Publications by authors named "Maryam Akbari"

103 Publications

Is driver education contributing towards road safety? a systematic review of systematic reviews.

J Inj Violence Res 2021 Jan 18;13(1). Epub 2021 Jan 18.

Department of Social Sciences, University of Nicosia, Cyprus.

Background: There is a vast amount of literature on the effects of driver education. However, the evidence has become somewhat fragmented, making it challenging to understand driver education's effectiveness for improving road safety. The current study aimed to provide the efficacy of pre-LDE and post-LDE interventions aimed at improving the safety of drivers (includes crashes, injuries, or secondary outcomes).

Methods: The following online databases were searched up to the 21st of February 2020: Web of Science (WOS), Scopus, PubMed, Cochrane library, and other relevant databases. Systematic reviews (SR) and meta-analyses were selected to investigate the efficacy of driving education in reducing crashes, injuries, or secondary outcomes. Two investigators independently conducted the data extraction and used the assessment of multiple systematic reviews (AMSTAR) tool to conduct a quality assessment of each SR identified.

Results: Out of the 229 potential articles, seven SRs were eligible for the current overview of systematic reviews and meta-analyses. This overview showed that pre-and post-license education by people of all ages led to improvements in secondary outcomes, such as performance, self-perceived driving abilities, behind-the-wheel driving performance, and even a small decrease in traffic offenses. However, education was not effective in reducing crashes or injuries, either at the individual or community level.

Conclusions: There was no evidence that driver education is an effective approach to reducing crashes or injuries. This negative result might be due to ineffective teaching methods. To improve road safety, it appears necessary to change the method or content of driving education since the current approaches to driving education do not reduce traffic crashes or injuries.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5249/jivr.v13i1.1592DOI Listing
January 2021

The effect of risk communication on preventive and protective Behaviours during the COVID-19 outbreak: mediating role of risk perception.

BMC Public Health 2021 01 6;21(1):54. Epub 2021 Jan 6.

Health Policy Research Center, Institute of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: The COVID-19 outbreak is a global pandemic, during which the community preventive and protective behaviors play a crucial role in the containment and control of infection. This study was designed to contribute to the existing knowledge on how risk communication (RC) and risk perception (RP) affect protective and preventive behaviors (PPB) during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Methods: The required data were extracted from a national online survey of Iranian adults aged 15 and older during March 15-19, 2020 (n=3213). Data analysis was performed using structural equation modeling.

Results: The study findings reveal that RC has direct and indirect positive effects on PB. Furthermore, this study also provides new evidence indicating that RP mediates the relationship between RC and PB and there is a two-way relationship between RC and RP. These interactions may have impact on risk communication strategies which should be adopted during this pandemic.

Conclusion: The study findings have remarkable implications for informing future communications as well as interventions during this ongoing outbreak and subsequent national risk events.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-020-10125-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7787415PMC
January 2021

TH17/IL23 cytokine gene polymorphisms in bullous pemphigoid.

Mol Genet Genomic Med 2020 12 19;8(12):e1519. Epub 2020 Dec 19.

Skin Research Centre, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: TH17/IL-23 immune axis is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most frequent autoimmune blistering disease, characterized by the presence of autoantibodies against the components of the dermal-epidermal junction. Animal studies and characterization of patient samples point toward a contribution of TH17 cells in BP pathogenesis. However, genetic polymorphisms in the genes of TH17/IL-23 cytokines have not yet been well investigated in BP.

Methods: Detection of polymorphisms in IL-17A (rs2275913 and rs3819025), IL-17F (rs2397084 and rs763780), IL-17RA (rs2229151), and IL-23R (rs2201841, rs7530511, rs11209026, and rs10889677) genes were performed following the collection of blood samples and DNA extraction from BP patients and controls. Gene expression of IL-23R was determined by quantitative RT-PCR analysis.

Results: The prevalence of IL-23R rs7530511 genotypes and alleles, as well as IL-23R rs2201841 alleles, is significantly different between the BP patients and controls. While the minor C-allele of IL-23R rs7530511 is highly present in the patients, the G-allele distribution of IL-23R rs2201841 is significantly more prevalent in the control individuals compared to the BP patients. Genotypes and alleles of other SNPs in IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17RA were similarly distributed in patients and controls.

Conclusions: No alteration was found in the gene expression between wild and polymorphic genotypes of IL-23R (rs2201841 and rs7530511) variations, indicating they do not contribute to altering the levels of gene expression in blood. In summary, our data show that the alleles of two SNPs in IL-23R rs2201841 and rs7530511 are associated with BP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mgg3.1519DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7767565PMC
December 2020

The coronavirus disease 2019: the prevalence, prognosis, and recovery from olfactory dysfunction (OD).

Acta Otolaryngol 2021 Feb 11;141(2):171-180. Epub 2020 Nov 11.

Otorhinolaryngology Research Center, Amir Alam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Many patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) complain from olfactory dysfunction (OD). To evaluate the prevalence, prognosis, and recovery from OD in COVID-19 patients.

Material And Methods: In this study, patients with COVID-19 symptoms who were referred to six different tertiary referral centres were recruited after positive results for COVID-19. All patients were assessed for a one-month follow-up after the initial diagnosis of COVID-19.

Results: Three hundred and eleven patients with COVID-19 were recruited in the present study. Two hundred and seven patients (66.6%) had a recent history of OD. One hundred and seventy-eight patients had experienced OD as a primary symptom intercurrent to other COVID-19 symptoms or solely. Sixty-nine patients had OD at the time of presentation to referral centres. Headache and nasal obstruction had significant relationships with recovery from OD in this subgroup, and the platelet count was the most important predictor for the recovery from OD. One hundred seventy-nine (86.4%) patients were nearly or fully recovered from OD approximately a month after the onset of OD.

