Publications by authors named "Marzia Arlotti"

15 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Anorganic bovine bone (Bio-Oss) regulates miRNA of osteoblast-like cells.

Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent 2010 Feb;30(1):83-7

Institute of Histology, University of Bologna and Center of Molecular Genetics, CARISBO Foundation, Bologna, Italy.

Bio-Oss (Geistlich) is composed of an organic bovine bone and has been widely used in several bone regeneration procedures during oral surgery. However, how this biomaterial enhances osteoblast activity to promote bone formation is not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small, functional, noncoding RNAs of 19 to 23 nucleotides that regulate the transcription of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in proteins. In this study, the miRNA microarray technique was used to investigate translation regulation in an osteoblast-like cell line (MG63) exposed to Bio-Oss. Nine up-regulated miRNAs (mir-423, mir-492, mir-191, mir-23a, mir-377, mir-494, mir-214, mir-193b, mir-320) and 4 down-regulated miRNAs (mir-27a, mir-24, mir-188, let-7c) were identified. Because each miRNA regulates 100 mRNAs, only mRNAs related to bone formation were analyzed. The vast majority of detected mRNAs are down-regulated, including some homeobox genes (genes that regulate the morphogenesis of an entire segment of the body), such as noggin and EN1. An indirect positive effect was demonstrated on bone morphogenetic protein-4. To the authors' knowledge, the data reported here are the first on translation regulation in osteoblasts exposed to Bio-Oss. This study may be relevant in better understanding the molecular mechanism of bone regeneration and used as a potential tool for analyzing the combined use of cytokines.
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February 2010

Genes causing clefting syndromes as candidates for non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate: a family-based association study.

Eur J Oral Sci 2008 Dec;116(6):507-11

Department of Histology, Embryology and Applied Biology, Centre of Molecular Genetics, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Clefts of the orofacial region are among the most common congenital defects, caused by abnormal facial development during gestation. Non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP) is a complex trait most probably caused by multiple interacting loci, with possible additional environmental factors. As facial clefts form part of more than 300 syndromes, one strategy for identifying the genetic causes of NSCLP could be to study candidate genes responsible for clefting syndromes. Three genes were selected for this investigation: TP63, which codes for the tumour protein p63 and causes Ectrodactyly-Ectodermal dysplasia-orofacial Cleft syndrome; JAG2, a downstream gene of TP63; and MID1, which is responsible for Opitz syndrome. A linkage disequilibrium investigation was performed with intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms on each of these genes in a sample study of 239 patients/parents trios. Evidence which suggests that JAG2 and MID1 may play a role in NSCLP was obtained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0722.2008.00574.xDOI Listing
December 2008

Anorganic bovine bone and a silicate-based synthetic bone activate different microRNAs.

J Oral Sci 2008 Sep;50(3):301-7

Department of Histology, Embryology and Applied Biology, University of Bologna and Center of Molecular Genetics, CARISBO Foundation, Bologna, Italy.

Bio-Oss (BO), composed of anorganic bovine bone, is widely used in several bone regeneration procedures in oral surgery. PerioGlas (PG) is an alloplastic material that has been used for grafting of periodontal osseous defects since the 1990s. However, how these biomaterials alter osteoblast activity to promote bone formation is poorly understood. We attempted to address this question by using microRNA microarray techniques to investigate differences in translational regulation in osteoblasts exposed to BO and PG. By using miRNA microarrays containing 329 probes designed from human miRNA sequences, we investigated miRNAs whose expression was significantly modified in an osteoblast-like cell line (MG-63) cultured with BO vs PG. Three up-regulated miRNAs (mir-337, mir-200b, mir-377) and 4 down-regulated miRNAs (mir-130a, mir-214, mir-27a, mir-93) were identified. Our results indicated that BO and PG act on different miRNAs. Globally, PG causes activation of bone-forming signaling, whereas BO also activates cartilage-related pathways.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2334/josnusd.50.301DOI Listing
September 2008

Titanium acts on osteoblast translational process.

J Oral Implantol 2008 ;34(4):190-5

Institute of Histology, University of Bologna and Center of Molecular Genetics, Cassa di Risparmio di Bologna Foundation, Bologna, Italy.

