Publications by authors named "Matthias Beudert"

5 Publications

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From Thermogelling Hydrogels toward Functional Bioinks: Controlled Modification and Cytocompatible Crosslinking.

Macromol Biosci 2021 Jul 22:e2100122. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Functional Polymer Materials, Chair for Advanced Materials Synthesis, Institute for Functional Materials and Biofabrication, Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy and Bavarian Polymer Institute, Julius-Maximilians-University Würzburg, Röntgenring 11, Würzburg, 97070, Germany.

Hydrogels are key components in bioink formulations to ensure printability and stability in biofabrication. In this study, a well-known Diels-Alder two-step post-polymerization modification approach is introduced into thermogelling diblock copolymers, comprising poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) and thermoresponsive poly(2-n-propyl-2-oxazine). The diblock copolymers are partially hydrolyzed and subsequently modified by acid/amine coupling with furan and maleimide moieties. While the thermogelling and shear-thinning properties allow excellent printability, trigger-less cell-friendly Diels-Alder click-chemistry yields long-term shape-fidelity. The introduced platform enables easy incorporation of cell-binding moieties (RGD-peptide) for cellular interaction. The hydrogel is functionalized with RGD-peptides using thiol-maleimide chemistry and cell proliferation as well as morphology of fibroblasts seeded on top of the hydrogels confirm the cell adhesion facilitated by the peptides. Finally, bioink formulations are tested for biocompatibility by incorporating fibroblasts homogenously inside the polymer solution pre-printing. After the printing and crosslinking process good cytocompatibility is confirmed. The established bioink system combines a two-step approach by physical precursor gelation followed by an additional chemical stabilization, offering a broad versatility for further biomechanical adaptation or bioresponsive peptide modification.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mabi.202100122DOI Listing
July 2021

Inverse Thermogelation of Aqueous Triblock Copolymer Solutions into Macroporous Shear-Thinning 3D Printable Inks.

ACS Appl Mater Interfaces 2020 Mar 6;12(11):12445-12456. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Functional Polymer Materials, Chair for Advanced Materials Synthesis, Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy and Bavarian Polymer Institute, Julius-Maximilians-University Würzburg, Röntgenring 11, 97070 Würzburg, Germany.

Amphiphilic block copolymers that undergo (reversible) physical gelation in aqueous media are of great interest in different areas including drug delivery, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and biofabrication. We investigated a small library of ABA-type triblock copolymers comprising poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) as the hydrophilic shell A and different aromatic poly(2-oxazoline)s and poly(2-oxazine)s cores B in an aqueous solution at different concentrations and temperatures. Interestingly, aqueous solutions of poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)--poly(2-phenyl-2-oxazine)--poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) (PMeOx--PPheOzi--PMeOx) undergo inverse thermogelation below a critical temperature by forming a reversible nanoscale wormlike network. The viscoelastic properties of the resulting gel can be conveniently tailored by the concentration and the polymer composition. Storage moduli of up to 110 kPa could be obtained while the material retains shear-thinning and rapid self-healing properties. We demonstrate three-dimensional (3D) printing of excellently defined and shape-persistent 24-layered scaffolds at different aqueous concentrations to highlight its application potential, e.g., in the research area of biofabrication. A macroporous microstructure, which is stable throughout the printing process, could be confirmed via cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. The absence of cytotoxicity even at very high concentrations opens a wide range of different applications for this first-in-class material in the field of biomaterials.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.9b21282DOI Listing
March 2020

Temperature-Dependent Rheological and Viscoelastic Investigation of a Poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-b-poly(2--butyl-2-oxazoline)-b-poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline)-Based Thermogelling Hydrogel.

J Funct Biomater 2019 Aug 7;10(3). Epub 2019 Aug 7.

Polymer Functional Materials, Chair for Advanced Materials Synthesis, Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy and Bavarian Polymer Institute, Julius-Maximilians-University Würzburg, 97084 Würzburg, Germany.

