Publications by authors named "Masayasu Ohta"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prenatal clinical manifestations in individuals with variants.

J Med Genet 2020 Jul 30. Epub 2020 Jul 30.

Department of Pediatric Neurology, Bobath Memorial Hospital, Osaka, Osaka, Japan.

Background: Variants in the type IV collagen gene () cause early-onset cerebrovascular diseases. Most individuals are diagnosed postnatally, and the prenatal features of individuals with variants remain unclear.

Methods: We examined in 218 individuals with suspected /2-related brain defects. Among those arising from variants, we focused on individuals showing prenatal abnormal ultrasound findings and validated their prenatal and postnatal clinical features in detail.

Results: Pathogenic variants were detected in 56 individuals (n=56/218, 25.7%) showing porencephaly (n=29), schizencephaly (n=12) and others (n=15). Thirty-four variants occurred de novo (n=34/56, 60.7%). Foetal information was available in 47 of 56 individuals, 32 of whom (n=32/47, 68.1%) had one or more foetal abnormalities. The median gestational age at the detection of initial prenatal abnormal features was 31 weeks of gestation. Only 14 individuals had specific prenatal findings that were strongly suggestive of features associated with variants. Foetal ventriculomegaly was the most common initial feature (n=20/32, 62.5%). Posterior fossa abnormalities, including Dandy-Walker malformation, were observed prenatally in four individuals. Regarding extrabrain features, foetal growth restriction was present in 16 individuals, including eight individuals with comorbid ventriculomegaly.

Conclusions: Prenatal observation of ventriculomegaly with comorbid foetal growth restriction should prompt a thorough ultrasound examination and gene testing should be considered when pathogenic variants are strongly suspected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jmedgenet-2020-106896DOI Listing
July 2020

Thermolabile polymorphism of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2: A genetic risk factor of overall acute encephalopathy.

Brain Dev 2019 Nov 24;41(10):862-869. Epub 2019 Jul 24.

Department of Developmental Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Objectives: Acute encephalopathy is an acute brain dysfunction after preceding infection, consisting of multiple syndromes. Some syndromes, such as acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD), are severe with poor outcome, whereas others, such as clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with reversible splenial lesion (MERS), are mild with favorable outcome. Previous study reported the association of the thermolabile polymorphism in Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2) gene and severe syndromes of acute encephalopathy. To further explore the pathogenetic role of CPT2 in acute encephalopathy, we conducted a case-control association study of a typical thermolabile CPT2 polymorphism, rs2229291, in 416 patients of acute encephalopathy, including both severe and mild syndromes.

Methods: The case cohort consisted of 416 patients, including AESD, MERS, and other syndromes. The control subjects were 100 healthy Japanese. rs2229291 was genotyped by Sanger sequencing. Genetic distribution was compared between the patients and controls using Cochran-Armitage trend test.

Results: Minor allele frequency of rs2229291 was significantly higher in AESD (p = 0.044), MERS (p = 0.015) and entire acute encephalopathy (p = 0.044) compared to the controls. The polymorphism showed no significant association with influenza virus, or with outcome.

Conclusions: This study provided evidence that CPT2 is a susceptibility gene for overall acute encephalopathy, including both severe and mild syndromes, and suggested that impairment of mitochondrial metabolism is common to various syndromes of acute encephalopathy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.braindev.2019.07.008DOI Listing
November 2019

Comprehensive analysis of coding variants highlights genetic complexity in developmental and epileptic encephalopathy.

Nat Commun 2019 06 7;10(1):2506. Epub 2019 Jun 7.

Department of Human Genetics, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama, 236-0004, Japan.