Conclusion: Headache, nasal obstruction, and platelet count may have specific roles as prognostic factors in the recovery from OD.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00016489.2020.1836397DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7678411PMC
February 2021

Correction: The Effects of Calcium, Vitamins D and K co-Supplementation on Markers of Insulin Metabolism and Lipid Profiles in Vitamin D-Deficient Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes 2020 Nov 28;128(11):771. Epub 2020 Oct 28.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R. Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1270-8600DOI Listing
November 2020

Laboratory features of severe vs. non-severe COVID-19 patients in Asian populations: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Eur J Med Res 2020 Aug 3;25(1):30. Epub 2020 Aug 3.

Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: More severe cases of COVID- 19 are more likely to be hospitalized and around one-fifth, needing ICU admission. Understanding the common laboratory features of COVID-19 in more severe cases versus non-severe patients could be quite useful for clinicians and might help to predict the model of disease progression. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the laboratory test findings in severe vs. non-severe confirmed infected cases of COVID-19.

Methods: Electronic databases were systematically searched in PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar from the beginning of 2019 to 3rd of March 2020. Heterogeneity across included studies was determined using Cochrane's Q test and the I statistic. We used the fixed or random-effect models to pool the weighted mean differences (WMDs) or standardized mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

Findings: Out of a total of 3009 citations, 17 articles (22 studies, 21 from China and one study from Singapore) with 3396 ranging from 12 to1099 patients were included. Our meta-analyses showed a significant decrease in lymphocyte, monocyte, and eosinophil, hemoglobin, platelet, albumin, serum sodium, lymphocyte to C-reactive protein ratio (LCR), leukocyte to C-reactive protein ratio (LeCR), leukocyte to IL-6 ratio (LeIR), and an increase in the neutrophil, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), Procalcitonin (PCT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), fibrinogen, prothrombin time (PT), D-dimer, glucose level, and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in the severe group compared with the non-severe group. No significant changes in white blood cells (WBC), Creatine Kinase (CK), troponin I, myoglobin, IL-6 and K between the two groups were observed.

Interpretation: This meta-analysis provides evidence for the differentiation of severe cases of COVID-19 based on laboratory test results at the time of ICU admission. Future well-methodologically designed studies from other populations are strongly recommended.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40001-020-00432-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7396942PMC
August 2020

A multivariate multilevel analysis of the risk factors associated with anthropometric indices in Iranian mid-adolescents.

BMC Pediatr 2020 05 2;20(1):191. Epub 2020 May 2.

Department of Mathematics, Yasouj University, Yasouj, Iran.

Background: The present study was conducted to jointly assess some specific factors related to body fat measures using a multivariate multilevel analysis in a representative sample of Iranian mid-adolescents.

Methods: This study was conducted among 2538 students (1286 boys) aged 14-20 years old, who were randomly selected among 16 public high schools by multi-stage random sampling procedure from all education districts of Shiraz, Iran. Data on demographic characteristics, family history of obesity, physical activity, socio-economic (SES) variables and screen time were collected. Height, weight, triceps (TST), abdominal (AST), and subscapular (SST) skinfold thickness were measured and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. A multivariate multilevel approach was used to analyze the factors associated with obesity measures of the TST, AST, SST at the child and district levels.

Results: In this study, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was estimated to be 10.2 and 5.1%, respectively. Overall, the major portion of the total variance in TST (97.1%), AST (97.7%), and SST (97.5%) was found at the child level. The results of multivariate multilevel method revealed that being girls, having a family history of obesity, and SES were significantly associated with increasing of three body fat measures (all the p-values were less than 0.05). There were significant positive associations between moderate to vigorous physical activities with AST and SST (for AST: β =2.54, SE = 1.40, p = 0.05; for SST: β =2.24, SE = 1.20, p = 0.05). Compared to children in 14-16 age group, children in age group 16-18 years had less TST (β = - 0.67, SE = 0.34, p = 0.04). Furthermore, other age groups and screen time did not play an important role in three outcome variables.

Conclusions: The results showed some factors that contribute to three body fat measures. Therefore, it is necessary to develop effective interventions to prevent the effects of individual and environmental undesirable factors on childhood obesity in both family and community levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12887-020-02104-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7195711PMC
May 2020

Quercetin and cancer: new insights into its therapeutic effects on ovarian cancer cells.

Cell Biosci 2020 10;10:32. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

5Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Institute for Basic Sciences, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R. of Iran.

Ovarian cancer is known as a serious malignancy that affects women's reproductive tract and can considerably threat their health. A wide range of molecular mechanisms and genetic modifications have been involved in ovarian cancer pathogenesis making it difficult to develop effective therapeutic platforms. Hence, discovery and developing new therapeutic approaches are required. Medicinal plants, as a new source of drugs, could potentially be used alone or in combination with other medicines in the treatment of various cancers such as ovarian cancer. Among various natural compounds, quercetin has shown great anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. In vitro and in vivo experiments have revealed that quercetin possesses a cytotoxic impact on ovarian cancer cells. Despite obtaining good results both in vitro and in vivo, few clinical studies have assessed the anti-cancer effects of quercetin particularly in the ovarian cancer. Therefore, it seems that further clinical studies may introduce quercetin as therapeutic agent alone or in combination with other chemotherapy drugs to the clinical setting. Here, we not only summarize the anti-cancer effects of quercetin but also highlight the therapeutic effects of quercetin in the ovarian cancer.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13578-020-00397-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7063794PMC
March 2020

The effects of resveratrol on lipid profiles and liver enzymes in patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Lipids Health Dis 2020 Feb 17;19(1):25. Epub 2020 Feb 17.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, IR, Iran.

