Publications by authors named "Mary Jo Fitz-Gerald"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Framework for creating an incident command center during crises.

Best Pract Res Clin Anaesthesiol 2021 Oct 16;35(3):377-388. Epub 2020 Nov 16.

Department of Anesthesiology, LSU Health Shreveport, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71103, USA. Electronic address:

The Hospital Incident Command System (HICS) is an incident management system specific to hospitals based on the principles of Incident Command System (ICS), and it includes prevention, protection, mitigation, response, and recovery. It plays a crucial role in effective and timely response during the periods of disasters, mass casualties, and public health emergencies. In recent times, hospitals have used a customized HICS structure to coordinate effective responses to public health problems such as the Ebola outbreak in the US and SARS epidemic in Taiwan. The current COVID-19 pandemic has placed unprecedented challenges on the healthcare system, necessitating the creation of HICS that can help in the proper allocation of resources and ineffective utilization of healthcare personnel. The key elements in managing a response to this pandemic include screening and early diagnosis, quarantining affected individuals, monitoring disease progression, delivering appropriate treatment, and ensuring an adequate supply of personal protective equipment (PPE) to healthcare staff.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpa.2020.11.008DOI Listing
October 2021

Lamotrigine and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Prevention.

Psychopharmacol Bull 2021 Mar;51(2):96-114

Edinoff, MD, Nguyen, MD, Gerald, MD, Louisiana State University Health Science Center Shreveport, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, Shreveport, LA. Crane, BS, Lewis, BS, St Pierre, BS, Louisiana State University Shreveport School of Medicine, Shreveport, LA. Alan D. Kaye, MD, PhD, Louisiana State University New Orleans, Department of Anesthesiology, New Orleans, LA, Louisiana State University Shreveport, Department of Anesthesiology, Shreveport, LA. Gennuso, MD, Louisiana State University Shreveport, Department of Anesthesiology, Shreveport, LA. Adam M. Kaye, PharmD, Jessica S. Kaye, Thomas J. Long School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, University of the Pacific, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Stockton, CA. Rachel J. Kaye, BA, Medical College of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. Varrassi, MD, PhD, FIPP, Paolo Procacci Foundation, Via Tacito 7, Roma, Italy. Viswanath, MD, Louisiana State University Shreveport, Department of Anesthesiology, Shreveport, LA, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ, Creighton University School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Omaha, NE, Valley Anesthesiology and Pain Consultants-Envision Physician Services, Phoenix, AZ. Urits, MD, Louisiana State University Shreveport, Department of Anesthesiology, Shreveport, LA, Southcoast Health, Southcoast Physicians Group Pain Medicine, Wareham, MA.

Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) is a rare life-threatening condition characterized by severe mucocutaneous epidermal necrolysis and detachment of the epidermis. The condition centers around a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction with a complex etiology stemming from a variety of causes. The number one cause is medication-related-common ones including sulfonamides, antiepileptics, allopurinol, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Genetics also play a role as several human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes within certain ethnic groups have been implicated in adverse reactions to specific drugs. HLAB*15:02 has been identified in the Chinese and others of Southeast Asian origin to increase susceptibility to lamotrigine and carbamazepine-induced SJS. Furthermore, patients of Japanese origin with HLAB*31:01 and Koreans with HLA-B*44:03 are also at increased risk of SJS after receiving the same two drugs. Of the antiepileptics, one most commonly associated with SJS is lamotrigine, a pre-synaptic voltage-gated sodium channel inhibitor. Lamotrigine is an antiepileptic drug of the phenyltriazine class that is indicated for the prevention of focal and generalized seizures in epileptic patients as well as monotherapy or adjunctive maintenance treatment for Bipolar disorder. The occurrence of SJS is not a rigid contraindication to lamotrigine reintroduction in the same patient. To facilitate this, manufacturers have developed a strict re-challenge dosing regimen to facilitate successful reintroduction of lamotrigine. In order to prevent the recurrence of SJS during a re-challenge, timing of re-dose and initial rash severity must be considered. Therefore, to prevent SJS recurrence, prime lamotrigine re-challenge patients are those with mild initial rash that has not occurred within the previous 4 weeks. The Federal Food and Drug Administration recommends the testing HLA subtypes for those associated with SJS prior to starting lamotrigine.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8146560PMC
March 2021

Reconsidering Olanzapine as a Possible Culprit for Drug Fever, defying "Incomplete Neuromalignant Syndrome".

J La State Med Soc 2016 Jul-Aug;168(4):123-4. Epub 2016 Aug 15.

University Health Hospitals-Shreveport, LA.

This case is important because it is the first time Olanzapine-induced fever has been described in the absence of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. In the context of the available antipsychotics with the atypical agents dominating the pool, only few of those are known to be well tolerated among the patients. Fever may be looked at by the physicians as a minor problem yet, it can be disabling to the large set of patients. Fever was not considerably listed as one of the side effects for Olanzapine and should not be confused with the incomplete neuromalignant syndrome.
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September 2017

Wernicke's encephalopathy in a patient with hyperemesis gravidarum.

Psychosomatics 2012 Mar-Apr;53(2):172-4. Epub 2012 Jan 13.

Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine Shreveport, Shreveport, LA 71103, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psym.2011.06.005DOI Listing
July 2012
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