Although there are many known Mendelian genes linked to epileptic or developmental and epileptic encephalopathy (EE/DEE), its genetic architecture is not fully explained. Here, we address this incompleteness by analyzing exomes of 743 EE/DEE cases and 2366 controls. We observe that damaging ultra-rare variants (dURVs) unique to an individual are significantly overrepresented in EE/DEE, both in known EE/DEE genes and the other non-EE/DEE genes. Importantly, enrichment of dURVs in non-EE/DEE genes is significant, even in the subset of cases with diagnostic dURVs (P = 0.000215), suggesting oligogenic contribution of non-EE/DEE gene dURVs. Gene-based analysis identifies exome-wide significant (P = 2.04 × 10) enrichment of damaging de novo mutations in NF1, a gene primarily linked to neurofibromatosis, in infantile spasm. Together with accumulating evidence for roles of oligogenic or modifier variants in severe neurodevelopmental disorders, our results highlight genetic complexity in EE/DEE, and indicate that EE/DEE is not an aggregate of simple Mendelian disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10482-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6555845PMC
June 2019

mutations cause variable phenotypes of developmental and epileptic encephalopathy.

Epilepsia Open 2018 Dec 1;3(4):495-502. Epub 2018 Nov 1.

Department of Pediatrics Showa University School of Medicine Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo Japan.

Objective: Vitamin B-dependent epilepsies are treatable disorders caused by variants in several genes, such as ,, and others. Recently, biallelic variants in formerly known as , were identified as a novel cause of vitamin B-dependent epilepsies. Our objective was to further delineate the phenotype of mutation.

Methods: We identified 4 unrelated patients harboring a total of 4 variants in , including 3 novel variants, in a cohort of 700 patients with developmental and epileptic encephalopathies. Clinical information in each case was collected.

Results: Each patient had a different clinical course of epilepsy, with seizure onset from the first day of life to 3 months of age. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures were commonly noted. Myoclonic seizures or focal seizures were also observed in 2 patients. Interictal electroencephalography showed variable findings, such as suppression burst, focal or multifocal discharges, and diffuse slow activity. Unlike previous reports, all the patients had some degree of intellectual disability, although some of them had received early treatment with vitamin B, suggesting that different mutation types influence the severity and outcome of the seizures.

Significance: variants should be regarded as among the causative genes of developmental and epileptic encephalopathy, even when it occurs after the neonatal period. Early diagnosis and proper treatment with pyridoxine or pyridoxal phosphate is essential to improve the neurologic prognosis in neonates or young children with poorly controlled seizures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/epi4.12272DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6276781PMC
December 2018

Anti-signal recognition particle myopathy in the first decade of life.

Pediatr Neurol 2011 Aug;45(2):114-6

Department of Neurology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Autoantibodies to signal recognition particle have been associated with juvenile and adult-onset necrotizing myopathy. However, only a few teenage patients with anti-signal recognition particle myopathy have been reported, and to date, to our knowledge, no patient younger than 10 years has been documented. We describe 2 Japanese girls with anti-signal recognition particle myopathy who developed symptoms from the ages of 5 and 9 years, respectively. Both patients had progressive muscle weakness and atrophy without myalgia. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy was initially suspected because of asymmetric shoulder girdle muscle involvement in one patient, and limb girdle muscular dystrophy due to proximal limb muscle weakness in the other. There were no extramuscular manifestations, including fever or arthritis. Serum creatine kinase levels were elevated to 2,467-4,629 IU/L. Results of muscle biopsy revealed necrotizing myopathy with minimal to mild endomysial fibrosis but without inflammatory infiltrates. Immunosuppressive agents were not effective for muscle weakness, resulting in marked disability. Anti-signal recognition particle myopathy can occur in the first decade of life and should be included in the differential diagnosis for children with progressive limb girdle muscle weakness and high creatine kinase levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2011.04.009DOI Listing
August 2011

Frameshift mutations of the ARX gene in familial Ohtahara syndrome.

Epilepsia 2010 Sep;51(9):1679-84

Department of Pediatrics, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Iida-nishi, Yamagata, Japan.

Purpose: Ohtahara syndrome is one of the most severe and earliest forms of epilepsy and is frequently associated with brain malformations, such as hemimegalencephaly. Recently, longer expansion of the first polyalanine tract of ARX was found to be causative for Ohtahara syndrome without brain malformation, whereas premature termination mutations of ARX were found to cause severe brain malformations, such as lissencephaly or hydranencephaly. Both are designated as ARX-related interneuronopathies.

Methods: We investigated the molecular basis of Ohtahara syndrome in two families, comprising six male patients in two generations demonstrating X-linked inheritance.

