Publications by authors named "Mawar Subangkit"

11 Publications

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Suppurative necrotizing bronchopneumonia caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica infection in a stranded striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) in Japan.

J Vet Med Sci 2021 Jan 11;83(1):146-150. Epub 2020 Dec 11.

Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Nishi 1-1, Gakuen-Kibana, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.

On a coastline in Miyazaki Prefecture, Japan, a wild subadult female striped dolphin was found dead. Necropsy revealed poor nutritional status and bilateral pneumonia, which was histologically diagnosed as severe suppurative necrotizing bronchopneumonia. Special staining detected numerous intralesional filamentous, branching bacteria, which was identified as Nocardia cyriacigeorgica by sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA and gyrB genes. Other main histological findings included lymphoid depletion in the spleen and superficial cervical and pulmonary lymph nodes. Suppurative nocardiosis without a granulomatous reaction is uncommon, and it is assumed its pathogenesis was related to the host's immune status. This paper discusses the variable inflammatory response to nocardiosis and describes the first case of N. cyriacigeorgica infection in a wild striped dolphin in Japan.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1292/jvms.20-0234DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7870406PMC
January 2021

Co-infection of epithelial cells established from the upper and lower bovine respiratory tract with bovine respiratory syncytial virus and bacteria.

Vet Microbiol 2019 Aug 12;235:80-85. Epub 2019 Jun 12.

Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan. Electronic address:

Bovine respiratory disease complex is a major disease affecting the global cattle industry. Multiple infections by viruses and bacteria increase disease severity. Previously, we reported that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) infection increases adherence of Pasteurella multocida to human respiratory and bovine kidney epithelial cells. To examine the interaction between the virus and bacteria in bovine respiratory cells, we generated respiratory epithelial cell lines from bovine trachea (bTEC), bronchus (bBEC), and lung (bLEC). Although all established cell lines were infected by BRSV and P. multocida susceptibility differed according to site of origin. The cells derived from the lower respiratory tract (bBEC and bLEC) were significantly more susceptible to BRSV than those derived from the upper respiratory tract (bTEC). Pre-infection of bBEC and bLEC with BRSV increased adherence of P. multocida; this was not the case for bTEC. These results indicate that BRSV may reproduce better in the lower respiratory tract and encourage adherence of bacteria. Thus, we identify one possible mechanism underlying severe pneumonia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2019.06.010DOI Listing
August 2019

Genotyping of swine Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis isolates from Kyushu, Japan.

J Vet Med Sci 2019 Aug 3;81(8):1074-1079. Epub 2019 Jun 3.

Laboratory of Veterinary Microbiology, Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuenkibanadai Nishi, Miyazaki, Miyazaki 889-2192, Japan.

The incidence of diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing annually worldwide, including Japan. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hoiminissuis (MAH) is one of the most common NTM species responsible for chronic lung diseases in animals and humans. In the current study, mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) typing was employed to characterize the genetic diversity of swine MAH isolates from Kyushu, Japan. In total, 309 isolates were obtained from the lymph nodes of 107 pigs not displaying any clinical signs of disease, of which 307 were identified as MAH, comprising 173 strains. Based on eight established MIRU-VNTR loci, the MAH strains represented 50 genotypes constituting three lineages, and 29 had not been described in the Mac French National Institute for Agricultural Research Nouzilly MIRU-VNTR (Mac-INMV) database. MAH was the dominant M. avium complex (MAC) in pigs from Kyushu, and there was high genetic diversity among genotype profiles of MAH from Kyushu. We identified three predominant genotype profiles in the tested area sharing high relatedness with genotype profiles of strains isolated in European countries. MAH was the most common NTM in pigs from Kyushu and exhibited high diversity, with new strain-derived genotypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1292/jvms.19-0048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6715914PMC
August 2019

Isolation, Characterization and Proliferation of Cancer Cells from Breast Cancer Patients.

Acta Inform Med 2018 Dec;26(4):240-244

Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia.

Introduction: The most cases of cancer death, which are in the first rank among cancers suffered by women is breast cancer. The breast cancer therapy for patients has been done, but still not optimal, so it is necessary to understand the mechanism of therapy in model cell of breast cancer.

Aim: This study aim to develop an isolation technique of breast cancer cell from patients as a cancer cell model.

Material And Methods: Breast cancer cell isolation is performed by enzymatic methods using the collagen I and hyaluronidase. Then, breast cancer cells were characterized using flow cytometry based on the CD44/CD24 expression where MDA-MB468 and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines were used as positive controls. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), p53, HER2, and Ki67 expression were assessed using an immunohistochemistry assay.

