Publications by authors named "Masayuki Yamazaki"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Weaning from long-term mechanical ventilation utilizing closed-loop ventilation mode (IntelliVent-ASV) in a patient with spinal cord injury.

Spinal Cord Ser Cases 2018 19;4:51. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Ward for Patients with Neurological Disabilities, Tsurumaki-onsen Hospital, 1-16-1 Tsurumaki-kita, Hadano-shi, Kanagawa 257-0001 Japan.

Introduction: Cervical spinal cord injury with the C3 neurological level may cause respiratory failure and require long-term mechanical ventilation. Conventional weaning of spontaneous breathing trials is difficult to perform outside of intensive care or spinal cord units.

Case Presentation: An 80-year-old man presented with total tetraplegia and restrictive respiratory failure that required assisted ventilation after a falling accident. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging showed cervical cord compression that was worst at the C3-C4 intervertebral level. He experienced unexpected cardiac arrest during the conventional weaning process of trials of intermittent spontaneous breathing in the intensive care unit. The automated weaning protocol utilizing a closed-loop ventilation mode (IntelliVent-ASV ) was introduced 131 days after injury in our ward for chronically ill patients. The patient was successfully weaned 39 days after the introduction of the weaning protocol.

Discussion: An automated weaning protocol utilizing a closed-loop ventilation mode could be an optional procedure in patients with cervical cord injury on long-term mechanical ventilation, even in a ward for chronically ill patients where sufficient staff is not available. The efficacy and safety, and the cost-effectiveness of the procedure should be examined in larger spinal cord units.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41394-018-0082-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6008297PMC
June 2018

Iron-Catalyzed Dehydration of Aldoximes to Nitriles Requiring Neither Other Reagents Nor Nitrile Media.

Chem Asian J 2016 05 30;11(9):1348-52. Epub 2016 Mar 30.

Department of Material Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ryukoku University, Seta, Otsu, Shiga, 520-2194, Japan.

The dehydration of aldoximes is an environmentally benign reaction affording the desired nitrile and water as a by-product. However, most of the reported catalytic dehydration reactions of aldoximes require a solvent containing nitrile to synthesize the corresponding nitrile compounds. Inspired by recent reports on the enzymatic synthesis under nitrile-free conditions, we here describe that a simple iron salt catalyzes the dehydration of aldoximes requiring neither other reagents nor nitrile media. Our method can be applied to the one-pot synthesis of nitiriles from aldehydes.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asia.201600085DOI Listing
May 2016

A rapid detection method using flow cytometry to monitor the risk of Legionella in bath water.

J Microbiol Methods 2011 Jul 2;86(1):25-32. Epub 2011 Apr 2.

Nagasaki Prefectural Institute for Environmental Research and Public Health, 2-1306-11 Ikeda, Omura, Nagasaki 856-0026, Japan.

Legionella species are the causative agents of human legionellosis, and bathing facilities have been identified as the sources of infection in several outbreaks in Japan. Researchers in Japan have recently reported evidence of significant associations between bacterial counts and the occurrence of Legionella in bathing facilities and in a hot tub model. A convenient and quantitative bacterial enumeration method is therefore required as an indicator of Legionella contamination or disinfection to replace existing methods such as time-consuming Legionella culture and expensive Legionella-DNA amplification. In this study, we developed a rapid detection method (RDM) to monitor the risk of Legionella using an automated microbial analyzing device based on flow cytometry techniques to measure the total number of bacteria in water samples within two minutes, by detecting typical patterns of scattered light and fluorescence. We first compared the results of our RDM with plate counting results for five filtered hot spring water samples spiked with three species of bacteria, including Legionella. Inactivation of these samples by chlorine was also assessed by the RDM, a live/dead bacterial fluorescence assay and plate counting. Using the RDM, the lower limit of quantitative bacterial counts in the spiked samples was determined as 3.0×10(3)(3.48log)counts mL(-1). We then used a laboratory model of a hot tub and found that the RDM could monitor the growth curve of naturally occurring heterotrophic bacteria with 1 and 2 days' delayed growth of amoeba and Legionella, respectively, and could also determine the killing curve of these bacteria by chlorination. Finally, samples with ≥3.48 or <3.48log total bacterial counts mL(-1) were tested using the RDM from 149 different hot tubs, and were found to be significantly associated with the positive or negative detection of Legionella with 95% sensitivity and 84% specificity. These findings indicated that the RDM can be used for Legionella control at bathing facilities, especially those where the effectiveness of chlorine is reduced by the presence of Fe(2+), Mn(2+), NH(4)(+), skin debris, and/or biofilms in the water.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mimet.2011.03.012DOI Listing
July 2011