Publications by authors named "Matthew Riolo"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The epichaperome is a mediator of toxic hippocampal stress and leads to protein connectivity-based dysfunction.

Nat Commun 2020 01 16;11(1):319. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Chemical Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA.

Optimal functioning of neuronal networks is critical to the complex cognitive processes of memory and executive function that deteriorate in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we use cellular and animal models as well as human biospecimens to show that AD-related stressors mediate global disturbances in dynamic intra- and inter-neuronal networks through pathologic rewiring of the chaperome system into epichaperomes. These structures provide the backbone upon which proteome-wide connectivity, and in turn, protein networks become disturbed and ultimately dysfunctional. We introduce the term protein connectivity-based dysfunction (PCBD) to define this mechanism. Among most sensitive to PCBD are pathways with key roles in synaptic plasticity. We show at cellular and target organ levels that network connectivity and functional imbalances revert to normal levels upon epichaperome inhibition. In conclusion, we provide proof-of-principle to propose AD is a PCBDopathy, a disease of proteome-wide connectivity defects mediated by maladaptive epichaperomes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-14082-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6965647PMC
January 2020

The epichaperome is an integrated chaperome network that facilitates tumour survival.

Nature 2016 Oct 5;538(7625):397-401. Epub 2016 Oct 5.

Program in Chemical Biology, Sloan Kettering Institute, New York, New York 10065, USA.

Transient, multi-protein complexes are important facilitators of cellular functions. This includes the chaperome, an abundant protein family comprising chaperones, co-chaperones, adaptors, and folding enzymes-dynamic complexes of which regulate cellular homeostasis together with the protein degradation machinery. Numerous studies have addressed the role of chaperome members in isolation, yet little is known about their relationships regarding how they interact and function together in malignancy. As function is probably highly dependent on endogenous conditions found in native tumours, chaperomes have resisted investigation, mainly due to the limitations of methods needed to disrupt or engineer the cellular environment to facilitate analysis. Such limitations have led to a bottleneck in our understanding of chaperome-related disease biology and in the development of chaperome-targeted cancer treatment. Here we examined the chaperome complexes in a large set of tumour specimens. The methods used maintained the endogenous native state of tumours and we exploited this to investigate the molecular characteristics and composition of the chaperome in cancer, the molecular factors that drive chaperome networks to crosstalk in tumours, the distinguishing factors of the chaperome in tumours sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition, and the characteristics of tumours that may benefit from chaperome therapy. We find that under conditions of stress, such as malignant transformation fuelled by MYC, the chaperome becomes biochemically 'rewired' to form a network of stable, survival-facilitating, high-molecular-weight complexes. The chaperones heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70) are nucleating sites for these physically and functionally integrated complexes. The results indicate that these tightly integrated chaperome units, here termed the epichaperome, can function as a network to enhance cellular survival, irrespective of tissue of origin or genetic background. The epichaperome, present in over half of all cancers tested, has implications for diagnostics and also provides potential vulnerability as a target for drug intervention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature19807DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5283383PMC
October 2016

Synthesis and evaluation of cell-permeable biotinylated PU-H71 derivatives as tumor Hsp90 probes.

Beilstein J Org Chem 2013 15;9:544-556. Epub 2013 Mar 15.

Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Sloan-Kettering Institute, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA.

The attachment of biotin to a small molecule provides a powerful tool in biology. Here, we present a systematic approach to identify biotinylated analogues of the Hsp90 inhibitor PU-H71 that are capable of permeating cell membranes so as to enable the investigation of Hsp90 complexes in live cells. The identified derivative 2g can isolate Hsp90 through affinity purification and, as we show, represents a unique and useful tool to probe tumor Hsp90 biology in live cells by affinity capture, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. To our knowledge, 2g is the only reported biotinylated Hsp90 probe to have such combined characteristics.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3762/bjoc.9.60DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3628991PMC
April 2013

Aging brain microenvironment decreases hippocampal neurogenesis through Wnt-mediated survivin signaling.

