Publications by authors named "Masayuki Teramoto"

5 Publications

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Mild Hypertensive Retinopathy and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: The Suita Study.

J Atheroscler Thromb 2022 Jan 15. Epub 2022 Jan 15.

Department of Cerebrovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center.

Aims: This study aimed to investigate the association of mild hypertensive retinopathy with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk.

Methods: A total of 7,027 residents aged 30-79 years without a history of CVD participated in the annual health checkups and retinal photography assessments. Retinal microvascular abnormalities were graded using the standard protocols and classified according to the Keith-Wagener-Barker classification. Mild hypertensive retinopathy was defined as grades 1 and 2. Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for total CVD and its subtypes according to the presence and absence of mild hypertensive retinopathy.

Results: During a median follow-up of 17 years, 351 incident stroke and 247 coronary heart disease (CHD) cases were diagnosed. After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, mild hypertensive retinopathy was positively associated with risk of CVD (multivariable HR=1.24; 95% CI, 1.04-1.49) and stroke (1.28; 1.01-1.62) but not with risk of CHD (1.19; 0.89-1.58). Generalized arteriolar narrowing and enhanced arteriolar wall reflex were positively associated with CVD risk, the multivariable HR (95% CI) was 1.24 (1.00- 1.54)and 1.33 (1.02-1.74), respectively. Moreover, mild hypertensive retinopathy was positively associated with stroke risk in normotensive participants.

Conclusion: Mild hypertensive retinopathy was positively associated with CVD and stroke risk in the urban Japanese population. Especially, generalized arteriolar narrowing and enhanced arteriolar wall reflex were positively associated with CVD risk. These findings suggested that retinal photography could be helpful for cardiovascular risk stratification in the primary cardiovascular prevention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5551/jat.63317DOI Listing
January 2022

Secondhand Smoke Exposure during Childhood and Cancer Mortality in Adulthood among Never Smokers: the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk.

Am J Epidemiol 2021 Dec 8. Epub 2021 Dec 8.

Department of Preventive Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.

We examined whether secondhand smoke exposure during childhood was associated with cancer mortality in adulthood among never smokers. In the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study, we analyzed data from 45,722 Japanese lifetime non-smokers who were aged 40-79 years with no history of cancer at the baseline (1988-1990) and completed a lifestyle questionnaire including the number of family members who smoked at home during their childhood (0/1/2/3+ members). The Cox proportional hazards model and competing risk regression were used to calculate the multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and subdistribution hazard ratios (SHRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of all and site-specific cancer mortality, according to the number of smoking family members during the participant's childhood after adjusting for potential confounding factors. During the median follow-up of 19.2 years, a total of 2,356 deaths from cancer were documented. Secondhand smoke exposure was positively associated with the risk of mortality from pancreatic cancer in adulthood; the multivariable HR of 3+ smoking family members was 2.32 (95% CI: 1.14, 4.72), compared with 0 members. The associations were not evident for the risks of total or other types of smoking-related cancers. In conclusion, secondhand smoke exposure during childhood was associated with an increased risk of mortality from pancreatic cancer in adulthood.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwab284DOI Listing
December 2021

Developing a Stroke Risk Prediction Model Using Cardiovascular Risk Factors: The Suita Study.

Cerebrovasc Dis 2021 Nov 29:1-8. Epub 2021 Nov 29.

Division of Cerebrovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Japan.

Introduction: Stroke remains a major cause of death and disability in Japan and worldwide. Detecting individuals at high risk for stroke to apply preventive approaches is recommended. This study aimed to develop a stroke risk prediction model among urban Japanese using cardiovascular risk factors.

Methods: We followed 6,641 participants aged 30-79 years with neither a history of stroke nor coronary heart disease. The Cox proportional hazard model estimated the risk of stroke incidence adjusted for potential confounders at the baseline survey. The model's performance was assessed using the receiver operating characteristic curve and the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistics. The internal validity of the risk model was tested using derivation and validation samples. Regression coefficients were used for score calculation.

Results: During a median follow-up duration of 17.1 years, 372 participants developed stroke. A risk model including older age, current smoking, increased blood pressure, impaired fasting blood glucose and diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and atrial fibrillation predicted stroke incidence with an area under the curve = 0.76 and p value of the goodness of fit = 0.21. This risk model was shown to be internally valid (p value of the goodness of fit in the validation sample = 0.64). On a risk score from 0 to 26, the incidence of stroke for the categories 0-5, 6-7, 8-9, 10-11, 12-13, 14-15, and 16-26 was 1.1%, 2.1%, 5.4%, 8.2%, 9.0%, 13.5%, and 18.6%, respectively.