Titanium is a highly biocompatible material and very osteogenic in vivo. However, how titanium regulates osteoblast activity to promote bone formation is incompletely characterized. We, therefore, attempted to get more information by using microRNA (miRNA) microarray techniques to investigate translation regulation in osteoblasts grown on titanium disks. The miRNA oligonucleotide microarray provides a novel method to carry out genome-wide miRNA profiling in human samples. By using miRNA microarrays containing 329 probes designed from the human miRNA sequence, several miRNA were identified in osteoblast-like cell line (MG 63) grown on titanium disks. There were 13 upregulated miRNAs (ie, mir-23a, mir-222, mir-523, mir-22, mir-23b, mir-143, mir-377, mir-24, mir-422b, mir-26a, mir-29a, mir-17-5p, mir-182) and 2 down-regulated miRNAs (ie, mir-187, mir-339). The data reported are, to our knowledge, the first study on translation regulation in osteoblasts exposed to titanium. The data can be relevant to understand better the molecular mechanism of osteoblast activation and as a model for comparing other materials with similar clinical effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1563/0.869.1DOI Listing
November 2008

PerioGlas regulates osteoblast RNA interfering.

J Prosthodont 2008 Oct 20;17(7):522-6. Epub 2008 Jun 20.

Institute of Histology, University of Bologna and Center of Molecular Genetics, CARISBO Foundation, Bologna, Italy.

Purpose: PerioGlas (PG) is an alloplastic material that has been used for grafting periodontal osseous defects since the 1990s. In animal models, it has been proven that PG achieves histologically good repairs of surgically created defects. In clinical trials, PG is effective as an adjunct to conventional surgery in the treatment of intrabony defects; however, how PG alters osteoblast activity to promote bone formation is poorly understood. We therefore attempted to address this question by using microRNA (miRNA) microarray techniques to investigate the translation process in osteoblasts exposed to PG.

Materials And Methods: By using miRNA microarrays containing 329 probes designed from human miRNA sequences, we identified several miRNA whose expression was significantly modified in osteoblast-like cell lines (MG-63) cultured with PG.

Results: There were ten up-regulated miRNA (mir-337, mir-377, mir-9, mir-516, mir-515-3p, mir-496, mir-200b, mir-489, mir-25, mir-423) and two down-regulated miRNA (mir-26a, mir-30d).

Conclusion: PG acts on miRNAs, which in turn regulate several messengers. Among them there are mRNAs related to bone formation and skeletal and cartilage development. The vast majority of detected genes are down-regulated, and some are homeobox genes like NOG, EN1, and CHRD. Other down-regulated genes are receptors (like GHRHR) and extracellular matrix proteins (like COMP). Although the exact mechanism of PG action on osteoblasts is still incompletely understood, these data demonstrate that PG has not only an osteoconductive effect, but also regulates bone formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-849X.2008.00331.xDOI Listing
October 2008

Investigation of MYH14 as a candidate gene in cleft lip with or without cleft palate.

Eur J Oral Sci 2008 Jun;116(3):287-90

Department of Histology, Embryology and Applied Biology, Centre of Molecular Genetics CARISBO Foundation, University of Bologna, Via Belmeloro, Bologna, Italy.

Clefts of the orofacial region are among the most common facial defects and are caused by abnormal facial development during gestation. Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) is a birth defect with a complex etiology resulting from a mixture of genetic and environmental factors. In the present study we considered myosin 14 (MYH14) as a candidate gene for CL/P. This gene codes for the heavy chain of non-muscle myosin IIC (NMMHC-IIC), maps in the OFC3 region, and shares significant homology with myosin 9, a gene that our group has recently seen to be involved in CL/P. A linkage disequilibrium investigation was conducted with six single nucleotide polymorphisms in MYH14 and a sample of 239 CL/P nonsyndromic patients and their parents. Our family-based investigation provided no evidence of association between MYH14 and CL/P alleles. These data do not support the involvement of MYH14 in CL/P among the Italian population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0722.2008.00534.xDOI Listing
June 2008

Medpor regulates osteoblast's microRNAs.

