Publications by authors named "Masoumeh Atefi"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

A Systematic Review of the Clinical Use of Curcumin for the Management of Gastrointestinal Diseases.

Adv Exp Med Biol 2021 ;1291:295-326

Biotechnology Research Center, Pharmaceutical Technology Institute, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases are highly prevalent worldwide, with considerable morbidity and mortality. Curcumin has been used for many years as a plant-derived product for the management of various conditions such as abdominal pain and poor digestion. This systematic review was undertaken with the aim of investigating the effect of curcumin or turmeric supplementation on GI diseases. A comprehensive systematic search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar up to March 2020 to identify clinical trials assessing the effect of curcumin/turmeric alone or in combination with other herbs or nutrients on GI diseases. Twenty-one studies comprising 1478 GI patients were included in the study. Four out of seven studies showed a beneficial effect of curcumin/turmeric supplementation on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and six out of seven showed positive effects of these herbs on ulcerative colitis. Two out of four studies highlighted the potential role of curcumin/turmeric in eradication of H. pylori infection. Both studies conducted on peptic ulcer disease and two out of four studies performed on Crohn's disease demonstrated positive effects of curcumin/turmeric supplementation. One study showed curcumin supplementation had no effect on familial adenomatous polyposis. However, in another study, curcumin had favorable effects on proctosigmoiditis. Nine studies reported some minor adverse effects. The results of this systematic review suggest a beneficial effect of curcumin/turmeric supplementation on the management of GI diseases. More randomized clinical controlled trials are needed to confirm these results.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-56153-6_18DOI Listing
August 2021

The effect of cocoa/dark chocolate consumption on lipid profile, glycemia, and blood pressure in diabetic patients: A meta-analysis of observational studies.

Phytother Res 2021 Jun 5. Epub 2021 Jun 5.

Department of Clinical Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran.

Due to the increasing rate of cardiovascular disease and related risk factors in the worldin recent decades, the present meta-analysis was performed to investigate the effects ofcocoa/chocolate consumption on lipid profile, glycemia, and blood pressure control in diabetic patients. A systematic search of the databases PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochran Library was performed up to July 2020. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using cocoa/dark chocolate in diabetic patients were included in the study. The search results were limited to English-language publications. Eight RCTs, including 433 participants, were selected for this meta-analysis. Pooled analysis indicated a significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol LDL-c levels (WMD: -15.49 mg/dl; 95% CI: -24.56, -6.42, p = .001) and fasting blood sugar (FBS) concentrations (WMD: -6.88 mg/dl; 95% CI: -13.28, -0.48, p = .03) following cocoa/dark chocolate consumption. The analysis of papers included in current study indicates that the consumption of cocoa/dark chocolate reduced the serum fasting blood glucose (FBS) and LDL cholesterol concentrations. However, further high quality trials are essential for confirming the clinical efficacy of cocoa/dark chocolate consumption on complete metabolic profile.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ptr.7183DOI Listing
June 2021

The effect of barberry (Berberis vulgaris L.) supplementation on blood pressure: A systematic review and meta-analysis of the randomized controlled trials.

Complement Ther Med 2021 Jan 4;56:102608. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Food Security Research Center and Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Electronic address:

Objective: We identified and quantified the results of randomized clinical trials by examining the effect of barberry supplementation on blood pressure.

Methods: We conducted a comprehensive search in the medical bibliographic database up to May 2020 on randomized clinical trials investigating the effect of barberry supplementation on adult blood pressure. Intensive literature searches and data extraction according to a prefixed scheme was performed independently by two investigators.

Results: Through 5 randomized clinical trial studies, 350 subjects with 175 cases for the intervention group and 175 cases for control group were included in our study. The intervention period ranged from 4 to 12 weeks. In general, barberry supplementation did not have a significant effect on systolic blood pressure (WMD: -4.15 mmHg; 95 % CI: -10.3, 1.99, P = 0.185) and diastolic blood pressure (WMD: -1.22 mmHg; 95 % CI: -6.26, 3.82, P = 0.635). Our study was heterogeneous and subgroup analysis did not eliminate heterogeneity.

Conclusion: Totally, based on this study, we cannot conclude that barberry supplementation has beneficial effects on blood pressure. Also, all included studies had limitations such as different in geographical situations, Dietary of participants, health conditions, and pharmacological forms of berberis. Therefore, further study in this area is recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2020.102608DOI Listing
January 2021

The effects of canola and olive oils on insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in women with type 2 diabetes: a randomized and controlled trial.

J Diabetes Metab Disord 2018 Dec 23;17(2):85-91. Epub 2018 May 23.