Background: There are current trials investigating the effect of resveratrol supplementation on lipid profiles and liver enzymes among patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and related disorders; however, their findings are controversial. This systematic review and meta-analysis were aimed to determine the effects of resveratrol supplementation on lipid profiles and liver enzymes among patients with MetS and related disorders.

Methods: We performed a comprehensive search of the following online databases up to November 2018: Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. The relevant articles were assessed for quality of studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool.

Results: Out of 2459 citations, 31 articles were appropriate for including to the current meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated that resveratrol use significantly decreased total cholesterol [weighted mean difference (WMD) = - 7.65 mg/dL; 95% CI, - 12.93, - 2.37; P < 0.01; I: 83.4%] and increased gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) concentrations (WMD = 1.76 U/l; 95% CI, 0.58, 2.94; P < 0.01; I: 20.1%). We found no significant effect of resveratrol supplementation on triglycerides (WMD = - 5.84 mg/dL; 95% CI, - 12.68, 1.00; P = 0.09; I: 66.8%), LDL- (WMD = -2.90 mg/dL; 95% CI, - 10.88, 5.09; P = 0.47; I: 96.0%), HDL-cholesterol (WMD = 0.49 mg/dL; 95% CI, - 0.80, 1.78; P = 0.45; I: 74.0%), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (WMD = -0.14 U/l; 95% CI, - 3.69, 3.41; P = 0.93; I: 79.6%), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (WMD = -0.34 U/l; 95% CI, - 2.94, 2.27; P = 0.80; I: 88.0%) concentrations.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis demonstrated that resveratrol supplementation among patients with MetS and related disorders significantly reduced total cholesterol and increased GGT concentrations, but did not affect triglycerides, LDL-, HDL-cholesterol, ALT, and AST concentrations. This data suggests that resveratrol may have a potential cardio-protective effect in patients with MetS and related disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12944-020-1198-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7026982PMC
February 2020

Are Industry Payments Associated With the Level of Evidence in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2020 Apr 13;78(4):502-506. Epub 2019 Dec 13.

OMFS Residency Program Director and Education Director, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA. Electronic address:

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the industry payments in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) are associated with a study's level of evidence (LOE).

Materials And Methods: A retrospective cohort study was designed and implemented to query the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery from 2002 to 2016. The primary predictor variables were the presence of a self-reported conflict of interest (COI) and the type of COI. The outcome variable was the LOE. The secondary outcome variables investigated were the topic of the study and the inclusion of trainees. The inclusion criteria entailed contributions from domestic academic OMS training programs. Disclosure of the COIs and type of COI, the LOE, topic of the study, and inclusion of trainees were recorded for every report from January 2002 until December 2016. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and χ tests were performed to determine a significant relationship primarily between the COIs and LOE.

Results: The sample included 1455 reports, and 4.2% of the sample size had disclosed a COI. The studies that disclosed industry payments demonstrated a significant positive correlation with the LOE (P < .01), especially for cohort studies. Also, the type of COI was significantly associated with the LOE (P < .05). Industry payments were not shown to be significantly related statistically to topic of the study (P = .16); however, the stock-related payments were associated with the topic (P < .05). No association was found between COI disclosure and trainee contribution.

Conclusions: The results have indicated that industry payments are associated with the LOE in the OMS literature. Further studies are needed to elucidate both the accuracy of the financial disclosures by comparing them with publicly available open payment databases and the perceptions of the OMSs, their trainees, and their patients regarding the influence of industry payments on the specialty's academic interests.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joms.2019.12.006DOI Listing
April 2020

The effects of alpha-lipoic acid supplementation on fasting glucose and lipid profiles among patients with stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

J Diabetes Metab Disord 2019 Dec 29;18(2):585-595. Epub 2019 Jul 29.

9Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R. Iran.

Background And Objective: Stroke is a devastating condition with long-term comorbidities including metabolic abnormalities. Alpha lipoic acid (ALA), with its antioxidant properties, might improve metabolic status of patients, though current evidence is still inclusive. This systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to summarize the existing evidence regarding the effects of ALA supplementation on fasting glucose and lipid profiles among patients with stroke.

Methods: We searched Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Web of Science from 1990 until April 5th, 2018. The relevant randomized-controlled articles, based on defined key words, were included in the analyses. Two independent researchers investigated study eligibility, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias for included studies. Heterogeneity among included studies was tested using Q-test and I statistics. Random-effects models were applied to pool the data and standardized mean differences (WMD) were considered as summary effect size.

Results: A total of five studies (140 patients in each intervention group) were included in our meta-analysis. The findings showed that ALA supplementation significantly decreased fasting glucose levels (WMD -36.93 mg/dL; 95% CI, -65.58, -8.28;  = 0.01; I = 85.0%) in patients with stroke. We found no significant effect of ALA supplementation on triglycerides (WMD -7.45 mg/dL; 95% CI, -51.35, 36.45;  = 0.739; I = 83.9%), total cholesterol (WMD -23.23 mg/dL; 95% CI, -48.07, 1.62;  = 0.067; I = 80.5%), LDL-cholesterol (WMD -10.46 mg/dL; 95% CI, -21.01, 0.09;  = 0.052; I = 47.4%) and HDL-cholesterol levels (WMD -3.02 mg/dL; 95% CI, -20.18, 14.14;  = 0.730; I = 85.8%).

Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggested the beneficial impacts of ALA supplementation in improving fasting glucose of patients diagnosed with stroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40200-019-00423-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6915248PMC
December 2019

Results of a Campaign for Motorcycle Helmets Advocacy in a City in Southwest of Iran; A Population-Based Intervention Study.

Bull Emerg Trauma 2019 Oct;7(4):404-410

Health Policy Research Center, Institute of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Objective: We conducted a triple phase project for motorcycle helmets advocacy in Darab, a city in southwest Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the project on decreasing the hazards of motorcycle accidents.

Methods: Using a questionnaire, data for ICU admission rates, hospital costs for patients who required ICU admission, rate of helmet usage, mortality and the duration of ICU care for patients admitted to Darab hospital due to motorcycle accidents in Winter 2015 (before conducting the project) and Winter 2016 (after conducting the project) were gathered and compared. This feature was also separately done for patients younger than 17 years.

Results: The rate of wearing helmets increased significantly in winter 2016 (from 3.4 % to 33%). Also ICU admission rate due to head trauma was significantly decreased after the project was done (from 14.5 % to 4%). However, hospital costs for patients required ICU admission were increased in winter 2016. This increase, though not significant, seems to be due to an increase in health service expenses in the year 2016 as compared with the year 2015. The mortality rate was not significantly changed between the two mentioned years results. For patients younger than 17 years, no ICU admissions were needed in winter 2016.

Conclusion: Even a short period of intervention can have positive effects on increasing the safety of motorcycle drivers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.29252/beat-070410DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6911718PMC
October 2019

Palladated Nanocomposite of Halloysite-Nitrogen-Doped Porous Carbon Prepared from a Novel Cyano-/Nitrile-Free Task Specific Ionic Liquid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogenation.

ACS Omega 2019 Nov 8;4(21):19442-19451. Epub 2019 Nov 8.

Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Alzahra University, Vanak, Tehran, Tehran 1993891176, Iran.

A novel nitrile-/cyano-free ionic liquid was synthesized and carbonized under two different carbonization methods in the presence of ZnCl as a catalyst to afford N-doped carbon materials. It was found that the carbonization condition could affect the nature and textural properties of the resulting carbon. In the following, ionic liquid-derived carbon was hybridized with naturally occurring halloysite nanotubes via two procedures, that is, hydrothermal treatment of halloysite and as-prepared carbon and carbonization of ionic liquid in the presence of halloysite. The two novel nanocomposites were then used for stabilizing Pd nanoparticles. Examining the structures and catalytic activities of the resulting catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes in aqueous media showed that the carbonization procedure and hybridization method could affect the structure and the catalytic activity of the catalysts and hydrothermal approach, in which the structure of halloysite is preserved, leading to the catalyst with superior catalytic activity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.9b02887DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6868904PMC
November 2019

A new multi-epitope peptide vaccine induces immune responses and protection against Leishmania infantum in BALB/c mice.

Med Microbiol Immunol 2020 Feb 6;209(1):69-79. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Basic Sciences in Infectious Diseases Research Center, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a tropical and subtropical disease which is endemic in more than eighty countries around the world. Leishmania infantum is one of the main causative agents of VL disease. Currently, there is no approved-to-market vaccine for VL therapy. In this study, we evaluated cellular and humoral immune responses induced by our newly designed multi-epitope vaccine in BALB/c mice. Four antigenic proteins, including histone H1, sterol 24-c-methyltransferase (SMT), Leishmania-specific hypothetical protein (LiHy), and Leishmania-specific antigenic protein (LSAP) were chosen for the prediction of potential immunodominant epitopes. Moreover, to enhance vaccine immunogenicity, two toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) agonists, resuscitation-promoting factors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (RpfE and RpfB), were employed as the built-in adjuvants. Immunization with the designed multi-epitope vaccine elicited a robust Th1-type immune response, compared to other groups, as shown by increased levels of IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IgG2a. Furthermore, a significant decrease was observed in Th-2-type-related cytokines such as IL-4 in immunized mice. The designed construct also induced a significant reduction in parasite load (p < 0.0001), conferring protection against L. infantum challenge. This study could be promising in gaining insight towards the potential of peptide epitope-based vaccines as effective protective approaches against Leishmania species.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00430-019-00640-7DOI Listing
February 2020

Correction: The effects of melatonin supplementation on blood pressure in patients with metabolic disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

J Hum Hypertens 2020 May;34(5):413

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41371-019-0278-8DOI Listing
May 2020

The effects of vitamin D supplementation on muscle function among postmenopausal women: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

EXCLI J 2019 6;18:591-603. Epub 2019 Aug 6.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

The loss of muscle mass and its strength is one of the most critical changes in aging which is associated with an increased risk of falls, osteoporotic fractures and mobility disability. Vitamin D, with its extra-skeletal benefits, might improve muscle function in elderly. The current systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to summarize available relevant data and determine the effect of vitamin D supplementation on muscle function among postmenopausal women. We reached databases including; Cochrane library, Embase, PubMed, and Web of Science database until the end of May 2018 to identify relevant published RCTs. Heterogeneity among included studies was assessed using Q-test and I statistics. Random-effect model was applied to pool data and weighted mean difference (WMD) was calculated representing summary effect size. Outcomes of interest included the effects of vitamin D supplementation on hand grip strength (HGS), back muscle strength (BMS), and Timed Up and Go (TUG). Twelve RCTs out of 1739 potential reports were included in our meta-analysis. The pooled findings showed that vitamin D supplementation had no significant effect on HGS (WMD -0.03 kilogram (Kg); 95 % CI, -0.26, 0.20; P=0.78), BMS (WMD 7.21 newton (N); 95 % CI, -5.98, 20.40; P=0.28), and TUG (WMD 0.01 second (S); 95 % CI, -0.17, 0.18; P=0.93) in postmenopausal women. Overall, the current meta-analysis showed that taking vitamin D supplementation by postmenopausal women did not affect markers of muscle function. Further studies are required to confirm the effect of vitamin D supplementation on markers of muscle function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.17179/excli2019-1386DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6785780PMC
August 2019

Prevalence of BRAF gene mutation in samples of primary and metastatic colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis.

Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) 2019 Nov 3;28(6):e13160. Epub 2019 Sep 3.

Faculty of Health, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.

Introduction: Understanding the prevalence and biology of BRAF gene can improve the treatment methods of cancerous patients. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of BRAF gene mutation in samples of primary and metastatic colorectal cancer using meta-analysis method.

Methods: We searched PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Ovid and Google Scholar motor engine using MeSH terms of relevant keywords. During the screening phase, titles, abstracts and full texts were reviewed and risk of bias was assessed for all selected papers based on Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) checklist. The results of the primary studies were combined using meta-analysis.

Results: Of 95 eligible studies entered into the meta-analysis, prevalence of BRAF gene mutation had been assessed among 19,484 primary tumour samples as well as 12,256 metastatic samples. The total prevalence of BRAF gene mutation among primary tumour samples was estimated as of 10.16% (8.09-12.22) in the world, 0.41% (0-1.89) in EMRO region, 10.06% (7.54-12.59) in EURO region, 10.33% (7.24-13.43) in SEARO region and 11.33% (7.29-15.37) in WPRO region. The pooled estimates for BRAF gene mutation in metastatic samples were 6.53% (5.09-7.96), 8.07% (5.57-10.56), 5.38% (3.75-7.02) and 5.55% (1.72-9.38) for all regions, EURO, WPRO and PAHO regions respectively.

Conclusion: Our results showed evidences of BRAF gene mutation in one-tenth of primary colorectal tumour samples in EURO, PAHO, SEARO and WPRO regions which was considerably higher than that of the EMRO region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecc.13160DOI Listing
November 2019

The impact of diabetics and smoking on gender differences of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis incidence.

Indian J Tuberc 2019 Jul 3;66(3):353-357. Epub 2017 Feb 3.

Health Policy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: Several determinants are responsible for different incidences of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). The main determinants are cigarette smoking and diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of these risk factors effect modifiers in TB/gender association.

Methodology: In this retrospective cohort, relative risk of gender in developing smear positive TB as well as its interaction with smoking and diabetes mellitus were investigated.

Results: Of 1243 smear positive TB cases, 63.2% were male. Prevalences of diabetes mellitus among men and women TB cases were 9.2% and 22.9% respectively (p<0.001). Frequency of cigarette smoking among men was significantly higher than that in women (61.7% vs. 7.6% respectively, p<0.001). Male gender, increased the risk of developing smear positive TB as of 98% and 5% in smokers and non-smokers respectively (p=0.001), indicating an interaction between gender and smoking in the effect on TB. In addition, male gender increased the risk of TB as of 13% and 34% in patients with and without diabetes mellitus respectively (p=0.300) indicating no interaction between gender and diabetes mellitus on TB incidence.

Conclusion: Our study showed that cigarette smoking is a determinant factor for gender differences in TB incidence but diabetes mellitus does not affect the association between TB and gender.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijtb.2017.01.004DOI Listing
July 2019

Incidence Rate of Gastric Cancer Adenocarcinoma in Patients With Gastric Dysplasia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

J Clin Gastroenterol 2019 Nov/Dec;53(10):703-710

Health Policy Research Center, Institute of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, I.R. Iran.

Several studies have reported the risk of progression to gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) in patients with gastric dysplasia (GD); however, the findings are controversial. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to study the incidence rate of GAC among patients with GD. Using a comprehensive search strategy, we systematically searched online databases including PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases for identifying all relevant original articles through inception until July 2018. Cochran Q and I tests were used to assess heterogeneities between included studies. The incidence rates of GAC and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using random-effect or fixed-effect models. Of the 1980 retrieved records, 30 eligible articles (61 studies) were included. The overall pooled incidence rate of GAC was 40.36 (95% CI, 27.08-55.71; I, 96.0%) cases per 1000 person-years in patients with GD. Subgroup analysis according to the type of GD indicated the highest incidence rate of GAC was 186.40 (95% CI, 106.63-285.60; I, 94.6%) per 1000 person-years among patients with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) lesions. Although the incidence rates of GAC in low-grade dysplasia (LGD) lesions and in nonclassified lesions were 11.25 (95% CI, 3.91-21.22; I, 89.3%), and 1.40 (95% CI, 0.00-9.71; I, 78.8%), respectively. Compared with patients with LGD lesions, progression rate from GD to GAC was roughly 16 times greater in patients with HGD lesions. As the majority of patients with GAC are diagnosed in an advanced stage our study suggests strict management of HGD lesions to prevent GAC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0000000000001257DOI Listing
September 2020

Vitamin D Status in Women with Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.

