Publications by authors named "Matthew Ferry"

22 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma.

J Am Osteopath Assoc 2020 Aug;120(8):543

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2020.089DOI Listing
August 2020

A Paleogenomic Reconstruction of the Deep Population History of the Andes.

Cell 2020 05 7;181(5):1131-1145.e21. Epub 2020 May 7.

Harvard Peabody Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.

There are many unanswered questions about the population history of the Central and South Central Andes, particularly regarding the impact of large-scale societies, such as the Moche, Wari, Tiwanaku, and Inca. We assembled genome-wide data on 89 individuals dating from ∼9,000-500 years ago (BP), with a particular focus on the period of the rise and fall of state societies. Today's genetic structure began to develop by 5,800 BP, followed by bi-directional gene flow between the North and South Highlands, and between the Highlands and Coast. We detect minimal admixture among neighboring groups between ∼2,000-500 BP, although we do detect cosmopolitanism (people of diverse ancestries living side-by-side) in the heartlands of the Tiwanaku and Inca polities. We also highlight cases of long-range mobility connecting the Andes to Argentina and the Northwest Andes to the Amazon Basin. VIDEO ABSTRACT.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2020.04.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7304944PMC
May 2020

Tinea InVersicolor: A Rare Distribution of a Common Eruption.

Cureus 2020 Jan 17;12(1):e6689. Epub 2020 Jan 17.

Dermatology, Affiliated Dermatology, Scottsdale, USA.

Tinea versicolor (TV), or pityriasis versicolor, is one of the most commonly occurring superficial mycoses. Typically, this condition is characterized by fine scaly hyper or hypopigmented macules and patches distributed on the trunk and upper extremities. Diagnosis is often based on clinical presentation. A Wood's lamp examination or potassium hydroxide (KOH) preparation test is performed for confirmation. To date, numerous morphologic variants of this condition have been described. Here we present an inverse papular variant that, to our knowledge, has only been previously reported once. This case represents another unique presentation of TV and serves to highlight the clinical variety of this common mycosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.6689DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7026868PMC
January 2020

The spread of steppe and Iranian-related ancestry in the islands of the western Mediterranean.

Nat Ecol Evol 2020 03 24;4(3):334-345. Epub 2020 Feb 24.

Instituto Internacional de Investigaciones Prehistóricas de Cantabria, Universidad de Cantabria-Gobierno de Cantabria-Banco Santander, Santander, Spain.

Steppe-pastoralist-related ancestry reached Central Europe by at least 2500 BC, whereas Iranian farmer-related ancestry was present in Aegean Europe by at least 1900 BC. However, the spread of these ancestries into the western Mediterranean, where they have contributed to many populations that live today, remains poorly understood. Here, we generated genome-wide ancient-DNA data from the Balearic Islands, Sicily and Sardinia, increasing the number of individuals with reported data from 5 to 66. The oldest individual from the Balearic Islands (~2400 BC) carried ancestry from steppe pastoralists that probably derived from west-to-east migration from Iberia, although two later Balearic individuals had less ancestry from steppe pastoralists. In Sicily, steppe pastoralist ancestry arrived by ~2200 BC, in part from Iberia; Iranian-related ancestry arrived by the mid-second millennium BC, contemporary to its previously documented spread to the Aegean; and there was large-scale population replacement after the Bronze Age. In Sardinia, nearly all ancestry derived from the island's early farmers until the first millennium BC, with the exception of an outlier from the third millennium BC, who had primarily North African ancestry and who-along with an approximately contemporary Iberian-documents widespread Africa-to-Europe gene flow in the Chalcolithic. Major immigration into Sardinia began in the first millennium BC and, at present, no more than 56-62% of Sardinian ancestry is from its first farmers. This value is lower than previous estimates, highlighting that Sardinia, similar to every other region in Europe, has been a stage for major movement and mixtures of people.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41559-020-1102-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7080320PMC
March 2020

An Ancient Harappan Genome Lacks Ancestry from Steppe Pastoralists or Iranian Farmers.

Cell 2019 10 5;179(3):729-735.e10. Epub 2019 Sep 5.

Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Electronic address:

We report an ancient genome from the Indus Valley Civilization (IVC). The individual we sequenced fits as a mixture of people related to ancient Iranians (the largest component) and Southeast Asian hunter-gatherers, a unique profile that matches ancient DNA from 11 genetic outliers from sites in Iran and Turkmenistan in cultural communication with the IVC. These individuals had little if any Steppe pastoralist-derived ancestry, showing that it was not ubiquitous in northwest South Asia during the IVC as it is today. The Iranian-related ancestry in the IVC derives from a lineage leading to early Iranian farmers, herders, and hunter-gatherers before their ancestors separated, contradicting the hypothesis that the shared ancestry between early Iranians and South Asians reflects a large-scale spread of western Iranian farmers east. Instead, sampled ancient genomes from the Iranian plateau and IVC descend from different groups of hunter-gatherers who began farming without being connected by substantial movement of people.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2019.08.048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6800651PMC
October 2019

The formation of human populations in South and Central Asia.

Science 2019 09;365(6457)

Earth Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.

By sequencing 523 ancient humans, we show that the primary source of ancestry in modern South Asians is a prehistoric genetic gradient between people related to early hunter-gatherers of Iran and Southeast Asia. After the Indus Valley Civilization's decline, its people mixed with individuals in the southeast to form one of the two main ancestral populations of South Asia, whose direct descendants live in southern India. Simultaneously, they mixed with descendants of Steppe pastoralists who, starting around 4000 years ago, spread via Central Asia to form the other main ancestral population. The Steppe ancestry in South Asia has the same profile as that in Bronze Age Eastern Europe, tracking a movement of people that affected both regions and that likely spread the distinctive features shared between Indo-Iranian and Balto-Slavic languages.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aat7487DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6822619PMC
September 2019

Ancient DNA from the skeletons of Roopkund Lake reveals Mediterranean migrants in India.

Nat Commun 2019 08 20;10(1):3670. Epub 2019 Aug 20.

CSIR Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500007, India.

Situated at over 5,000 meters above sea level in the Himalayan Mountains, Roopkund Lake is home to the scattered skeletal remains of several hundred individuals of unknown origin. We report genome-wide ancient DNA for 38 skeletons from Roopkund Lake, and find that they cluster into three distinct groups. A group of 23 individuals have ancestry that falls within the range of variation of present-day South Asians. A further 14 have ancestry typical of the eastern Mediterranean. We also identify one individual with Southeast Asian-related ancestry. Radiocarbon dating indicates that these remains were not deposited simultaneously. Instead, all of the individuals with South Asian-related ancestry date to ~800 CE (but with evidence of being deposited in more than one event), while all other individuals date to ~1800 CE. These differences are also reflected in stable isotope measurements, which reveal a distinct dietary profile for the two main groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-11357-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6702210PMC
August 2019

Author Correction: Ancient genomes indicate population replacement in Early Neolithic Britain.

Nat Ecol Evol 2019 Jun;3(6):986-987

Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, London, UK.

In the version of this Article originally published, there were errors in the colour ordering of the legend in Fig. 5b, and in the positions of the target and surrogate populations in Fig. 5c. This has now been corrected. The conclusions of the study are in no way affected. The errors have been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41559-019-0912-4DOI Listing
June 2019

Ancient genomes indicate population replacement in Early Neolithic Britain.

Nat Ecol Evol 2019 05 15;3(5):765-771. Epub 2019 Apr 15.

Department of Earth Sciences, Natural History Museum, London, UK.

The roles of migration, admixture and acculturation in the European transition to farming have been debated for over 100 years. Genome-wide ancient DNA studies indicate predominantly Aegean ancestry for continental Neolithic farmers, but also variable admixture with local Mesolithic hunter-gatherers. Neolithic cultures first appear in Britain circa 4000 BC, a millennium after they appeared in adjacent areas of continental Europe. The pattern and process of this delayed British Neolithic transition remain unclear. We assembled genome-wide data from 6 Mesolithic and 67 Neolithic individuals found in Britain, dating 8500-2500 BC. Our analyses reveal persistent genetic affinities between Mesolithic British and Western European hunter-gatherers. We find overwhelming support for agriculture being introduced to Britain by incoming continental farmers, with small, geographically structured levels of hunter-gatherer ancestry. Unlike other European Neolithic populations, we detect no resurgence of hunter-gatherer ancestry at any time during the Neolithic in Britain. Genetic affinities with Iberian Neolithic individuals indicate that British Neolithic people were mostly descended from Aegean farmers who followed the Mediterranean route of dispersal. We also infer considerable variation in pigmentation levels in Europe by circa 6000 BC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41559-019-0871-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6520225PMC
May 2019

Ancient human genome-wide data from a 3000-year interval in the Caucasus corresponds with eco-geographic regions.

Nat Commun 2019 02 4;10(1):590. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

German Archaeological Institute, Department of Natural Sciences, Im Dol 2-6, D-14195, Berlin, Germany.