Biomed Mater Eng 2008 ;18(2):91-7

Institute of Histology, University of Bologna and Center of Molecular Genetics, CARISBO Foundation, Bologna, Italy.

Porous polyethylene (PP or Medpor) is an alloplastic material worldwide used for craniofacial reconstruction. Although several clinical studies are available, there is a lack as regard the genetic effects. Because PP is always fixed on bone and the mechanism by which PP acts on osteoblasts is unknown, we therefore attempted to address this question by using microRNA microarray techniques to investigate the translation regulation in osteoblasts exposed to PP. The miRNA oligonucleotide microarray provides a novel method to carry out genome-wide microRNA profiling in human samples. By using miRNA microarrays containing 329 probe designed from Human miRNA sequence, we identified in osteoblast-like cells line (MG-63) cultured with Medpor (Porex Corporation, Fairburn, Georgia, USA) several miRNA which expression is significantly modified. We identified 16 up-regulated miRNA (i.e. mir-337, mir-515-3p, mir-377, mir-153, mir-367, mir-152, let-7b, mir-92, mir-155, mir-424, mir-148b, mir-368, mir-18b, mir-520d, mir-20b, mir-128a) and 2 down-regulated miRNA (i.e. mir-143, mir-32). The data reported are, to our knowledge, the first study on translation regulation in osteoblasts exposed to PP. They can be relevant to better understand the molecular mechanism of bone regeneration and as a model for comparing other materials with similar clinical effects.
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July 2008

Comparison between osteoblasts derived from human dental pulp stem cells and osteosarcoma cell lines.

Cell Biol Int 2008 Jul 4;32(7):733-8. Epub 2008 Mar 4.

Centre of Molecular Genetics, CARISBO Foundation, Institute of Histology and General Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Stem cells derived from human dental pulp are able to differentiate into osteoblasts and are a potential source of autologous bone. The aim of this study was to compare genes differentially expressed in osteoblastoids from human dental pulp (OHDP) to osteosarcoma cells (OCs). Human dental pulp was extracted and immersed in a digestive solution. Cells were cultured and selected using c-kit, CD34, CD45 and STRO-1 antibodies. In parallel, two OCs (i.e., SAOS2 and TE85) were cultured. RNA was extracted from different populations of cells and cDNA was used for the hybridisation of human 19.2K DNA microarrays. We identified several differences in gene expression between OHDP and OCs. Some down-regulated OHDP genes, such as RUNX1, MAP4K4 and PRDM2, are involved in bone development, cell motility and transcript regulation. Gene expression in OHDP is significantly different from that in OCs, suggesting differences in cell function and activity between these cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cellbi.2008.02.003DOI Listing
July 2008

Anatase nanosurface regulates microRNAs.

J Craniofac Surg 2008 Mar;19(2):328-33

Institute of Histology, University of Bologna and Center of Molecular Genetics, CARISBO Foundation, Bologna, Italy.

Titanium is the criterion standard among materials used for prosthetic devices because of its good mechanical and chemical properties. When exposed to oxygen, titanium becomes an oxide that is biocompatible and able to induce osseointegration. There are 3 allotropic forms of titanium dioxide: brookite, rutile, and anatase. Anatase can be prepared as a colloidal suspension and then used to coat surfaces. Anatase coating (AC) can potentially have specific biologic effects and specifically induce bone formation. To get more information as regards the osteogenic effect of AC, we used microRNA (miRNA) microarray techniques to investigate translation regulation in osteoblasts exposed to AC. Transduction, transcription, and translation are the 3 levels of regulation of cell activity. Recently, a new type of translation regulation has been identified: RNA interference. RNA interference is a process in which miRNA (i.e., noncoding RNAs of 19-23 nucleotides) can induce sequence-specific mRNA degradation and/or translational repression. The human genome encodes a few hundred miRNAs that can posttranscriptionally repress thousands of genes. miRNA oligonucleotide microarray provides a novel method of carrying out genome-wide miRNA profiling in human samples. By using miRNA microarrays containing 329 probes designed from human miRNA sequences, we identified in osteoblast-like cell line (MG-63) cultured with AC several miRNA whose expression had been significantly modified. The data reported constitute, to our knowledge, the first study on translation regulation in osteoblasts exposed to AC. They can be relevant to a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of bone regeneration and as a model for comparing other materials with similar clinical effects.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0b013e3181534ab3DOI Listing
March 2008

Zirconium oxide regulates RNA interfering of osteoblast-like cells.

