Publications by authors named "Mathieu Marie-Laure"

5 Publications

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Damaging de novo missense variants in EEF1A2 lead to a developmental and degenerative epileptic-dyskinetic encephalopathy.

Hum Mutat 2020 07 6;41(7):1263-1279. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

Department of Genetics, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Heterozygous de novo variants in the eukaryotic elongation factor EEF1A2 have previously been described in association with intellectual disability and epilepsy but never functionally validated. Here we report 14 new individuals with heterozygous EEF1A2 variants. We functionally validate multiple variants as protein-damaging using heterologous expression and complementation analysis. Our findings allow us to confirm multiple variants as pathogenic and broaden the phenotypic spectrum to include dystonia/choreoathetosis, and in some cases a degenerative course with cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. Pathogenic variants appear to act via a haploinsufficiency mechanism, disrupting both the protein synthesis and integrated stress response functions of EEF1A2. Our studies provide evidence that EEF1A2 is highly intolerant to variation and that de novo pathogenic variants lead to an epileptic-dyskinetic encephalopathy with both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative features. Developmental features may be driven by impaired synaptic protein synthesis during early brain development while progressive symptoms may be linked to an impaired ability to handle cytotoxic stressors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.24015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7292794PMC
July 2020

Chromatin remodeling dysfunction extends the etiological spectrum of schizophrenia: a case report.

BMC Med Genet 2020 01 8;21(1):10. Epub 2020 Jan 8.

Institut Neuromyogène, métabolisme énergétique et développement durable, CNRS UMR 5310, INSERM U1217, Université de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France.

Background: The role of deleterious copy number variations in schizophrenia is well established while data regarding pathogenic variations remain scarce. We report for the first time a case of schizophrenia in a child with a pathogenic mutation of the chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2 (CHD2) gene.

Case Presentation: The proband was the second child of unrelated parents. Anxiety and sleep disorders appeared at the age of 10 months. He presented febrile seizures and, at the age of 8, two generalized tonic-clonic seizures. At the age of 10, emotional withdrawal emerged, along with a flat affect, disorganization and paranoid ideation, without seizures. He began to talk and giggle with self. Eventually, the patient presented daily auditory and visual hallucinations. The diagnosis of childhood onset schizophrenia (DSM V) was then evoked. Brain imaging was unremarkable. Wakefulness electroencephalography showed a normal background and some bilateral spike-wave discharges that did not explain the psychosis features. A comparative genomic hybridization array (180 K, Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA) revealed an 867-kb 16p13.3 duplication, interpreted as a variant of unknown significance confirmed by a quantitative PCR that also showed its maternal inheritance. Risperidone (1,5 mg per day), led to clinical improvement. At the age of 11, an explosive relapse of epilepsy occurred with daily seizures of various types. The sequencing of a panel for monogenic epileptic disorders and Sanger sequencing revealed a de novo pathogenic heterozygous transition in CHD2 (NM_001271.3: c.4003G > T).

Conclusions: This case underlines that schizophrenia may be, sometimes, underpinned by a Mendelian disease. It addresses the question of systematic genetic investigations in the presence of warning signs such as a childhood onset of the schizophrenia or a resistant epilepsy. It points that, in the absence of pathogenic copy number variation, the investigations should also include a search for pathogenic variations, which means that some of the patients with schizophrenia should benefit from Next Generation Sequencing tools. Last but not least, CHD2 encodes a member of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding (CHD) family involved in chromatin remodeling. This observation adds schizophrenia to the phenotypic spectrum of chromodomain remodeling disorders, which may lead to innovative therapeutic approaches.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12881-019-0946-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6950831PMC
January 2020

Genetic abnormalities in a large cohort of Coffin-Siris syndrome patients.

J Hum Genet 2019 Dec 17;64(12):1173-1186. Epub 2019 Sep 17.

Asahikawa-Kosei General Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan.

Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS, MIM#135900) is a congenital disorder characterized by coarse facial features, intellectual disability, and hypoplasia of the fifth digit and nails. Pathogenic variants for CSS have been found in genes encoding proteins in the BAF (BRG1-associated factor) chromatin-remodeling complex. To date, more than 150 CSS patients with pathogenic variants in nine BAF-related genes have been reported. We previously reported 71 patients of whom 39 had pathogenic variants. Since then, we have recruited an additional 182 CSS-suspected patients. We performed comprehensive genetic analysis on these 182 patients and on the previously unresolved 32 patients, targeting pathogenic single nucleotide variants, short insertions/deletions and copy number variations (CNVs). We confirmed 78 pathogenic variations in 78 patients. Pathogenic variations in ARID1B, SMARCB1, SMARCA4, ARID1A, SOX11, SMARCE1, and PHF6 were identified in 48, 8, 7, 6, 4, 1, and 1 patients, respectively. In addition, we found three CNVs including SMARCA2. Of particular note, we found a partial deletion of SMARCB1 in one CSS patient and we thoroughly investigated the resulting abnormal transcripts.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s10038-019-0667-4DOI Listing
December 2019

Electrical status epilepticus in sleep, a constitutive feature of Christianson syndrome?

Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2018 Nov 21;22(6):1124-1132. Epub 2018 Jul 21.

Department of Medical Genetics, Lyon University Hospital, Lyon, France; Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France; INSERM U1028, CNRS UMR5292, Lyon Neuroscience Research Centre (CRNL), Lyon, France. Electronic address:

Christianson syndrome (CS) is a X-linked neurodevelopmental disorder, including severe intellectual disability (ID), progressive microcephaly, ataxia, autistic behaviour (ASD), near absent speech, and epilepsy. Electrical status epilepticus in sleep (ESES) has been reported in two patients. We describe five male patients from three unrelated families with Christianson syndrome caused by a pathogenic nucleotide variation or a copy-number variation involving SLC9A6. ESES was present in three out of the five patients in the critical age window between 4 and 8 years. All patients presented with severe intellectual disability, autistic features, and hyperactivity. Epilepsy onset occurred within the first two years of life. Seizures were of various types. In the two boys with a 20-years follow-up, epilepsy was drug-resistant during childhood, and became less active in early adolescence. Psychomotor regression was noted in two patients presenting with ESES. It was difficult to assess to what extent ESES could have contributed to the pathophysiological process, leading to regression of the already very limited communication skills. The two published case reports and our observation suggests that ESES could be a constitutive feature of Christianson syndrome, as it has already been shown for other Mendelian epileptic disorders, such as GRIN2A and CNKSR2-related developmental epileptic encephalopathies. Sleep EEG should be performed in patients with Christianson syndrome between 4 and 8 years of age. ESES occurring in the context of ID, ASD and severe speech delay, could be helpful to make a diagnosis of CS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpn.2018.07.004DOI Listing
November 2018

Clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of four unrelated patients carrying 2p14 microdeletions.

Am J Med Genet A 2017 Aug 9;173(8):2268-2274. Epub 2017 Jun 9.

Hospices Civils de Lyon, Service de Génétique, Centre de Référence Anomalies du Développement, Bron, France.

We report the clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of four unrelated patients from France and Spain, carrying 2p14 microdeletions and presenting with intellectual disability and dysmorphisms. 2p14 microdeletions are very rare. Seven patients have been reported so far harboring deletions including 2p14p15 and encompassing OTX1, whose haploinsufficiency is frequently associated with genitourinary defects. To date, only one patient has been reported carrying a more proximal 2p14 microdeletion which does not include OTX1. Here, we report three further patients carrying proximal 2p14 microdeletions not including OTX1 and one patient carrying a more distal 2p14p15 microdeletion including this gene, providing new insights into the associated phenotypic spectrum. First, our study and a review of the literature showed that 3/4 patients carrying proximal 2p14 microdeletions had sensorineural hearing loss, suggesting the presence of a previously unreported deafness-causing gene in this chromosomal region. Second, one patient developed a progressive cardiomyopathy, suggesting that a cardiac follow-up should be systematically warranted even in the absence of congenital heart disease. We speculate that ACTR2 and MEIS1 might respectively play a role in the pathogenesis of the observed deafness and cardiomyopathy. Third, we observed other previously unreported features such as glaucoma, retinopathy, and mild midline abnormalities including short corpus callosum, hypospadias and anteriorly placed anus. Finally, the patient carrying a 2p14p15 deletion including OTX1 had normal kidneys and genitalia, thus confirming that OTX1 haploinsufficiency is not invariably associated with genitourinary defects. In conclusion, our study contributes significantly to delineate the phenotypic spectrum of 2p14 microdeletions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.38307DOI Listing
August 2017