Archaeogenetic studies have described the formation of Eurasian 'steppe ancestry' as a mixture of Eastern and Caucasus hunter-gatherers. However, it remains unclear when and where this ancestry arose and whether it was related to a horizon of cultural innovations in the 4 millennium BCE that subsequently facilitated the advance of pastoral societies in Eurasia. Here we generated genome-wide SNP data from 45 prehistoric individuals along a 3000-year temporal transect in the North Caucasus. We observe a genetic separation between the groups of the Caucasus and those of the adjacent steppe. The northern Caucasus groups are genetically similar to contemporaneous populations south of it, suggesting human movement across the mountain range during the Bronze Age. The steppe groups from Yamnaya and subsequent pastoralist cultures show evidence for previously undetected farmer-related ancestry from different contact zones, while Steppe Maykop individuals harbour additional Upper Palaeolithic Siberian and Native American related ancestry.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-08220-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6360191PMC
February 2019

Reconstructing the Deep Population History of Central and South America.

Cell 2018 11 8;175(5):1185-1197.e22. Epub 2018 Nov 8.

Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig 04103, Germany.

We report genome-wide ancient DNA from 49 individuals forming four parallel time transects in Belize, Brazil, the Central Andes, and the Southern Cone, each dating to at least ∼9,000 years ago. The common ancestral population radiated rapidly from just one of the two early branches that contributed to Native Americans today. We document two previously unappreciated streams of gene flow between North and South America. One affected the Central Andes by ∼4,200 years ago, while the other explains an affinity between the oldest North American genome associated with the Clovis culture and the oldest Central and South Americans from Chile, Brazil, and Belize. However, this was not the primary source for later South Americans, as the other ancient individuals derive from lineages without specific affinity to the Clovis-associated genome, suggesting a population replacement that began at least 9,000 years ago and was followed by substantial population continuity in multiple regions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2018.10.027DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6327247PMC
November 2018

Ancient genomes document multiple waves of migration in Southeast Asian prehistory.

Science 2018 07 17;361(6397):92-95. Epub 2018 May 17.

Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Southeast Asia is home to rich human genetic and linguistic diversity, but the details of past population movements in the region are not well known. Here, we report genome-wide ancient DNA data from 18 Southeast Asian individuals spanning from the Neolithic period through the Iron Age (4100 to 1700 years ago). Early farmers from Man Bac in Vietnam exhibit a mixture of East Asian (southern Chinese agriculturalist) and deeply diverged eastern Eurasian (hunter-gatherer) ancestry characteristic of Austroasiatic speakers, with similar ancestry as far south as Indonesia providing evidence for an expansive initial spread of Austroasiatic languages. By the Bronze Age, in a parallel pattern to Europe, sites in Vietnam and Myanmar show close connections to present-day majority groups, reflecting substantial additional influxes of migrants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aat3188DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6476732PMC
July 2018

Population Turnover in Remote Oceania Shortly after Initial Settlement.

Curr Biol 2018 04 28;28(7):1157-1165.e7. Epub 2018 Feb 28.

Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Medical and Population Genetics Program, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Max Planck-Harvard Research Center for the Archaeoscience of the Ancient Mediterranean, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. Electronic address:

Ancient DNA from Vanuatu and Tonga dating to about 2,900-2,600 years ago (before present, BP) has revealed that the "First Remote Oceanians" associated with the Lapita archaeological culture were directly descended from the population that, beginning around 5000 BP, spread Austronesian languages from Taiwan to the Philippines, western Melanesia, and eventually Remote Oceania. Thus, ancestors of the First Remote Oceanians must have passed by the Papuan-ancestry populations they encountered in New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago, and the Solomon Islands with minimal admixture [1]. However, all present-day populations in Near and Remote Oceania harbor >25% Papuan ancestry, implying that additional eastward migration must have occurred. We generated genome-wide data for 14 ancient individuals from Efate and Epi Islands in Vanuatu from 2900-150 BP, as well as 185 present-day individuals from 18 islands. We find that people of almost entirely Papuan ancestry arrived in Vanuatu by around 2300 BP, most likely reflecting migrations a few hundred years earlier at the end of the Lapita period, when there is also evidence of changes in skeletal morphology and cessation of long-distance trade between Near and Remote Oceania [2, 3]. Papuan ancestry was subsequently diluted through admixture but remains at least 80%-90% in most islands. Through a fine-grained analysis of ancestry profiles, we show that the Papuan ancestry in Vanuatu derives from the Bismarck Archipelago rather than the geographically closer Solomon Islands. However, the Papuan ancestry in Polynesia-the most remote Pacific islands-derives from different sources, documenting a third stream of migration from Near to Remote Oceania.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2018.02.051DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5882562PMC
April 2018

The Beaker phenomenon and the genomic transformation of northwest Europe.

