Publications by authors named "Matthew Burstein"

7 Publications

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The Early (2009-2017) Experience With Robot-assisted Cholecystectomy in New York State.

Ann Surg 2021 09;274(3):e245-e252

Department of Surgery, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY.

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine real-life patterns of care and patient outcomes associated with robot-assisted cholecystectomy (RAC) in New York State (NYS).

Background: Although robotic assistance may offer some technological advantages, RACs are associated with higher procedural costs and longer operating times compared to traditional laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LCs). Evidence on long-term patient outcomes after RAC from large population-based datasets remains limited and inconsistent.

Methods: Using NYS inpatient and ambulatory surgery data from the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (2009-2017), we conducted bivariate and multivariate analyses to examine patterns of utilization, complications, and secondary procedures following cholecystectomies.

Results: Among 299,306 minimally invasive cholecystectomies performed in NYS between 2009 and 2017, one thousand one hundred eighteen (0.4%) were robot-assisted. Compared to those undergoing LC, RAC patients were older, travelled further for surgery, and were more likely to have public insurance and preoperative comorbidities. RAC versus LC patients were more significantly likely to have conversions to open procedure (4.9% vs 2.8%), bile duct injuries (1.3% vs 0.4%), and major reconstructive interventions (0.6% vs 0.1%), longer median length of stay (3 vs 1 day), readmissions (7.3% vs 4.4%), and higher 12-month post-index surgery hospital charges (P < 0.01 for all estimates). Other postoperative complications decreased over time for LC but remained unchanged for RAC patients.

Conclusions: Patients receiving RAC in NYS experienced higher rates of complications compared to LC patients. Addressing patient-, surgeon-, and system-level factors associated with intra/postoperative complications and applying recently promulgated safe cholecystectomy strategies coupled with advanced imaging modalities like fluorescence cholangiography to RAC may improve patient outcomes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000004932DOI Listing
September 2021

Incidental Diagnosis of Pseudomyxoma Peritonei After Emergent Splenectomy.

Am Surg 2020 Dec 19:3134820954822. Epub 2020 Dec 19.

Department of General Surgery, Digestive Disease and Surgery Institute, 2569Cleveland Clinic, OH, USA.

Pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) is a rare disease associated with mucinous ascites. Pseudomyxoma peritonei has a low incidence and is difficult to diagnose. Pseudomyxoma peritonei usually presents with vague abdominal pain after significant progression. Computed tomography imaging is the most common modality for diagnosis; however, diagnosis as a result of surgical intervention in cases of acute abdomen has become increasingly common. We present a unique case of a 66-year-old man who was incidentally diagnosed with PMP after undergoing an emergent splenectomy for presumed blunt trauma. The patient presented to the emergency room with abdominal pain, shortness of breath, and diaphoresis. Computed tomography imaging revealed a splenic hematoma with suspicion of extravasation and a moderate amount of free intraperitoneal fluid consistent with blood. The patient was taken to the operating room emergently for an emergent splenectomy where splenic laceration was noted, as were multiple areas of nodularity in the omentum and cecum. Histologic evaluation of these lesions led to the diagnosis of PMP. After recovery from his initial splenectomy, the patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, cytoreductive surgery, cholecystectomy, removal of appendiceal mucocele, and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy without complication. Final pathology was consistent with PMP and primary mucinous appendiceal adenocarcinoma. This case highlights an unusual presentation of PMP for a patient who was undergoing surgery for presumed splenic trauma. Surgeons must maintain a high index of suspicion and should perform histological evaluation when such unexpected findings are encountered.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0003134820954822DOI Listing
December 2020

Frailty predicts risk of life-threatening complications and mortality after pancreatic resections.

Surgery 2016 10 18;160(4):987-996. Epub 2016 Aug 18.

Department of Surgery, Digestive Disease Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

Background: To assess the effect of frailty on morbidity and mortality after partial pancreatectomy.

Methods: A retrospective analysis of National Surgical Quality Improvement Project from 2005-2010 was conducted. A modified frailty index was created based on previously validated methodology. Patients were classified as nonfrail, low frailty, intermediate frailty, and frail. Outcomes of pancreatoduodenectomy and distal pancreatectomy were examined.