J Midlife Health 2019 Apr-Jun;10(2):57-62

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

The current evidence regarding the association between vitamin D status and pelvic floor disorder (PFD) are inconclusive. This meta-analysis was aimed to summarize existing data demonstrating the association between Vitamin D status and PFD using published observational studies. All national and international databases including Web of Science, PubMed, Google Scholar, and Scopus were searched up until January 30, 2018, and related published studies retrieved for meta-analysis. The effect sizes of Vitamin D status were presented as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI), using random-effect models and inverse variance method. The Cochran Q statistic and tests were used to evaluate the heterogeneity across included studies. Seven studies with 3219 women were included our meta-analysis. There was heterogeneity existing among included studies ( = 96.4%, < 0.001), so a random-effect model was used. The findings of this meta-analysis revealed that the mean serum Vitamin D levels in women with PFD were significantly lower than healthy women (SMD -0.60; 95% CI, -1.06, -0.13; = 0.01). This meta-analysis demonstrates lower levels of serum Vitamin D in women with PFD rather than healthy women. Additional prospective studies regarding the association between Vitamin D status and PFD are required to confirm our findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/jmh.JMH_9_19DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6643706PMC
August 2019

Gastric cancer in patients with gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

PLoS One 2019 26;14(7):e0219865. Epub 2019 Jul 26.

Health Policy Research Center, Institute of Health, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

Aim: Intestinal metaplasia (IM) and gastric atrophy (GA) are precancerous lesions in the stomach. There is a large debate on natural course of these lesions and surveillance strategy in these patients. This meta-analysis was aimed to find the most appropriate follow up and the rate of progression from IM and GA to GC.

Methods: This meta-analysis is followed and reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Electronic databases including EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science databases, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library were searched until July 2018. Cochran's Q test and I-square (I2) test were used to examine heterogeneity across included studies. We pooled data using random-effect or fixed effect models indicated as incidence rate or proportion with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The variables of study included demographic data, endoscopy interval, follow up interval and time, GA and IM type and GC stage. Moreover, incidence rate of GC and progress rate, regress and persistence proportion in both GA and IM patients were assessed.

Results: Overall, 68 original articles out of 32981 citations were included in our meta-analysis. The pooled GC incidence rate in patients with GA was 1.24 (95% CI, 0.80, 1.76; I2: 83.6%) cases per 1,000 person-years. The rates of later diagnosis of IM and gastric dysplasia in patients with GA were estimated as 41.42 (95% CI, 3.11, 64.45; I2: 95.6%) and 6.23 (95% CI, 2.34, 11.46; I2: 83.0%) cases per 1,000 person-years, respectively. The pooled regressed proportion was 32.23 (95% CI, 18.07-48.02; I2: 94.0%) and the persistence proportion was 38.83 (95% CI, 20.20-59.13; I2: 97.0%) per 100 observations in GA patients. In IM studies, the pooled incidence rate of GC was 3.38 (95% CI, 2.13, 4.85; I2: 93.4%) cases per 1,000 person-years. The progressed rate to dysplasia in IM patient was estimated to be 12.51 (95% CI, 5.45, 22.03; I2: 95.1%) cases per 1,000 person-years. The pooled regressed proportion was 31.83 (95% CI, 25.48-38.51; I2: 91.0%) and the persistence proportion was 43.46 (95% CI, 32.52-54.71; I2: 96.0%) per 100 observations in IM patients.

Conclusion: Overall, the incidence of GC in patients with IM and GA are low but there is heterogeneity in data with the highest rate in Asian, males with those with incomplete IM. There is probability of regression or persistence without progression in patients with IM and GA who receive appropriate management.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0219865PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6660080PMC
February 2020

Gestational diabetes mellitus in association with macrosomia in Iran: a meta-analysis.

J Diabetes Metab Disord 2019 Jun 21;18(1):41-50. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

9Health Sciences Research Center, Faculty of Health, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran.

Purpose: This meta-analysis aimed to estimate the association between gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and occurrence of macrosomia for the first time among Iranian population.

Methods: A systematic review was done of national and international databases. Lists of relevant articles were checked to increase sensitivity of the search reference. Also, access to unpublished articles and documents were accessed by negotiation with related individuals and research centers. These published epidemiological studies (cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies) were used for comparisons to determine whether GDM was associated with macrosomia. Finally, the Mantel-Haenszel method and the fixed and random-effect models based on heterogeneity of the primary studies were used according to pool results and estimate the odds ratio of macrosomia in women with GDM.

Results: Of 1870 articles, thirty relevant articles were eligible for the current meta-analysis. Our findings showed that 335 of 2524 women with GDM had macrosomia while only 775 of 26,592 women without GDM had macrosomia. Using random-effect model, the pooled odds ratio (OR) relation between GDM and occurrence of macrosomia was estimated as of 5.49 (95% CI: 4.27-7.04). Subgroup analysis showed no difference regarding different study designs and definitions of macrosomia. There was no evidence of publication bias based on the result of Egger's test (β = 0.1,  = 0.70).

Conclusions: This meta-analysis shows that GDM is directly associated with the risk of macrosomia in the Iranian population. This confirms the findings of previous studies in the wider scientific literature.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40200-019-00388-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6582006PMC
June 2019

The Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation on Endothelial Function and Blood Pressures Among Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

High Blood Press Cardiovasc Prev 2019 Aug 1;26(4):305-319. Epub 2019 Jul 1.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran.

Introduction: There are current trials investigating the effect of resveratrol supplementation on endothelial function and blood pressures among patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS); however, the findings are controversial.

Aim: This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were carried out to summarize the effects of resveratrol supplementation on endothelial activation and blood pressures among patients with MetS and related disorders.