Nature 2018 03 21;555(7695):190-196. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Departamento de Prehistoria y Arqueología, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049, Spain.

From around 2750 to 2500 bc, Bell Beaker pottery became widespread across western and central Europe, before it disappeared between 2200 and 1800 bc. The forces that propelled its expansion are a matter of long-standing debate, and there is support for both cultural diffusion and migration having a role in this process. Here we present genome-wide data from 400 Neolithic, Copper Age and Bronze Age Europeans, including 226 individuals associated with Beaker-complex artefacts. We detected limited genetic affinity between Beaker-complex-associated individuals from Iberia and central Europe, and thus exclude migration as an important mechanism of spread between these two regions. However, migration had a key role in the further dissemination of the Beaker complex. We document this phenomenon most clearly in Britain, where the spread of the Beaker complex introduced high levels of steppe-related ancestry and was associated with the replacement of approximately 90% of Britain's gene pool within a few hundred years, continuing the east-to-west expansion that had brought steppe-related ancestry into central and northern Europe over the previous centuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature25738DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973796PMC
March 2018

The genomic history of southeastern Europe.

Nature 2018 03 21;555(7695):197-203. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Firenze, 50122 Florence, Italy.

Farming was first introduced to Europe in the mid-seventh millennium bc, and was associated with migrants from Anatolia who settled in the southeast before spreading throughout Europe. Here, to understand the dynamics of this process, we analysed genome-wide ancient DNA data from 225 individuals who lived in southeastern Europe and surrounding regions between 12000 and 500 bc. We document a west-east cline of ancestry in indigenous hunter-gatherers and, in eastern Europe, the early stages in the formation of Bronze Age steppe ancestry. We show that the first farmers of northern and western Europe dispersed through southeastern Europe with limited hunter-gatherer admixture, but that some early groups in the southeast mixed extensively with hunter-gatherers without the sex-biased admixture that prevailed later in the north and west. We also show that southeastern Europe continued to be a nexus between east and west after the arrival of farmers, with intermittent genetic contact with steppe populations occurring up to 2,000 years earlier than the migrations from the steppe that ultimately replaced much of the population of northern Europe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature25778DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6091220PMC
March 2018

Parallel palaeogenomic transects reveal complex genetic history of early European farmers.

Nature 2017 11 8;551(7680):368-372. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

Laczkó Dezso˝ Museum, Veszprém 8200, Hungary.

Ancient DNA studies have established that Neolithic European populations were descended from Anatolian migrants who received a limited amount of admixture from resident hunter-gatherers. Many open questions remain, however, about the spatial and temporal dynamics of population interactions and admixture during the Neolithic period. Here we investigate the population dynamics of Neolithization across Europe using a high-resolution genome-wide ancient DNA dataset with a total of 180 samples, of which 130 are newly reported here, from the Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods of Hungary (6000-2900 bc, n = 100), Germany (5500-3000 bc, n = 42) and Spain (5500-2200 bc, n = 38). We find that genetic diversity was shaped predominantly by local processes, with varied sources and proportions of hunter-gatherer ancestry among the three regions and through time. Admixture between groups with different ancestry profiles was pervasive and resulted in observable population transformation across almost all cultural transitions. Our results shed new light on the ways in which gene flow reshaped European populations throughout the Neolithic period and demonstrate the potential of time-series-based sampling and modelling approaches to elucidate multiple dimensions of historical population interactions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature24476DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973800PMC
November 2017

Reconstructing Prehistoric African Population Structure.

Cell 2017 Sep;171(1):59-71.e21

McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, Cambridge CB2 3ER, UK; British Institute in Eastern Africa, Nairobi 30710, Kenya.

We assembled genome-wide data from 16 prehistoric Africans. We show that the anciently divergent lineage that comprises the primary ancestry of the southern African San had a wider distribution in the past, contributing approximately two-thirds of the ancestry of Malawi hunter-gatherers ∼8,100-2,500 years ago and approximately one-third of the ancestry of Tanzanian hunter-gatherers ∼1,400 years ago. We document how the spread of farmers from western Africa involved complete replacement of local hunter-gatherers in some regions, and we track the spread of herders by showing that the population of a ∼3,100-year-old pastoralist from Tanzania contributed ancestry to people from northeastern to southern Africa, including a ∼1,200-year-old southern African pastoralist. The deepest diversifications of African lineages were complex, involving either repeated gene flow among geographically disparate groups or a lineage more deeply diverging than that of the San contributing more to some western African populations than to others. We finally leverage ancient genomes to document episodes of natural selection in southern African populations. PAPERCLIP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2017.08.049DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5679310PMC
September 2017

Daily physical activity patterns of children living in an American Indian community.