Result And Discussion: The morphology of cancer cells was fibroblast like cells on the day 7 after isolation. Isolated breast cancer cells expressed 95.33±0.47% of CD44/CD24 and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) low expressions. Isolation of breast cancer cells can use In-house enzymatic protocol. Isolated breast cancer showed the same expression as MDA-MB468 (CD44/CD24) and HER2 compared to MCF-7 cell lines (CD44/CD24).

Conclusion: These cells belonged to a basal type of breast carcinoma and expressed CD44/CD24, then isolated BCCs can be used as model cancer cells for further research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5455/aim.2018.26.240-244DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6311122PMC
December 2018

Bovine respiratory syncytial virus infection enhances Pasteurella multocida adherence on respiratory epithelial cells.

Vet Microbiol 2018 Jul 30;220:33-38. Epub 2018 Apr 30.

Department of Veterinary Science, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan; Center for Animal Disease Control, University of Miyazaki, Miyazaki, Japan. Electronic address:

Primary infection with bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) predisposes cattle to secondary infection with bacteria that cause bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). However, the interaction between BRSV and bacteria is unclear. This in vitro study examined the adherence of Pasteurella multocida (PM) to BRSV-infected cells was assessed in colony forming unit assays, by flow cytometry analysis, and by indirect immunofluorescence analysis (IFA) of epithelial cells (A549, HEp-2, and MDBK). An in vitro model based on infection of BRSV-infected epithelial cells revealed that PM adherence to BRSV-infected cells was 2- to 8-fold higher than uninfected cells. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analysis and IFA. Epithelial cell expression of mRNA encoding cytokines and chemokines increased after exposure to PM, but increased further after co-infection with BRSV and PM. BRSV-mediated adherence of PM to epithelial cells may underlie the serious symptoms of BRDC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vetmic.2018.04.031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7117154PMC
July 2018

Detection of novel gammaherpesviruses from fruit bats in Indonesia.

J Med Microbiol 2018 Mar 5;67(3):415-422. Epub 2018 Feb 5.

Division of Molecular Pathobiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan.

Bats are an important natural reservoir of zoonotic viral pathogens. We previously isolated an alphaherpesvirus in fruit bats in Indonesia, and here establish the presence of viruses belonging to other taxa of the family Herpesviridae. We screened the same fruit bat population with pan-herpesvirus PCR and discovered 68 sequences of novel gammaherpesvirus, designated 'megabat gammaherpesvirus' (MgGHV). A phylogenetic analysis of approximately 3.4 kbp of continuous MgGHV sequences encompassing the glycoprotein B gene and DNA polymerase gene revealed that the MgGHV sequences are distinct from those of other reported gammaherpesviruses. Further analysis suggested the existence of co-infections of herpesviruses in Indonesian fruit bats. Our findings extend our understanding of the infectious cycles of herpesviruses in bats in Indonesia and the phylogenetic diversity of the gammaherpesviruses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1099/jmm.0.000689DOI Listing
March 2018

Divergent bufavirus harboured in megabats represents a new lineage of parvoviruses.

Sci Rep 2016 04 26;6:24257. Epub 2016 Apr 26.

Division of Molecular Pathobiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

Bufavirus is a recently recognized member of the genus Protoparvovirus in the subfamily Parvovirinae. It has been reported that human bufavirus was detected predominantly in patients with diarrhoea in several countries. However, little is known about bufavirus or its close relatives in nonhuman mammals. In this study, we performed nested-PCR screening and identified bufavirus from 12 megabats of Pteropus spp. in Indonesia. Furthermore, we determined nearly the full genome sequence of a novel megabat-borne bufavirus, tentatively named megabat bufavirus 1. Phylogenetic analyses showed that megabat bufavirus 1 clustered with known protoparvoviruses, including human bufavirus but represented a distinct lineage of bufavirus. Our analyses also inferred phylogenetic relationships among animal-borne bufaviruses recently reported by other studies. Recombination analyses suggested that the most common recent ancestor of megabat bufavirus 1 might have arisen from multiple genetic recombination events. These results characterized megabat bufavirus 1 as the first protoparvovirus discovered from megabats and indicates the high genetic divergence of bufavirus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep24257DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4845017PMC
April 2016

Detection of novel polyomaviruses in fruit bats in Indonesia.

Arch Virol 2015 Apr 12;160(4):1075-82. Epub 2015 Feb 12.