1Nutrition Research Center, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: A number of studies have shown that consumption of vegetable oils may improve diabetes complications including inflammatory response and oxidative stress, but no study has been done on the effects of canola oil (CO) and olive oil (OO) consumption in patients with type 2 diabetes. This clinical trial was done to compare the effects of CO and OO on insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress in women with type 2 diabetes.

Methods: This randomized controlled clinical trial was done on 77 type 2 diabetic women. 4 weeks before the intervention, lipid-lowering drugs intakes were cut under the supervision of an endocrinologist. The participants were randomly divided into 2 intervention groups (Balanced diet +30 g/day CO or OO) and one control group (Balanced diet +30 g/day of sunflower oil (SFO)). Dietary intakes were assessed using three 24-h food records at baseline and at weeks 4 and 8 of the interventions. At baseline and after 8 weeks, height, weight, waist circumference, fasting blood sugar (FBS), serum insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured.

Results: After the intervention in the inter-group analysis, CRP level was reduced significantly in CO and OO groups but no significant changes were observed in other factors. CRP reductions were also significant between all of the groups but not for other factors.

Conclusions: Replacing CO and OO with SFO as part of daily dietary fat in the diet of people with type 2 diabetes is recommended for reducing Inflammation and Oxidative Stress. This study is approved by the Ethics Committee of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (IR.SUMS.REC.1394.27) and is recorded in the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (IRCT2015062722818N1).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40200-018-0343-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6405399PMC
December 2018

Greater adherence to the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern is associated with lower blood pressure in healthy Iranian primary school children.

Eur J Nutr 2018 Jun 21;57(4):1449-1458. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Nutrition Research Center, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Purpose: The dietary determinants of children blood pressure (BP) are poorly understood. We examined the association between adherence to the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern and BP in healthy Iranian primary school children.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among a representative sample (n = 407) of healthy Shirazi students aged 6-12 years. Subjects' systolic and diastolic BP were measured by a validated oscillometric BP monitor. Usual dietary intakes over the past 12 months were assessed using a valid and reproducible 168-item semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire via face-to-face interviews. A DASH score was calculated for each subject based on his/her energy-adjusted intakes of 8 major dietary components emphasized or minimized in the DASH dietary pattern. The higher the DASH score of a subject, the more his/her adherence to the DASH dietary pattern.

Results: After controlling for several potential confounders in the analysis of covariance models, multivariable-adjusted means of systolic and mean BP of subjects in the highest tertile of DASH score were significantly lower than those in the lowest tertile (for systolic BP: mean difference -6.2 mmHg, P = 0.010; and for mean BP: mean difference -5.4 mmHg, P = 0.013). Furthermore, a similar but statistically insignificant difference was found in terms of multivariable-adjusted means of diastolic BP (mean difference -3.9 mmHg, P = 0.146).

Conclusions: The findings suggest that greater adherence to the DASH dietary pattern is associated with lower BP in healthy Iranian primary school children. However, future prospective studies of adequate methodological quality are warranted to confirm these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1423-1DOI Listing
June 2018

A Western dietary pattern is associated with higher blood pressure in Iranian adolescents.

Eur J Nutr 2017 Feb 3;56(1):399-408. Epub 2015 Nov 3.

Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Research Center for Health Sciences, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Purpose: The dietary determinants of adolescent blood pressure (BP) are not well understood. We determined the association between major dietary patterns and BP in a sample of Iranian adolescents.

Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among a representative sample (n = 557) of Shirazi adolescents aged 12-19 years. Participants' systolic and diastolic BP was measured using a validated oscillometric BP monitor. Usual dietary intakes during the past 12 months were assessed using a valid and reproducible 168-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire through face-to-face interviews. Principal component factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns based on a set of 25 predefined food groups.

Results: Overall, three major dietary patterns were identified, among which only the Western pattern (abundant in soft drinks, sweets and desserts, salt, mayonnaise, tea and coffee, salty snacks, high-fat dairy products, French fries, and red or processed meats) had a significant association with BP. After adjusting for potential confounders in the analysis of covariance models, multivariable adjusted means of the systolic and mean BP of subjects in the highest tertile of the Western pattern score were significantly higher than those in the lowest tertile (for systolic BP: mean difference 6.9 mmHg, P = 0.001; and for mean BP: mean difference 4.2 mmHg, P = 0.003). A similar but statistically insignificant difference was observed in terms of diastolic BP.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that a Western dietary pattern is associated with higher BP in Iranian adolescents. However, additional large-scale prospective studies with adequate methodological quality are required to confirm these findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-015-1090-zDOI Listing
February 2017
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