Results: In the study, 13,020 patients were analyzed (8,729 pancreatoduodenectomy and 4,291 distal pancreatectomy). Among the pancreatoduodenectomy and distal pancreatectomy patients, frail patients regardless of the degree of frailty were older, more likely male, had a greater body mass index, lower serum albumin, and greater weight loss compared with the nonfrail patients (all P ≤ .05). Postoperatively, a stepwise increased risk of grade 4 complications (Clavien/Dindo) and mortality was noted from nonfrail to frail patients. Every 1-point increase in modified frailty index was associated with a significantly increased risk of grade 4 complications (∼2-6 times) and mortality (∼2-10 times) from low-frail to frail (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, albumin, weight loss, and type of pancreatectomy). An abbreviated frailty index incorporating 8 variables was as predictive as the modified frailty index (P = .68).

Conclusion: An 11-point frailty index as measured in National Surgical Quality Improvement Project predicts serious complications and death after pancreatectomy. A modification of this index with 8 factors continues to have similar predictive ability. Consideration of frailty may be beneficial prior to the pancreatic surgeon and particularly in discussion of operative risk and selection of patients who might receive benefit from pre-operative optimization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2016.07.010DOI Listing
October 2016

FolC2-mediated folate metabolism contributes to suppression of inflammation by probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri.

Microbiologyopen 2016 Oct 28;5(5):802-818. Epub 2016 Jun 28.

Department of Pathology & Immunology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.

Bacterial-derived compounds from the intestinal microbiome modulate host mucosal immunity. Identification and mechanistic studies of these compounds provide insights into host-microbial mutualism. Specific Lactobacillus reuteri strains suppress production of the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and are protective in a mouse model of colitis. Human-derived L. reuteri strain ATCC PTA 6475 suppresses intestinal inflammation and produces 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolic acid polyglutamates. Insertional mutagenesis identified the bifunctional dihydrofolate synthase/folylpolyglutamate synthase type 2 (folC2) gene as essential for 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolic acid polyglutamate biosynthesis, as well as for suppression of TNF production by activated human monocytes, and for the anti-inflammatory effect of L. reuteri 6475 in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced mouse model of acute colitis. In contrast, folC encodes the enzyme responsible for folate polyglutamylation but does not impact TNF suppression by L. reuteri. Comparative transcriptomics between wild-type and mutant L. reuteri strains revealed additional genes involved in immunomodulation, including previously identified hdc genes involved in histidine to histamine conversion. The folC2 mutant yielded diminished hdc gene cluster expression and diminished histamine production, suggesting a link between folate and histadine/histamine metabolism. The identification of genes and gene networks regulating production of bacterial-derived immunoregulatory molecules may lead to improved anti-inflammatory strategies for digestive diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mbo3.371DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5061717PMC
October 2016

Comprehensive genomic analysis identifies novel subtypes and targets of triple-negative breast cancer.

Clin Cancer Res 2015 Apr 10;21(7):1688-98. Epub 2014 Sep 10.

Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.

Purpose: Genomic profiling studies suggest that triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease. In this study, we sought to define TNBC subtypes and identify subtype-specific markers and targets.

Experimental Design: RNA and DNA profiling analyses were conducted on 198 TNBC tumors [estrogen receptor (ER) negativity defined as Allred scale value ≤ 2] with >50% cellularity (discovery set: n = 84; validation set: n = 114) collected at Baylor College of Medicine (Houston, TX). An external dataset of seven publically accessible TNBC studies was used to confirm results. DNA copy number, disease-free survival (DFS), and disease-specific survival (DSS) were analyzed independently using these datasets.

