Publications by authors named "Matis Märtson"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Cultural bias in the AAP's 2012 Technical Report and Policy Statement on male circumcision.

Pediatrics 2013 Apr 18;131(4):796-800. Epub 2013 Mar 18.

Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen and Center for Sexology Research, Department of Clinical Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recently released its new Technical Report and Policy Statement on male circumcision, concluding that current evidence indicates that the health benefits of newborn male circumcision outweigh the risks. The technical report is based on the scrutiny of a large number of complex scientific articles. Therefore, while striving for objectivity, the conclusions drawn by the 8 task force members reflect what these individual physicians perceived as trustworthy evidence. Seen from the outside, cultural bias reflecting the normality of nontherapeutic male circumcision in the United States seems obvious, and the report's conclusions are different from those reached by physicians in other parts of the Western world, including Europe, Canada, and Australia. In this commentary, a different view is presented by non-US-based physicians and representatives of general medical associations and societies for pediatrics, pediatric surgery, and pediatric urology in Northern Europe. To these authors, only 1 of the arguments put forward by the American Academy of Pediatrics has some theoretical relevance in relation to infant male circumcision; namely, the possible protection against urinary tract infections in infant boys, which can easily be treated with antibiotics without tissue loss. The other claimed health benefits, including protection against HIV/AIDS, genital herpes, genital warts, and penile cancer, are questionable, weak, and likely to have little public health relevance in a Western context, and they do not represent compelling reasons for surgery before boys are old enough to decide for themselves.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-2896DOI Listing
April 2013

Hydroxyapatite coating of cellulose sponge does not improve its osteogenic potency in rat bone.

Acta Biomater 2005 Sep 15;1(5):535-44. Epub 2005 Jul 15.

Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland.

Regenerated cellulose sponges were coated biomimetically with hydroxyapatite to increase their osteogenic properties. Induction of apatite precipitation was carried out with bioactive glass in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 24 h and the final coating was carried out in 1.5 x concentrated SBF for 14 days. Biomimetically mineralized and non-mineralized sponges were then implanted into standard size femoral cortical defects of rats, and the invasion of bone into the implant was followed up to one year. The apatite coating did not improve the osteoconductive property of cellulose in this rat cortical defect model. In fact, it generated a strong and highly cellular inflammatory reaction and less osteoid tissue. The biomimetic implants contained more immunodetectable TGFbeta1 (a strong stimulator of fibroblast activity) than untreated implants, and also bound more TGFbeta1 in vitro, which could, at least in part, explain the fibrotic invasion of biomimetically mineralized sponges.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actbio.2005.05.003DOI Listing
September 2005

Long-term evaluation of porous poly(epsilon-caprolactone-co-L-lactide) as a bone-filling material.

J Biomed Mater Res A 2005 Nov;75(2):308-15

Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FIN-20520 Turku, Finland.

Porous poly(epsilon-caprolactone-co-L-lactide) (P(CL-co-LA, wt % ca. 5/95) sponges were prepared, coated biomimetically with CaP/apatite, and implanted with noncoated control sponges into rat femur cortical defects and dorsal subcutaneous space. The implants were inspected histologically at 2, 4, and 33 weeks after the operation. All implants were filled with fibrovascular tissue within 4 weeks. The femur implants were partially ossified with compact bone, which in the CaP-coated sponges was less mature and more fragmented. Approximately equal amounts of bone were observed in both types of implants. The polymer induced a mild inflammatory reaction with foreign body giant cells but no accumulation of fluid. Degradation of the polymer was slow; most of it was found intact at 33 weeks in histological samples. Nondegraded polymer seems to prevent complete ossification. Cultured osteoblasts proliferated well on apatite-coated material, whereas only a few cells were seen on noncoated material. Thus CaP/apatite coating helped the attachment of osteoblasts in cell cultures but did not offer any advantage in bone formation over noncoated material in vivo. We conclude that a shorter degradation time of P(CL-co-LA) is needed to create an optimal implant. Furthermore, in vivo experiments seem to be necessary for the estimation of osteopromotive properties of a biomaterial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.30418DOI Listing
November 2005