The synthesis and characterization of an ABA triblock copolymer based on hydrophilic poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) (pMeOx) blocks A and a modestly hydrophobic poly(2--butyl-2-oxazoline) (pBuOx) block B is described. Aqueous polymer solutions were prepared at different concentrations (1-20 wt %) and their thermogelling capability using visual observation was investigated at different temperatures ranging from 5 to 80 °C. As only a 20 wt % solution was found to undergo thermogelation, this concentration was investigated in more detail regarding its temperature-dependent viscoelastic profile utilizing various modes (strain or temperature sweep). The prepared hydrogels from this particular ABA triblock copolymer have interesting rheological and viscoelastic properties, such as reversible thermogelling and shear thinning, and may be used as bioink, which was supported by its very low cytotoxicity and initial printing experiments using the hydrogels. However, the soft character and low yield stress of the gels do not allow real 3D printing at this point.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jfb10030036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6787588PMC
August 2019

Regeneration After Radiation- and Immune-Mediated Tissue Injury Is Not Enhanced by Type III Interferon Signaling.

Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2019 03 29;103(4):970-976. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Klinik und Poliklinik für Innere Medizin 3, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.

Purpose: Type I interferon (IFN-I) and interleukin (IL)-22 modulate regeneration of the thymus and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) after cytotoxic stress such as irradiation. Radiation-induced damage to thymic tissues and IECs is a crucial aspect during the pathogenesis of inadequate immune reconstitution and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) with myeloablative total body irradiation (TBI), respectively. IL-22 and IFN-I reduce the severity of acute GVHD after allo-HSCT with myeloablative TBI. However, the role of biologically related type III interferon (IFN-III), also known as interferon lambda (IFN-λ) or IL-28, in this context is unclear. We therefore studied the role of the IFN-III pathway in thymic regeneration and GVHD after TBI and allo-HSCT.

Methods And Materials: Cohoused wild-type (WT) and IFN-III receptor-deficient (IL-28 receptor alpha subunit-deficient/IL-28Ra) mice were analyzed in models of TBI-induced thymus damage and a model of GVHD after allo-HSCT with myeloablative TBI. PASylated IFN-III (PASylated IL-28A, XL-protein GmbH) was generated to prolong the plasma half-life of IFN-III. Pharmacologic activity and the effects of PASylated IL-28A on radiation-induced thymus damage and the course of GVHD after allo-HSCT with myeloablative TBI were tested.

Results: The course and severity of GVHD after myeloablative TBI and allo-HSCT in IL-28Ra mice was comparable to those in WT mice. Activation of the IFN-III pathway by PASylated IL-28A did not significantly modulate GVHD after allo-HSCT with TBI. Furthermore, IL28Ra mice and WT mice showed similar thymus regeneration after radiation, which could also not be significantly modulated by IFN-III receptor engagement using PASylated IL-28A.

Conclusions: We analyzed the role of IFN-III signaling during radiation-mediated acute tissue injury. Despite molecular and biologic homologies with IFN-I and IL-22, IFN-III signaling did not improve thymus regeneration after radiation or the course of GVHD after myeloablative TBI and allo-HSCT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2018.11.038DOI Listing
March 2019

A widespread bacterial phenazine forms S-conjugates with biogenic thiols and crosslinks proteins.

Chem Sci 2016 Aug 14;7(8):4848-4855. Epub 2016 Apr 14.

Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology , Hans Knoell Institute , Beutenbergstrasse 11a , 07745 Jena , Germany . Email:

Phenazines are redox-active compounds produced by a range of bacteria, including many pathogens. Endowed with various biological activities, these ubiquitous N-heterocycles are well known for their ability to generate reactive oxygen species by redox cycling. Phenazines may lead to an irreversible depletion of glutathione, but a detailed mechanism has remained elusive. Furthermore, it is not understood why phenazines have so many protein targets and cause protein misfolding as well as their aggregation. Here we report the discovery of unprecedented conjugates (panphenazines A, B) of panthetheine and phenazine-1-carboxylic (PCA) acid from a sp., which prompted us to investigate their biogenesis. We found that PCA reacts with diverse biogenic thiols under radical-forming conditions, which provides a plausible model for irreversible glutathione depletion. To evaluate the scope of the reaction in cells we designed biotin and rhodamine conjugates for protein labelling and examined their covalent fusion with model proteins (ketosynthase, carbonic anhydrase III, albumin). Our results reveal important, yet overlooked biological roles of phenazines and show for the first time their function in protein conjugation and crosslinking.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/c6sc00503aDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6016718PMC
August 2016
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