J Mater Sci Mater Med 2008 Jun 6;19(6):2471-6. Epub 2008 Feb 6.

Institute of Histology, University of Bologna and Center of Molecular Genetics, CARISBO Foundation, Bologna, Italy.

Zirconium oxide (ZO) has outstanding mechanical properties, high biocompatibility and high resistance to scratching. Since dental implants are made with ZO and the genetic effects of ZO on osteoblasts are incompletely understood, we used microRNA microarray techniques to investigate the translation process in osteoblasts exposed to ZO. By using miRNA microarrays containing 329 probes designed from Human miRNA sequences, we identified in osteoblast-like cells line (MG-63) cultured on ZO disks several miRNA whose expression was significantly modified. The most notable regulated genes acting on osteoblasts are: NOG, SHOX, IGF1, BMP1 and FGFR1. The data reported below represent the first study on translation regulation in osteoblasts exposed to zirconium and one in which the effect of ZO on bone formation has been detected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-008-3386-5DOI Listing
June 2008

Short-period effects of zirconia and titanium on osteoblast microRNAs.

Clin Implant Dent Relat Res 2008 Sep 30;10(3):200-5. Epub 2008 Jan 30.

Institute of Histology, University of Bologna and Center of Molecular Genetics, CARISBO Foundation, Bologna, Italy.

Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, functional, noncoding RNAs of 19 to 23 nucleotides which induce degradation of specific messenger RNAs (mRNAs), thus controlling the translational process (ie, synthesis of proteins from mRNAs). In addition, mRNAs regulate the promoter of specific miRNAs activating an autoregulatory feedback loop.

Purpose: Titanium and zirconium dioxide ceramics (ZDCs) are used to make dental implants. Because the molecular mechanism by which ZDC and Ti act on osteoblasts is incompletely understood, we attempted to get more information by comparing the effect of ZDC and Ti on osteoblast miRNAs.

Materials And Methods: By using miRNA microarray technique, we identified in osteoblast-like cell line (MG63) grown on grade 3 Ti and ZDC disks several miRNAs whose expression was modified. We collected mRNAs after 24 hours of cell culturing to better understand molecular events related to early bone healing around inserted implants. An mRNA microarray technique was then performed as a control.

Results: There were six up- and four down-regulated miRNAs. Because every miRNA regulates hundreds of genes, we focused only on those related to bone formation. Among them, the most notable are BMP4 and 7, which are both up-regulated in osteoblasts cultured on Ti disks.

Conclusion: The detected miRNAs differentially expressed in osteoblast-like cells grown on ZDC versus Ti act on a limited number of miRNAs and bone-related genes. The most notable are BMP4 and 7, which are more expressed in osteoblasts exposed to Ti surface. Consequently, we suggest that Ti surfaces could provide some advantages to immediate load implantology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8208.2007.00078.xDOI Listing
September 2008

Genetic portrait of osteoblast-like cells cultured on PerioGlas.

J Oral Implantol 2007 ;33(6):327-33

Department of Embryology and Morphology, University of Ferrara.

PerioGlas (PG) is an alloplastic material used for grafting periodontal osseous defects since 1995. In animal models it has been histologically proven that PG achieves good repair of surgically created defects. In clinical trials, PG has been shown to be effective as an adjunct to conventional surgery in treating intrabony defects. Because the molecular events by which PG is able to alter osteoblast activity to promote bone formation are poorly understood, we investigated genes that are differently regulated in osteoblast-like cells exposed to PG. Bone formation can be attributable to ostegenesis (ie, direct stimulation of osteoblast to produce new bone), osteoconduction (which operates like a scaffold), or both processes. By using DNA microarrays containing 20 000 oligonucleotides, we identified several genes in which expression was significantly downregulated in a MG63 cell line cultured with PerioGlas (US Biomaterials Corp, Alachua, Fla). Specifically, PG is able to downregulate some functional activities of osteoblast-like cells: it acts on signal transduction, especially on the transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) paracrine network; it inhibits apoptosis; it decreases cell adhesion with consequent enhancement of cell mobility and migration; and it acts on bone marrow stem cells (ie, CD34). In conclusion, PG acts on bone formation by determining both osteoconduction (as demonstrated by the reduced cell adhesion) and ostegenesis (as shown by TGFB-related proteins and stem cell markers).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1563/1548-1336(2007)33[327:GPOOCC]2.0.CO;2DOI Listing
March 2008