Results: We identified and confirmed four distinct TNBC subtypes: (i) luminal androgen receptor (AR; LAR), (ii) mesenchymal (MES), (iii) basal-like immunosuppressed (BLIS), and (iv) basal-like immune-activated (BLIA). Of these, prognosis is worst for BLIS tumors and best for BLIA tumors for both DFS (log-rank test: P = 0.042 and 0.041, respectively) and DSS (log-rank test: P = 0.039 and 0.029, respectively). DNA copy number analysis produced two major groups (LAR and MES/BLIS/BLIA) and suggested that gene amplification drives gene expression in some cases [FGFR2 (BLIS)]. Putative subtype-specific targets were identified: (i) LAR: androgen receptor and the cell surface mucin MUC1, (ii) MES: growth factor receptors [platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor A; c-Kit], (iii) BLIS: an immunosuppressing molecule (VTCN1), and (iv) BLIA: Stat signal transduction molecules and cytokines.

Conclusion: There are four stable TNBC subtypes characterized by the expression of distinct molecular profiles that have distinct prognoses. These studies identify novel subtype-specific targets that can be targeted in the future for the effective treatment of TNBCs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-14-0432DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4362882PMC
April 2015

Novel somatic and germline mutations in intracranial germ cell tumours.

Nature 2014 Jul 4;511(7508):241-5. Epub 2014 Jun 4.

1] Texas Children's Cancer and Hematology Centers, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Medical Scientist Training Program, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Intracranial germ cell tumours (IGCTs) are a group of rare heterogeneous brain tumours that are clinically and histologically similar to the more common gonadal GCTs. IGCTs show great variation in their geographical and gender distribution, histological composition and treatment outcomes. The incidence of IGCTs is historically five- to eightfold greater in Japan and other East Asian countries than in Western countries, with peak incidence near the time of puberty. About half of the tumours are located in the pineal region. The male-to-female incidence ratio is approximately 3-4:1 overall, but is even higher for tumours located in the pineal region. Owing to the scarcity of tumour specimens available for research, little is currently known about this rare disease. Here we report the analysis of 62 cases by next-generation sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array and expression array. We find the KIT/RAS signalling pathway frequently mutated in more than 50% of IGCTs, including novel recurrent somatic mutations in KIT, its downstream mediators KRAS and NRAS, and its negative regulator CBL. Novel somatic alterations in the AKT/mTOR pathway included copy number gains of the AKT1 locus at 14q32.33 in 19% of patients, with corresponding upregulation of AKT1 expression. We identified loss-of-function mutations in BCORL1, a transcriptional co-repressor and tumour suppressor. We report significant enrichment of novel and rare germline variants in JMJD1C, which codes for a histone demethylase and is a coactivator of the androgen receptor, among Japanese IGCT patients. This study establishes a molecular foundation for understanding the biology of IGCTs and suggests potentially promising therapeutic strategies focusing on the inhibition of KIT/RAS activation and the AKT1/mTOR pathway.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13296DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4532372PMC
July 2014

Pediatric data sharing in genomic research: attitudes and preferences of parents.

Pediatrics 2014 Apr 10;133(4):690-7. Epub 2014 Mar 10.

Structural and Computation Biology & Molecular Biophysics Graduate Program.

Objective: In the United States, data from federally funded genomics studies are stored in national databases, which may be accessible to anyone online (public release) or only to qualified researchers (restricted release). The availability of such data exposes participants to privacy risk and limits the ability to withdraw from research. This exposure is especially challenging for pediatric participants, who are enrolled in studies with parental permission. The current study examines genomic research participants' attitudes to explore differences in data sharing (DS) preferences between parents of pediatric patients and adult patients.

Methods: A total of 113 parents of pediatric patients and 196 adult participants from 6 genomics studies were randomly assigned to 3 experimental consent forms. Participants were invited to a follow-up structured interview exploring DS preferences, study understanding, and attitudes. Descriptive analyses and regression models were built on responses.

Results: Most parents (73.5%) and adult participants (90.3%) ultimately consented to broad public release. However, parents were significantly more restrictive in their data release decisions, not because of understanding or perceived benefits of participation but rather autonomy and control. Parents want to be more involved in the decision about DS and are significantly more concerned than adult participants about unknown future risks.

Conclusions: Parents have the same altruistic motivations and grasp of genomics studies as adult participants. However, they are more concerned about future risks to their child, which probably motivates them to choose more restrictive DS options, but only when such options are made available.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2013-1592DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3966500PMC
April 2014
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