J Phys Act Health 2013 Jan;10(1):48-53

Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA.

Background: Embracing a physically active lifestyle is especially important for American Indian (AI) children who are at a greater risk for hypokinetic diseases, particularly Type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to describe AI children's pedometer-determined physical activity (PA) segmented into prominent daily activity patterns.

Methods: Participants included 5th- and 6th-grade children (N = 77) attending school from 1 Southwestern US AI community. Children wore a pedometer (Yamax Digiwalker SW-200) for 7 consecutive days.

Results: Boys accumulated 12,621 (± 5385) steps/weekday and girls accumulated 11,640 (± 3695) steps/weekday of which 38% (4,779 ± 1271) and 35% (4,027 ± 1285) were accumulated at school for boys and girls, respectively. Physical education (PE) provided the single largest source of PA during school for both boys (25% or 3117 steps/day) and girls (23% or 2638 steps/day). Lunchtime recess provided 1612 (13%) and 1241 (11%) steps/day for boys and girls, respectively. Children were significantly less active on weekend days, accumulating 8066 ± 1959 (boys) and 6676 ± 1884 (girls).

Conclusions: Although children accumulate a majority of their steps outside of school, this study highlights the important contribution of PE to the overall PA accumulation of children living in AI communities. Further, PA programming during the weekend appears to be important for this population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jpah.10.1.48DOI Listing
January 2013

Pedometer-determined segmented physical activity patterns of fourth- and fifth-grade children.

J Phys Act Health 2011 Feb;8(2):279-86

Department of Kinesiology, Sport Studies, and Physical Education, College of Brockport, Brockport, NY, USA.

Background: The need to understand where and how much physical activity (PA) children accumulate has become important in assisting the development, implementation, and evaluation of PA interventions. The purpose of this study was to describe the daily PA patterns of children during the segmented school-week.

Methods: 829 children participated by wearing pedometers (Yamax-Digiwalker SW-200) for 5 consecutive days. Students recorded their steps at arrival/departure from school, Physical Education (PE), recess, and lunchtime.

Results: Boys took significantly more steps/day than girls during most PA opportunities; recess, t(440)=8.80, P<.01; lunch, t(811)=14.57, P<.01; outside of school, t(763)=5.34, P<.01; school, t(811)=10.61, P<.01; and total day, t(782)=7.69, P<.01. Boys and girls accumulated a similar number of steps t(711) .69, P=.09 during PE. For boys, lunchtime represented the largest single source of PA (13.4%) at school, followed by PE (12.7%) and recess (9.5%). For girls, PE was the largest (14.3%), followed by lunchtime (11.7%) and recess (8.3%).

Conclusion: An understanding of the contributions of the in-school segments can serve as baseline measures for practitioners and researchers to use in school-based PA interventions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/jpah.8.2.279DOI Listing
February 2011

Preservice teachers' belief systems toward curricular outcomes for physical education.

Res Q Exerc Sport 2010 Jun;81(2):189-98

Division of Educational Leadership and Innovation at Arizona State University, Mesa, AZ 85212, USA.

This study was grounded in the belief systems and physical activity literature and investigated preservice teachers' belief systems toward curricular outcomes for physical education programs. Preservice teachers (N = 486; men = 62%, women = 38%) from 18 U.S. colleges/universities shared their beliefs about curricular outcomes. Preservice teachers completed a previously validated belief systems instrument designed to measure the relative importance of four outcome goals for programs (physical activity/fitness, self-actualization, motor skill development, and social development). Internal consistency reliability for the instrument was .98. A confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated a good fit of the current sample to the hypothesized outcomes model. Multivariate analysis of variance results revealed a significant interaction in outcome preservice teachers' priorities for year in school by region. The teachers' views also differed on the important outcome goals for physical education. Two critical "tensions" are discussed: (a) the need to examine more fully the consistency of preservice teacher/teacher belief systems, and (b) implications for teacher education and professional development programming. It is important to heed prospective teachers' voices and address their belief systems in teacher education programs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02701367.2010.10599666DOI Listing
June 2010
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