time and completion rate, en bloc resection rate, length of hospitalization, adverse events and tumor recurrence) were analyzed retrospectively.

Results: POET was successfully completed in 43 patients (91.5%) without any major adverse events (Clavien-Dindo IIIb-IV). Four patients required conversion to an open surgical procedure due to suboptimal visualization during POET. Four patients underwent piecemeal resection of their SMTs including GISTs. Median follow-up was 44 months (10-96 months), during that time, there were no incidences of tumor recurrence. Tumors that had a minor axis diameter > 30 mm or a tumor mass index (TMI) [major axis diameter (mm) × minor axis diameter (mm)] >1000 had a high likelihood of being converted to surgical resection.

Conclusions: POET is a safe and effective treatment for SMTs. However, in patients where the minor axis diameter is > 30 mm or the TMI > 1000, surgical excision should be considered. Furthermore, application of POET for SMTs with malignant potential should be carefully considered to ensure optimal oncologic outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/den.13471DOI Listing
March 2020

Left pleural effusion caused by pancreaticopleural fistula with a pancreatic pseudocyst.

BMJ Case Rep 2016 Aug 24;2016. Epub 2016 Aug 24.

Showa University Koto Toyosu Hospital, Digestive Diseases Center, Tokyo, Japan.

Pancreaticopleural fistula is an uncommon complication of chronic pancreatitis. The authors described a case of a man with medical history of alcohol-related chronic pancreatitis, presented with dyspnoea. The roentgenogram showed a massive left pleural effusion. Additional work-up revealed a pancreaticopleural fistula and amylase-rich pleural effusion. His respiratory state improved after the insertion of chest drainage tube. During his admission, conservative and endoscopic therapy was required for the treatment of his complication of mediastinal abscess and arterial aneurysm in the pancreatic pseudocyst.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bcr-2016-217175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5015151PMC
August 2016
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