Publications by authors named "Matthew D Grant"

3 Publications

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Transthoracic Echocardiography: Beginner's Guide with Emphasis on Blind Spots as Identified with CT and MRI.

Radiographics 2021 Jul-Aug;41(4):1022-1042. Epub 2021 Jun 11.

From the Departments of Radiology (M.D.G., R.D.M., S.D.K., R.M.B., J.D.M., D.W.G., E.A.R.) and Cardiology (J.M.R.), Madigan Army Medical Center, 9040 Jackson Ave, Tacoma, WA 98431; and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Md (M.D.G., J.M.R., D.W.G., E.A.R.).

Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the primary initial imaging modality in cardiac imaging. Advantages include portability, safety, availability, and ability to assess the morphology and physiology of the heart in a noninvasive manner. Because of this, many patients who undergo advanced imaging with CT or MRI will have undergone prior TTE, particularly when cardiac CT angiography or cardiac MRI is performed. In the modern era, the increasing interconnectivity of picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) has made these images more available for comparison. Therefore, radiologists who interpret chest imaging studies should have a basic understanding of TTE, including its strengths and limitations, to make accurate comparisons and assist in rendering a diagnosis or avoiding a misdiagnosis. The authors present the standard TTE views along with multiplanar reformatted CT images for correlation. This is followed by examples of limitations of TTE, focusing on potential blind spots, which have been placed in seven categories on the basis of the structures involved: pericardium (thickening, calcification, effusions, cysts, masses), aorta (dissection, intramural hematoma, penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer), left ventricular apex (infarcts, aneurysms, thrombus, apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy), cardiac valves (complications of native and prosthetic valves), left atrial appendage (thrombus), coronary arteries (origins, calcifications, fistulas, aneurysms), and extracardiac structures (primary and metastatic masses). . RSNA, 2021.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.2021200142DOI Listing
June 2021

Are We Speaking the Same Language? Communicating Diagnostic Probability in the Radiology Report.

AJR Am J Roentgenol 2021 03 21;216(3):806-811. Epub 2021 Jan 21.

Department of Radiology, Madigan Army Medical Center, 9040 Jackson Ave, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Tacoma, WA 98431.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of agreement in diagnostic probability for selected phrases among radiologists and emergency medicine (EM) physicians. A survey was distributed to the radiologists and EM physicians at our academic institution. Respondents selected the degree of diagnostic probability they believe was conveyed by 18 commonly used phrases chosen from studies in the radiology literature. Potential responses for the degree of diagnostic probability were < 10%, ≈ 25%, ≈ 50%, ≈ 75%, and > 90%. Seventy-eight percent (28/36) of EM residents and 56% (14/25) of EM attending physicians (combined fellows and attending physicians) completed the survey; 83% (15/18) of radiology residents and 81% (17/21) of radiology attending physicians completed the survey. There was a high degree of shared understanding for most phrases between the departments except for the phrase "compatible with," which was associated with a higher degree of diagnostic probability by radiologists than by EM physicians ( = .02). Although no term was significantly more specific than any other within the ≈ 50% category or below, "most likely" and "diagnostic of" were significantly more specific than other terms in the ≈ 75% and > 90% categories, respectively. The results of this study show a high degree of shared understanding between radiologists and EM physicians for most of the phrases (17/18) in the survey. The only phrase that showed a significant difference was "compatible with." These results can be used to generate diagnostic probability groups with suggested phrases that can be used when creating radiology reports, thereby improving communication with the emergency department.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2214/AJR.20.23328DOI Listing
March 2021

Ultrasound-Guided Biceps Tendon Sheath Injections Frequently Extravasate Into the Glenohumeral Joint.

Arthroscopy 2021 Jun 13;37(6):1711-1716. Epub 2021 Jan 13.

Madigan Army Medical Center, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, U.S.A.

Purpose: To evaluate the frequency of glenohumeral joint extravasation of ultrasound (US)-guided biceps tendon sheath injections.

Methods: Fifty shoulders with a clinical diagnosis of bicipital tenosynovitis pain received a US-guided biceps sheath injection with anesthetic, steroid, and contrast (5.0 mL mixture) followed immediately by orthogonal radiographs to localize the anatomic distribution of the injection. Radiographic evaluation of contrast localization was determined and interobserver reliability calculated.

Results: All 50 postinjection radiographs (100%) demonstrated contrast within the biceps tendon sheath. In addition, 30 of 50 (60%) radiographs also revealed contrast in the glenohumeral joint. Interobserver reliability for determination of intraarticular contrast was good (kappa value 0.87).

Conclusions: US-guided bicipital sheath injections reproducibly result in intrasheath placement of injection fluid. Bicipital sheath injections performed with 5 mL of volume result in partial extravasation into the joint 60% of the time. These data may be useful for surgeons who use the results of diagnostic biceps injections for diagnosis and surgical decision-making.

Level Of Evidence: III, prospective cohort study, diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2020.12.238DOI Listing
June 2021
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