Methods: We searched systematically online databases including: PubMed-Medline, Embase, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials until October, 2018. Two independent authors extracted data and assessed the quality of included articles. Data were pooled using the fixed- or random-effects model and considered as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).

Results: Out of 831 electronic citations, 28 RCTs (with 33 findings reported) were included in the meta-analyses. The findings showed that resveratrol intervention significantly increased flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) levels (SMD 1.77; 95% CI 0.25, 3.29; P = 0.02; I: 96.5). However, resveratrol supplements did not affect systolic blood pressure (SBP) (SMD - 0.27; 95% CI - 0.57, 0.03; P = 0.07; I: 88.9) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (SMD - 0.21; 95% CI - 0.52, 0.11; P = 0.19; I: 89.8).

Conclusions: Resveratrol supplementation significantly increased FMD among patients with MetS and related disorders, but did not affect SBP and DBP. Additional prospective studies are needed to investigate the effect of resveratrol supplementation on endothelial function and blood pressures, using higher-dose of resveratrol with longer durations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40292-019-00324-6DOI Listing
August 2019

The Effects of Curcumin on Weight Loss Among Patients With Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Front Pharmacol 2019 12;10:649. Epub 2019 Jun 12.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

The current systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was carried out to assess the influence of curcumin intake on weight among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders. We searched the following databases up until January 2018: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The relevant data were extracted and evaluated for quality of the studies in accordance with the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data were pooled using the inverse variance method and expressed as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). Eighteen articles (21 studies) that comprised a total of 1,604 individuals were finally included in the meta-analysis. Curcumin intake significantly reduced body mass index (BMI) (SMD -0.37; 95% CI, -0.61, -0.13; < 0.01), weight (SMD -0.23; 95% CI, -0.39, -0.06; < 0.01), waist-circumference (WC) (SMD -0.25; 95% CI, -0.44, -0.05; = 0.01), leptin levels (SMD -0.97; 95% CI, -1.18, -0.75; < 0.001) and increased adiponectin levels (SMD 1.05; 95% CI, 0.23, 1.87; = 0.01). We found no significant effect of curcumin intake on hip ratio (HR) (SMD -0.17; 95% CI, -0.42, 0.08; = 0.18). Overall, we have found that curcumin intake among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders was correlated with a significant reduction in BMI, weight, WC, and leptin, and a significant increase in adiponectin levels, but did not affect HR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2019.00649DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6582779PMC
June 2019

The effects of mobile health interventions on lipid profiles among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Diabetes Metab Syndr 2019 May - Jun;13(3):1949-1955. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R, Iran. Electronic address:

Objective: The current systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was conducted to summarize the effect of mobile health (m-health) interventions on lipid profiles among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders.

Methods: Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, and Web of Science databases were searched to indentify the relevant randomized clinical trials published up April 30, 2018. Two reviewers examined study eligibility, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias of included clinical trials, individually. Heterogeneity was measured using I-square (I) statistic and Cochran's Q test. Data were pooled the standardized mean difference (SMD) effect size by the random-effect model.

Results: 18 trials of 1681 citations were identified to be appropriate for the current meta-analysis. Findings random-effects model indicated that m-health interventions significantly decreased total- (SMD -0.54; 95% CI, -1.05, -0.03) and LDL-cholesterol levels (SMD -0.66; 95% CI, -1.18, -0.15). M-health interventions had no significant effect on triglycerides (SMD -0.14; 95% CI, -0.56, 0.28) and HDL-cholesterol levels (SMD -0.35; 95% CI, -0.81, 0.11).

Conclusion: Overall, the current meta-analysis demonstrated that m-health interventions resulted in an improvement in total- and LDL-cholesterol, but did not affect triglycerides and HDL-cholesterol levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.dsx.2019.04.011DOI Listing
December 2019

The Effects of Probiotic Supplementation on Clinical Symptom, Weight Loss, Glycemic Control, Lipid and Hormonal Profiles, Biomarkers of Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Probiotics Antimicrob Proteins 2019 Jun 4. Epub 2019 Jun 4.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran.

The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) is to determine the effectiveness of probiotic supplementation on clinical symptoms, weight loss, glycemic control, lipid and hormonal profiles, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Eligible studies were systematically searched from Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, and Web of Science databases until January 2019. Cochran (Q) and I-square statistics were used to measure heterogeneity among included studies. Data were pooled by using random-effect model and expressed as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Eleven articles were included in this meta-analysis. Probiotic supplementation significantly decreased weight (SMD - 0.30; 95% CI, - 0.53, - 0.07; P = 0.01), body mass index (BMI) (SMD - 0.29; 95% CI, - 0.54, - 0.03; P = 0.02), fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (SMD - 0.26; 95% CI, - 0.45, - 0.07; P < 0.001), insulin (SMD - 0.52; 95% CI, - 0.81, - 0.24; P < 0.001), homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (SMD - 0.53; 95% CI, - 0.79, - 0.26; P < 0.001), triglycerides (SMD - 0.69; 95% CI, - 0.99, - 0.39; P < 0.001), VLDL-cholesterol (SMD - 0.69; 95% CI, - 0.99, - 0.39; P < 0.001), C-reactive protein (CRP) (SMD - 1.26; 95% CI, - 2.14, - 0.37; P < 0.001), malondialdehyde (MDA) (SMD - 0.90; 95% CI, - 1.16, - 0.63; P < 0.001), hirsutism (SMD - 0.58; 95% CI, - 1.01, - 0.16; P < 0.001), and total testosterone levels (SMD - 0.58; 95% CI, - 0.82, - 0.34; P < 0.001), and also increased the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (SMD 0.41; 95% CI, 0.11, 0.70; P < 0.01), nitric oxide (NO) (SMD 0.33; 95% CI 0.08, 0.59; P = 0.01), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) (SMD 0.64; 95% CI, 0.38, 0.90; P < 0.001), glutathione (GSH) (SMD 0.26; 95% CI, 0.01, 0.52; P = 0.04), and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels (SMD 0.46; 95% CI, 0.08, 0.85; P = 0.01). Probiotic supplementation may result in an improvement in weight, BMI, FPG, insulin, HOMA-IR, triglycerides, VLDL-cholesterol, CRP, MDA, hirsutism, total testosterone, QUICKI, NO, TAC, GSH, and SHBG but did not affect dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels, and total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol levels in patients with PCOS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12602-019-09559-0DOI Listing
June 2019

