Publications by authors named "Maurike D de Groot-van der Mooren"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Older mothers and increased impact of prenatal screening: stable livebirth prevalence of trisomy 21 in the Netherlands for the period 2000-2013.

Eur J Hum Genet 2018 02 12;26(2):157-165. Epub 2018 Jan 12.

Department of Clinical Genetics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

In the Netherlands, there is no registry system regarding the livebirth prevalence of trisomy 21 (T21). In 2007, a national screening programme was introduced for all pregnant women, which may have changed the livebirth prevalence of T21. The aim of this study is to analyse trends in factors that influence livebirth prevalence of T21 and to estimate the livebirth prevalence of T21 for the period of 2000-2013. National data sets were used on the following: (1) livebirths according to maternal age and (2) prenatal testing and termination of pregnancy (ToP) following diagnosis of T21. These data are combined in a model that uses maternal age-specific risk on T21 and correction factors for natural foetal loss to assess livebirth prevalence of T21. The proportion of mothers aged ≥ 36 years has increased from 12.2% in 2000 to 16.6% in 2009, to gradually decrease afterwards to 15.2% in 2013. The number of invasive tests performed adjusted for total livebirths decreased (5.9% in 2000 vs. 3.2% in 2013) with 0.18% a year (95% CI: -0.21 to -0.15; p   < 0.001). Following invasive testing, a higher proportion of foetuses was diagnosed with T21 (1.6% in 2000 vs. 4.8% in 2013) with a significant increase of 0.22% a year (95% CI: 0.18-0.26; p < 0.001). The proportion of ToP subsequent to T21 diagnosis was on average 85.7%, with no clear time trend. This resulted in a stable T21 livebirth prevalence of 13.6 per 10,000 livebirths (regression coefficient -0.025 (95% CI: -0.126 to 0.77; p = 0.60).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41431-017-0075-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839038PMC
February 2018

Tracheal agenesis: approach towards this severe diagnosis. Case report and review of the literature.

Eur J Pediatr 2012 Mar 15;171(3):425-31. Epub 2011 Sep 15.

Department of Pediatrics, Subdivision of Neonatology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Tracheal agenesis (TA) is a severe congenital disorder with often an unexpected emergency presentation. There is complete or partial absence of the trachea below the larynx, with presence or absence of a tracheoesophageal fistula (TOF). A neonate with TA is described, and another 48 cases found in literature are reviewed. Due to absence of a TOF, five cases were diagnosed prenatally because of congenital high airway obstruction syndrome (CHAOS). When a TOF is present, polyhydramnion and several other congenital malformations seen on the ultrasound examination should alert clinicians of potential tracheal problems. Prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide a definitive diagnosis. Postnatal diagnosis is based on recognition of specific clinical signs in the newborn with TA: respiratory distress with breathing movement without appropriate air entry, no audible cry, and failed endotracheal intubation. Despite progress in surgical interventions, mortality remains high. Prenatal diagnosis of TA is possible, but only if a TOF is absent resulting in CHAOS. Prenatal diagnosis of polyhydramnion and other congenital malformation should alert clinicians of potential tracheal problems. Prenatal MRI may provide a definitive diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-011-1563-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3284653PMC
March 2012