Maryam Hashemian, MD, PhD - National Cancer Institue - Postdoctoral Fellow

Maryam Hashemian

MD, PhD

National Cancer Institue

Postdoctoral Fellow

Rockville , MD | United States

Main Specialties: Epidemiology, Public Health

Additional Specialties: Nutritional Epidemiology

ORCID logohttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-9702-9752


Top Author

Maryam Hashemian, MD, PhD - National Cancer Institue - Postdoctoral Fellow

Maryam Hashemian

MD, PhD

Introduction

Maryam Hashemian, M.D., Ph.D., is a post-doctoral fellow in National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NCI/NIH). She earned an MD. from the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran in 2002. She joined Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Iran, in 2002 as a physician and started her research there in 2009. She received a Ph.D. in Nutrition from the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Iran in 2015. Maryam joined the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, NCI, NIH as a visiting fellow in August 2016.
Dr. Hashemian’s current work includes studies of the role of food and nutrients in cancer risk. She is examining dietary scores, micronutrient intake estimates, and the use of biomarker measurements in serum, hair, nails, and urine to investigate the relationship between diet and cancer. She is a member of the American Society of Nutrition.

Primary Affiliation: National Cancer Institue - Rockville , MD , United States

Specialties:

Additional Specialties:

Research Interests:

Education

Jan 2012 - Jun 2015
Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences
PhD
Jan 1994 - Jan 2002
Mashhad University of Medical Sciences
MD

Experience

Jun 2018
Elevator pitch
Finalist
Nutrition 2018, Boston, MA
Aug 2016
Visiting Fellowship Award

National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
Jan 2016
Scholarship

National Elites Foundation, Tehran, Iran
Jun 2015
Best PhD Student Award

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Dec 2012
Health Promotion Award
Principal Investigator
Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran

Publications

13Publications

1122Reads

332Profile Views

38PubMed Central Citations

Individual and Combined Effects of Environmental Risk Factors for Esophageal Cancer Based on Results From the Golestan Cohort Study.

Gastroenterology 2019 Jan 3. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Digestive Disease Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

Background & Aims: Northeast Iran has one of the highest reported rates of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) worldwide. Decades of investigations in this region have identified some local habits and environmental exposures that increase risk. We analyzed data from the Golestan Cohort Study to determine the individual and combined effects of the major environmental risk factors of ESCC.

Methods: We performed a population-based cohort of 50,045 individuals, 40 to 75 years old, from urban and rural areas across Northeast Iran. Detailed data on demographics, diet, lifestyle, socioeconomic status, temperature of drinking beverages, and different exposures were collected using validated methods, questionnaires, and physical examinations, from 2004 through 2008. Participants were followed from the date of enrollment to the date of first diagnosis of esophageal cancer, date of death from other causes, or date of last follow-up, through December 31, 2017. Proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between different exposures and ESCC.

Results: During an average 10 years of follow-up, 317 participants developed ESCC. Opium smoking (HR 1.85; 95% CI 1.18-2.90), drinking hot tea (?60°C) (HR 1.60; 95% CI 1.15-2.22), low intake of fruits (HR 1.48; 95% CI 1.07-2.05) and vegetables (HR 1.62; 95% CI 1.03-2.56), excessive tooth loss (HR 1.66; 95% CI 1.04-2.64), drinking unpiped water (HR 2.04; 95% CI 1.09-3.81), and exposure to indoor air pollution (HR 1.57; 95% CI 1.08-2.29) were significantly associated with increased risk of ESCC, in a dose-dependent manner. Combined exposure to these risk factors was associated with a stepwise increase in the risk of developing ESCC, reaching a more than 7-fold increase in risk in the highest category. Approximately 75% of the ESCC cases in this region can be attributed to a combination of the identified exposures.

Conclusions: Analysis of data from the Golestan Cohort Study in Iran identified multiple risk factors for ESCC in this population. Our findings support the hypothesis that the high rates of ESCC are due to a combination of factors, including thermal injury (from hot tea), exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (from opium and indoor air pollution), and nutrient-deficient diets. We also associated ESCC risk with exposure to unpiped water and tooth loss.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00165085183543
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2018.12.024DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads
16.716 Impact Factor

Daily Consumption of Synbiotic Yogurt Decreases Liver Steatosis in Patients with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

J Nutr 2018 Aug;148(8):1276-1284

Department of Nutrition, Food and Beverages Safety Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran.

Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in developed and developing countries. The use of synbiotics has been proposed as a probable management strategy for patients with NAFLD.

Objective: We investigated the effects of synbiotic yogurt on hepatic steatosis and liver enzymes as primary outcomes and on oxidative stress markers, adipokine concentration, and gut peptide concentration as secondary outcomes in patients with NAFLD.