Histopathological and Molecular Evaluation of the Experimentally Infected Goats by the Larval Forms of .

Iran J Parasitol 2019 Jan-Mar;14(1):95-105

Department of Parasitology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran.

Background: Introduction of and as two separate species have been recognized mainly on morphological grounds. This experimental study was conducted to test whether cerebral and non-cerebral forms of belong to one origin or they are originated from two different tape worms.

Methods: Two groups of dogs were infected with the cerebral and muscular sources of the coenuri cysts. About two months later the eggs were collected from the fecal samples to be used to experimentally infect other healthy goats. Histopathological and molecular evaluation was conducted in two groups of goats that were challenged with eggs obtained from the infected dogs by brain and muscular sources of coenuri cysts in School of Veterinary Medicine of Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran in 2015. All aberrant sites of predilection of the metacestode in goats were muscles, heart, diaphragm and lungs. The brain and spinal cord were carefully dissected and examined but the cysts were not found in these locations. In addition, the molecular genetic markers of mitochondrial DNA ( and ) were applied to resolve the questionable relationship between and .

Results: The larval stages of in brain and in other aberrant sites, which showed similar morphological criteria, were monophyletic species.

Conclusion: Therefore, must be considered taxonomically invalid.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6511590PMC
May 2019

Meta-analysis of the correlation between personality characteristics and risky driving behaviors.

J Inj Violence Res 2019 Jul 28;11(2):107-122. Epub 2019 Apr 28.

Health Policy Research Center, Institute of Health, Student Research Committee, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. Email:

Background: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to determine the relationships risky driving behaviors (RDBs) have with the big five personality factors, sensation seeking and driving anger.

Methods: The PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, Psychinfo, and the Cochrane Library databases were systematically searched. All original studies were retrieved that assessed the relationships RDBs had with the big five personality factors, sensation seeking, and driving anger. Heterogeneity between studies was examined using the Cochran Q statistic and I2 tests. After applying Fisher's r-to-z transformation, the correlation coefficients (r) were summarized from each study and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated.

Results: Overall, 22 studies were included in the meta-analysis, which included 11211 participants. The results showed that RDBs had a significant negative relationship with agreeableness (r -0.27; 95% CI, -0.36, -0.19; P less than 0.0001), but significant positive relationships with neuroticism (r 0.16; 95% CI, 0.03, 0.29; P=0.584), sensation seeking (r 0.28; 95% CI: 0.23, 0.33; P less than 0.0001) and driving anger (r 0.39; 95% CI: 0.14, 0.64; P=0.002). Conversely, RDBs were not significantly related to extraversion (r -0.01; 95% CI, -0.08, 0.05; P=0.705), conscientiousness (r -0.05; 95% CI, -0.21, 0.12; P=0.584), or openness (r -0.06; 95% CI, -0.12, 0.00; P=0.065).

Conclusions: Therefore, it appears that individuals most likely to engage in risky driving behaviors would be low in agreeableness, but high in neuroticism, sensation seeking and driving anger.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5249/jivr.v11i2.1172DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6646834PMC
July 2019

The effects of quercetin supplementation on lipid profiles and inflammatory markers among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 2020 24;60(11):1855-1868. Epub 2019 Apr 24.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.

This systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed to determine the effect of quercetin administration on lipid profiles and inflammatory markers among patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and related disorders. We searched systematically online databases including Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and Web of Science to identify the relevant RCTs until November 2018. -test and statistics were applied to assess heterogeneity among included studies. Data were combined using fixed- or random-effects model and presented as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Out of 591 citations, 16 RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled findings showed that quercetin consumption significantly decreased total-cholesterol (SMD = -0.98; 95% CI, -1.48, -0.49;  < 0.001; : 94.0), LDL-cholesterol (SMD = -0.88; 95% CI, -1.35, -0.41;  < 0.001; : 92.7) and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (-0.64; 95% CI, -1.03, -0.25;  = 0.001; : 90.2). While, quercetin supplementation did not significantly affect triglycerides (TG) (SMD = -0.32; 95% CI, -0.68, 0.04;  = 0.08; : 84.8), HDL-cholesterol (SMD = 0.20; 95% CI, -0.20, 0.24;  = 0.84; : 70.6), interleukin 6 (IL-6) (SMD = -0.69; 95% CI, -1.69, 0.31;  = 0.17; : 94.5) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels (SMD = -0.06; 95% CI, -0.25, 0.14;  = 0.58; : 35.6) In summary, the current meta-analysis demonstrated that quercetin supplementation significantly reduced total-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and CRP levels, yet did not affect triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, IL-6 and TNF-α among patients with MetS and related disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10408398.2019.1604491DOI Listing
July 2020