Conclusion: We developed a new stroke risk model for the urban general population in Japan. Further research to determine the clinical practicality of this model is required.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000520100DOI Listing
November 2021

Weight Change Since Age 20 and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Mortality: A Prospective Cohort Study.

J Atheroscler Thromb 2021 Nov 20. Epub 2021 Nov 20.

Division of Cerebrovascular Medicine, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center.

Aim: Weight change could have many health outcomes. This study aimed to investigate the association between weight change and mortality risk due to total cardiovascular disease (CVD), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and stroke among Japanese.

Methods: We used Suita Study data from 4,746 people aged 30-79 years in this prospective cohort study. Weight change was defined as the difference between baseline weight and weight at age 20. We used Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of total CVD, IHD, and stroke mortality for 1) participants with a weight change (>10, 5 to 10, -5 to -10, and <-10 kg) compared to those with stable weight (-4.9 to 4.9 kg) and 2) participants who moved from one body mass index category (underweight, normal weight, or overweight) to another compared to those with normal weight at age 20 and baseline.

Results: Within a median follow-up period of 19.9 years, the numbers of total CVD, IHD, and stroke mortality were 268, 132, and 79, respectively. Weight loss of >10 kg was associated with the increased risk of total CVD mortality 2.07 (1.29, 3.32) and stroke mortality 3.02 (1.40, 6.52). Moving from normal weight at age 20 to underweight at baseline was associated with the increased risk of total CVD, IHD, and stroke mortality: 1.76 (1.12, 2.77), 2.10 (1.13, 3.92), and 2.25 (1.05, 4.83), respectively.

Conclusion: Weight loss, especially when moving from normal to underweight, was associated with the increased risk of CVD mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5551/jat.63191DOI Listing
November 2021

Green Tea and Coffee Consumption and All-Cause Mortality Among Persons With and Without Stroke or Myocardial Infarction.

Stroke 2021 03 4;52(3):957-965. Epub 2021 Feb 4.

Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan (M.T., I.M., H.I.).

Background And Purpose: The effect of green tea and coffee consumption on mortality among cardiovascular diseases survivors is unknown. We examined the association between green tea and coffee consumption and mortality among persons with and without stroke or myocardial infarction (MI).

Methods: In the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study, 46 213 participants (478 stroke survivors, 1214 MI survivors, and 44 521 persons without a history of stroke or MI), aged 40 to 79 years at baseline (1988-1990), completed a lifestyle, diet, and medical history questionnaire and were followed up regarding mortality until 2009. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to calculate the multivariable hazard ratios with 95% CIs of all-cause mortality after adjusting for potential confounding factors.

Results: During the 18.5-year median follow-up period, 9253 cases were documented. Green tea consumption was inversely associated with all-cause mortality among stroke or MI survivors; the multivariable hazard ratios (95% CIs) for stroke survivors were 0.73 (0.42-1.27) for 1 to 6 cups/wk, 0.65 (0.36-1.15) for 1 to 2 cups/d, 0.56 (0.34-0.92) for 3 to 4 cups/d, 0.52 (0.31-0.86) for 5 to 6 cups/d, and 0.38 (0.20-0.71) for ≥7 cups/d, compared with nondrinkers. A similar inverse association was observed for MI survivors, but not evident for those without a history of stroke or MI. Coffee consumption was inversely associated with all-cause mortality in persons without a history of stroke or MI; the multivariable hazard ratios (95% CIs) were 0.86 (0.82-0.91) for 1 to 6 cups/wk, 0.86 (0.80-0.92) for 1 cup/d, and 0.82 (0.77-0.89) for ≥2 cups/d, compared with nondrinkers. The corresponding hazard ratios (95% CIs) for MI survivors were 0.69 (0.53-0.91), 0.78 (0.55-1.10), and 0.61 (0.41-0.90). No such association was observed for stroke survivors.

Conclusions: Green tea consumption can be beneficial in improving the prognosis for stroke or MI survivors, whereas coffee consumption can also be so for persons without a history of stroke or MI as well as MI survivors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.120.032273DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7903984PMC
March 2021
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