Methods: In this 24-wk, open-label, randomized controlled clinical trial, 102 patients [50 men and 52 women; mean age: 40 y; body mass index (in kg/m2) (mean ± SD): 31.2 ± 4.9] were randomly assigned to 3 groups, including 2 intervention groups and 1 control group. The intervention groups consumed 300 g synbiotic yogurt containing 108 colony-forming units Bifidobacterium animalis/mL and 1.5 g inulin or conventional yogurt daily and were advised to follow a healthy lifestyle (i.e., diet and exercise). The control group was advised to follow a healthy lifestyle alone. We evaluated differences between groups in liver function measures by using repeated-measures ANOVA, ANCOVA, and logistic regression.

Results: At the end of the study, the grades of NAFLD, as determined by ultrasonography, showed a significant decrease in the synbiotic group compared with the conventional and control groups (P < 0.001). The following significant mean ± SD decreases were seen in the synbiotic, conventional, and control groups, respectively: serum concentration of alanine aminotransferase (-14.5 ± 15.6 compared with 4.6 ± 15.4 and 3.1 ± 14.4 IU/L; P = 0.008), aspartate aminotransferase (-7.5 ± 6.1 compared with 3.0 ± 8.2 and 3.1 ± 5.7 IU/L; P < 0.001), alkaline phosphatase (-26.2 ± 16.8 compared with 3.4 ± 30.1 and 1.5 ± 31.9 IU/L; P = 0.024), and ?-glutamyltransferase (-6.0 ± 6.0 compared with 1.0 ± 6.4 and 7.6 ± 11.4 IU/L; P < 0.001).

Conclusion: Synbiotic yogurt consumption improved hepatic steatosis and liver enzyme concentrations in patients with NAFLD. This trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials website (www.irct.ir) as IRCT2017020932417N2.

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https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/148/8/1276/5040615
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxy088DOI Listing
August 2018
170 Reads
3.875 Impact Factor

Nut and peanut butter consumption and the risk of esophageal and gastric cancer subtypes.

Am J Clin Nutr 2017 Sep 2;106(3):858-864. Epub 2017 Aug 2.

Metabolic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD;

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.117.159467DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5573026PMC
September 2017
177 Reads
3 Citations
6.770 Impact Factor

Synthesis and Spectral Characterization of Benzo-[6,7][1,5]diazocino[2,1-a]isoindol-12-(14H)-one Derivatives.

Molecules 2016 Jul 23;21(8). Epub 2016 Jul 23.

School of Life and Medical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/molecules21080967DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6274267PMC
July 2016
9 Reads
2.420 Impact Factor

The Nail as a Biomonitor of Trace Element Status in Golestan Cohort Study.

Middle East J Dig Dis 2016 Jan;8(1):19-23

Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.15171/mejdd.2016.02DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4773078PMC
January 2016
13 Reads
3 Citations

Systematic review of zinc biochemical indicators and risk of coronary heart disease.

ARYA Atheroscler 2015 Nov;11(6):357-65

Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Nutrition and Food Technology, National Nutrition and Food Technology Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4738046PMC
November 2015
139 Reads
4 Citations

Dietary intake of minerals and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: results from the Golestan Cohort Study.

Am J Clin Nutr 2015 Jul 27;102(1):102-8. Epub 2015 May 27.

Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran;

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https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/102/1/102/4564344
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.115.107847DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4480669PMC
July 2015
118 Reads
12 Citations
6.770 Impact Factor

Introduction of a New Diagnostic Method for Breast Cancer Based on Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) Test Data and Combining Intelligent Systems.

Iran J Cancer Prev 2012 ;5(4):169-77

Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4209568PMC
October 2014
10 Reads
1 Citation

Does fasting in Ramadan ameliorate Lipid profile? A prospective observational study.

Pak J Med Sci 2014 Jul;30(4):708-11

Maryam Hashemian, Research Center for Advanced Medical Technologies, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4121682PMC
July 2014
142 Reads

Top co-authors

Christian C Abnet
Christian C Abnet

National Cancer Institute

8
Hossein Poustchi
Hossein Poustchi

Tehran University of Medical Sciences

8
Reza Malekzadeh
Reza Malekzadeh

Digestive Oncology Research Center

7
Azita Hekmatdoost
Azita Hekmatdoost

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences

7
Sanford M Dawsey
Sanford M Dawsey

National Cancer Institute

6
Arash Etemadi
Arash Etemadi

Tehran University of Medical Sciences

6
Paolo Boffetta
Paolo Boffetta

Tisch Cancer Institute

5
Farin Kamangar
Farin Kamangar

National Cancer Institute

5
Akram Pourshams
Akram Pourshams

Digestive Oncology Research Center

5
Masoud Khoshnia
Masoud Khoshnia

Golestan University of Medical Sciences

4