Results: Novel frameshift mutations in the terminal exon of the ARX gene (Ala524fsX534 and E536fsX672) were identified in two patients (2 and 13 years, each) from both families. Two patients developed West syndrome, and one of these later developed Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of all patients showed no brain malformations in contrast to the patients with a premature termination mutation in other exons of ARX.

Discussion: The etiology of Ohtahara syndrome is heterogeneous; however, the molecular analysis of ARX should be considered in sporadic or familial male patients with Ohtahara syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1528-1167.2010.02559.xDOI Listing
September 2010

A boy with "transient" growth hormone deficiency in prepubertal stage despite normal growth hormone secretion in childhood and after puberty.

Endocr J 2007 Dec 14;54(6):1015-9. Epub 2007 Nov 14.

Department of Pediatrics Development Biology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.

Transient growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is occasionally found in prepubertal individuals, and this phenomenon has been variously interpreted. Sex steroids enhance GH secretion; however, the cut-off values of provocative GH tests are not modified according to the physiological changes. Physiological changes in sex steroid levels are thought to cause the image of transient GHD. In addition, the reproducibility of provocative GH tests makes the interpretation complicated. We experienced a case of a boy with short stature who had undergone provocative GH tests at three different times: childhood (5 and 7 years old), before puberty (12 years old), and in adolescence (15 years old). Although the responses of GH in his childhood and adolescence were within the normal range, his prepubertal GH response was extremely low, as if he had "complete" GHD (peak GH: insulin test, 0.60 ng/ml; clonidine test, 0.78 ng/ml). No morphological changes were observed in the pituitary gland or hypothalamus on MRI. The level of insulin-like growth factor 1 was in the normal range for his age at this time. Here, we report the clinical course and endocrinological data of this case, and suggest that transient GHD is caused not only by the physiological effects of sex steroids but also by certain mechanisms that actively reduce GH secretion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1507/endocrj.k07-068DOI Listing
December 2007

Failure to find causal mutations in the GABA(A)-receptor gamma2 subunit (GABRG2) gene in Japanese febrile seizure patients.

Neurosci Lett 2003 Jun;343(2):117-20

Department of Medical Genetics, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki-ken, 305-8575, Japan.

Recently, mutations in the GABA(A)-receptor gamma2 subunit (GABRG2) gene were identified in two families with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and two families with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and febrile seizures (FS). We tested the hypothesis that genetic variations in the GABRG2 gene confer susceptibility to FS in the Japanese population. We performed a systematic search for mutations in 94 unrelated Japanese patients with FS and detected six variants (-158C>T, 315C>T, 588T>C, IVS5-55C>T, IVS7+20G>A, and IVS7-141T>A). No non-synonymous mutation was detected. We genotyped three exonic polymorphisms and performed a case control study and a transmission disequilibrium test using 55 independent complete trios with FS and 106 control subjects. None of these polymorphic alleles were significantly associated with FS. Our results indicate that genomic variations of GABRG2 are not likely to be substantially involved in the etiology of FS in the Japanese population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0304-3940(03)00338-0DOI Listing
June 2003

Failure to find evidence for association between voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN2A variants and febrile seizures in humans.

Neurosci Lett 2002 Aug;329(2):249-51

Department of Medical Genetics, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki-ken 305-8575, Japan.

The voltage-gated sodium channel type II alpha polypeptide gene (SCN2A) R188W mutation with channel dysfunction was recently identified in a patient with febrile and afebrile seizures. A possible association between SCN2A R19K polymorphism and febrile seizures (FS) associated with afebrile seizures including generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) was also noted. We attempted to identify the R188W mutation and confirm association of the R19K polymorphism in 93 Japanese patients with FS, 35 Japanese patients with FS associated with afebrile seizures including GEFS+, and 100 control subjects. The R188W mutation was not found. There were no significant differences in genotype or allele frequencies of the R19K polymorphism between groups. Our study failed to provide evidence supporting a causal relation between the SCN2A mutation/polymorphism and FS or FS associated with afebrile seizures including GEFS+ in the Japanese population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0304-3940(02)00651-1DOI Listing
August 2002