Aging Cell 2012 Jun 4;11(3):542-52. Epub 2012 Apr 4.

Center for Gene Therapy, Nationwide Children's Hospital Research Institute, Columbus, OH 43205, USA.

Accumulating evidence suggests that adult hippocampal neurogenesis relies on the controlled and continued proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs). With age, neurogenesis decreases through mechanisms that remain unclear but are believed to involve changes in the NPC microenvironment. Here, we provide evidence that NPC proliferation in the adult brain is in part regulated by astrocytes via Wnt signaling and that this cellular cross-talk is modified in the aging brain, leading to decreased proliferation of NPCs. Furthermore, we show that astrocytes regulate the NPC cell cycle by acting on the expression levels of survivin, a known mitotic regulator. Among cell cycle genes found down-regulated in aged NPCs, survivin was the only one that restored NPC proliferation in the aged brain. Our results provide a mechanism for the gradual loss of neurogenesis in the brain associated with aging and suggest that targeted modulation of survivin expression directly or through Wnt signaling could be used to stimulate adult neurogenesis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1474-9726.2012.00816.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3350615PMC
June 2012

Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) deacetylates survivin for its nuclear export in breast cancer.

J Biol Chem 2012 Mar 9;287(14):10885-93. Epub 2012 Feb 9.

Department of Pediatrics, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island 02903, USA.

Survivin is an oncogenic protein that is highly expressed in breast cancer and has a dual function that is dependent on its subcellular localization. In the cytosol, survivin blocks programmed cell death by inactivating caspase proteins; however, in the nucleus it facilitates cell division by regulating chromosomal movement and cytokinesis. In prior work, we showed that survivin is acetylated by CREB-binding protein (CBP), which restricts its localization to the nuclear compartment and thereby inhibits its anti-apoptotic function. Here, we identify histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) as responsible for abrogating CBP-mediated survivin acetylation in the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. HDAC6 directly binds survivin, an interaction that is enhanced by CBP. In quiescent breast cancer cells in culture and in malignant tissue sections from ER+ breast tumors, HDAC6 localizes to a perinuclear region of the cell, undergoing transport to the nucleus following CBP activation where it then deacetylates survivin. Genetically modified mouse embryonic fibroblasts that lack mhdac6 localize survivin predominantly to the nuclear compartment, whereas wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts localize survivin to distinct cytoplasmic structures. Together, these data imply that HDAC6 deacetylates survivin to regulate its nuclear export, a feature that may provide a novel target for patients with ER+ breast cancer.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M111.308791DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3322878PMC
March 2012

Acetylation directs survivin nuclear localization to repress STAT3 oncogenic activity.

J Biol Chem 2010 Nov 8;285(46):36129-37. Epub 2010 Sep 8.

Department of Pediatrics, Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island 02903, USA.

The multiple functions of the oncofetal protein survivin are dependent on its selective expression patterns within immunochemically distinct subcellular pools. The mechanism by which survivin localizes to these compartments, however, is only partly understood. Here we show that nuclear accumulation of survivin is promoted by CREB-binding protein (CBP)-dependent acetylation on lysine 129 (129K, Lys-129). We demonstrate a mechanism by which survivin acetylation at this position results in its homodimerization, while deacetylation promotes the formation of survivin monomers that heterodimerize with CRM1 and facilitate its nuclear export. Using proteomic analysis, we identified the oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 as a binding partner of nuclear survivin. We show that acetylated survivin binds to the N-terminal transcriptional activation domain of the STAT3 dimer and represses STAT3 transactivation of target gene promoters. Using multiplex PCR and DNA sequencing, we identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism (A → G) at Lys-129 that exists as a homozygous mutation in a neuroblastoma cell line and corresponds with a defect in survivin nuclear localization. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic equilibrium between survivin acetylation and deacetylation at amino acid 129 determines its interaction with CRM1, its subsequent subcellular localization, and its ability to inhibit STAT3 transactivation, providing a potential route for therapeutic intervention in STAT3-dependent tumors.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M110.152777DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2975235PMC
November 2010