Differences in osteoblast miRNA induced by cell binding domain of collagen and silicate-based synthetic bone.

J Biomed Sci 2007 Nov 25;14(6):777-82. Epub 2007 Jul 25.

Institute of Histology, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

PerioGlas (PG) is an silicate-based (i.e. anorganic) material used for grafting periodontal osseous defects since the ninety whereas P-15 is an analog of the cell binding domain of collagen (i.e. organic material) that is successfully used in clinical trial to promote bone formation. However, how PG (i.e anorganic material) and P-15 (i.e. collagen) differentially alter osteoblast activity to promote bone formation is unknown. We therefore attempted to get more insight by using microRNA microarray techniques to investigate the translation process in osteoblasts differentially exposed to PG and P-15. We identified 3 up-regulated miRNA (i.e. mir-30b, mir-26a, mir-92) and 8 down-regulated miRNA (i.e. mir-337, mir-377, mir-25, mir-200b, mir-129, mir-373, mir-133b, mir-489). The data reported are, to our knowledge, the first study on translation regulation in osteoblatsts differentially exposed to cell binding domain of collagen and to silicate-based material. Both enhance the translation of several miRNA belonging to osteogenetic genes, but P-15 acts preferentially on homeobox genes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11373-007-9193-zDOI Listing
November 2007

Linkage disequilibrium analysis of two genes mapping on OFC3: PVR and PVRL2.

Eur J Hum Genet 2007 Sep 30;15(9):992-4. Epub 2007 May 30.

Department of Histology, Embryology and Applied Biology, Centre of Molecular Genetics, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Clefts of the lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P) are one of the most common birth defects, occurring in 1/700-1/1,000 infants born alive. The nature of the genetic contribution is still to be clarified; however, some chromosome regions and candidate genes have been proposed for this malformation. Recently, a couple of genes, PVR and PVRL2, mapping in the candidate region OFC3 on chromosome 19q13.31, have been investigated because of their homology to PVRL1, a gene previously shown to cause the Margarita Island CL/P-ectodermal dysplasia syndrome. In the present work, we investigated PVR and PVRL2 genes by family-based linkage disequilibrium analysis using a sample collected from the Italian population. In contrast to previous analyses on other populations, we could not find any statistically significant association between the markers alleles and non-syndromic clefting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201868DOI Listing
September 2007

Genetic effects of Medpor on osteoblast-like cells.

J Craniofac Surg 2006 Nov;17(6):1243-50

Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.

Porous polyethylene (PP or Medpor) is an alloplastic material used worldwide for craniofacial reconstruction. Although several clinical studies are available, there is a lack as regard the genetic effects. Because PP is always fixed on bone and the mechanism by which PP acts on osteoblasts is unknown, we therefore attempted to address this question by using microarray techniques to identify genes that are differently regulated in osteoblasts exposed to PP. By using DNA microarrays containing 19,200 genes, we identified in osteoblast-like cell lines (i.e. MG-63) cultured on PP several genes where expression was differentially regulated. The differentially expressed genes cover a broad range of functional activities: 1) signal transduction, 2) transcription, 3) translation, 4) cell cycle regulation, 5) vesicular transport, and 6) production of cytoskeletal elements, cell-adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. The data reported are, to our knowledge, the first genetic portrait of osteoblast-like cells cultured on PP. They are relevant to better understanding of the molecular mechanism of bone-PP interaction and as a model for comparing other materials used for bone reconstruction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.scs.0000248644.02718.28DOI Listing
November 2006