Division of Molecular Pathobiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, N20 W10, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 001-0020, Japan.

Bats are an important natural reservoir for a variety of viral pathogens, including polyomaviruses (PyVs). The aims of this study were: (i) to determine which PyVs are present in bats in Indonesia and (ii) to analyze the evolutionary relationships between bat PyVs and other known PyVs. Using broad-spectrum polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assays, we screened PyV DNA isolated from spleen samples from 82 wild fruit bats captured in Indonesia. Fragments of the PyV genome were detected in 10 of the 82 spleen samples screened, and eight full-length viral genome sequences were obtained using an inverse PCR method. A phylogenetic analysis of eight whole viral genome sequences showed that BatPyVs form two distinct genetic clusters within the proposed genus Orthopolyomavirus that are genetically different from previously described BatPyVs. Interestingly, one group of BatPyVs is genetically related to the primate PyVs, including human PyV9 and trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated PyV. This study has identified the presence of novel PyVs in fruit bats in Indonesia and provides genetic information about these BatPyVs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-015-2349-7DOI Listing
April 2015

Detection of coronavirus genomes in Moluccan naked-backed fruit bats in Indonesia.

Arch Virol 2015 Apr 4;160(4):1113-8. Epub 2015 Feb 4.

Division of Molecular Pathobiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, North 20 West 10, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 001-0020, Japan.

Bats have been shown to serve as natural reservoirs for numerous emerging viruses including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV). In the present study, we report the discovery of bat CoV genes in Indonesian Moluccan naked-backed fruit bats (Dobsonia moluccensis). A partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene sequence was detected in feces and tissues samples from the fruit bats, and the region between the RdRp and helicase genes could also be amplified from fecal samples. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that these bat CoVs are related to members of the genus Betacoronavirus.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00705-015-2342-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7086880PMC
April 2015

Isolation and characterization of a novel alphaherpesvirus in fruit bats.

J Virol 2014 Sep 18;88(17):9819-29. Epub 2014 Jun 18.

Division of Molecular Pathobiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Sapporo, Japan

Unlabelled: Bats are known to harbor emerging RNA viruses. Recent studies have used high-throughput sequencing technology to identify various virus species, including DNA viruses that are harbored by bats; however, little is known about the nature of these potentially novel viruses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel herpesvirus isolated from an Indonesian pteropodid bat. The virus, tentatively named fruit bat alphaherpesvirus 1 (FBAHV1), has a double-stranded DNA genome of 149,459 bp. The phylogenetic analyses suggested that FBAHV1 is phylogenetically grouped with simplexviruses within the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae. Inoculation of FBAHV1 into laboratory mice caused a lethal infection. Virus infection was observed in lung, liver, and brain tissue. Serological and PCR screening revealed that fruit bats infected with FBAHV1 or its related virus are widely distributed in Indonesia. The identification of FBAHV1 makes a considerable contribution to our understanding of simplexviruses associated with bats.

Importance: Bats are known to harbor emerging viruses, such as lyssaviruses, henipaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome-like coronaviruses, and filoviruses. Although alphaherpesviruses are disseminated in humans and other animals, there is little information about their distribution in bats. Here, we isolated a previously unknown alphaherpesvirus from an Indonesian fruit bat. Genome sequence analysis suggested that the virus is a member of the genus Simplexvirus within the subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, which also includes common human viruses, such as herpes simplex virus 1 and herpes simplex virus 2. FBAHV1 is the first bat-derived alphaherpesvirus whose complete genome has been sequenced.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01277-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4136302PMC
September 2014

Molecular detection of a novel paramyxovirus in fruit bats from Indonesia.

Virol J 2012 Oct 19;9:240. Epub 2012 Oct 19.

Division of Molecular Pathobiology, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.

Background: Fruit bats are known to harbor zoonotic paramyxoviruses including Nipah, Hendra, and Menangle viruses. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of paramyxovirus RNA in fruit bats from Indonesia.

Methods: RNA samples were obtained from the spleens of 110 fruit bats collected from four locations in Indonesia. All samples were screened by semi-nested broad spectrum reverse transcription PCR targeting the paramyxovirus polymerase (L) genes.

Results: Semi-nested reverse transcription PCR detected five previously unidentified paramyxoviruses from six fruit bats. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these virus sequences were related to henipavirus or rubulavirus.

Conclusions: This study indicates the presence of novel paramyxoviruses among fruit bat populations in Indonesia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1743-422X-9-240DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3499202PMC
October 2012