Publications by authors named "Mary E Clark"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Prevalence, risk factors, and response to treatment for hypersomnia of central origin in survivors of childhood brain tumors.

J Neurooncol 2018 Jan 8;136(2):379-384. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

Division of Nursing Research, Department of Pediatrics, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA.

Daytime sleepiness is recognized in childhood brain tumor survivors. Our objective was to determine prevalence, risk factors for PSG/MLST proven hypersomnia/narcolepsy, and response to stimulants in childhood brain tumor survivors. Standard PSG/MSLT criteria were used to diagnose hypersomnia/narcolepsy. Medical records of brain tumor survivors having undergone a PSG/MSLT were reviewed for the diagnostic code of hypersomnia/narcolepsy. Survivors with hypersomnia/narcolepsy were matched with 2-3 survivors without reported hypersomnia/narcolepsy by age at tumor diagnosis, gender, and time from tumor diagnosis. Between January 2000 to April 2015, 39 of the 2336 brain tumor patients treated at our institution were diagnosed with hypersomnia/narcolepsy for a prevalence rate of 1670/100,000. Hypersomnia/narcolepsy was diagnosed at a median of 6.1 years (range 0.4-13.2) from tumor diagnosis and 4.7 years (range - 1.5 to 10.4) from cranial radiation. Midline tumor location (OR 4.6, CI 1.7-12.2, p = 0.002) and anti-epilepsy drug (AED) use (OR 11, CI 2.4-54) correlated with hypersomnia/narcolepsy while radiation dose > 30 Gray trended towards significance (OR 1.8, CI 0.9-3.6); posterior fossa tumor location reduced the risk (OR 0.1, CI 0.04-0.5, p = 0.002). AED use also correlated with midline tumor location. Thirty-seven survivors were treated with stimulants and reported improved wakefulness and school performance [response rate CI 0.97 (0.86-0.99) and 0.83 (0.65-0.94)]. Prevalence of hypersomnia/narcolepsy among childhood brain tumor survivors was higher than the general population. Tumor location and radiation dose were possible risk factors, and stimulants were reported to be beneficial.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11060-017-2662-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5814140PMC
January 2018

Intestinal-Type Adenocarcinoma Arising in a Mature Cystic Teratoma of the Ovary.

Int J Gynecol Pathol 2016 Jul;35(4):352-6

San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Department of Pathology and Area Laboratory Services, Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas.

Here, we present a rare case of intestinal type adenocarcinoma arising in mature cystic teratoma (MCT) and review all previously reported similar cases with emphasis on the immunohistochemical characteristics of prior cases. Nine prior cases of intestinal type adenocarcinoma arising in MCT have been previously reported. Two of the prior cases as well as this case have been associated with CA19-9 elevation. CK20 is consistently strongly positive and CK7 is usually negative in cases of intestinal type adenocarcinoma arising in MCT. This contrasts with mucinous tumors of the ovary which are known to be usually CK7 strongly positive and inconsistently CK20 positive. The pattern of strong CK20 staining and often negative or weak CK7 staining is common to mucinous neoplasms arising in MCT. These findings suggest that the less common subset of primary mucinous ovarian tumors that have strong CK20 staining and partial or negative CK7 staining may represent a group of tumors with germ cell origin rather than the more common surface epithelial origin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PGP.0000000000000258DOI Listing
July 2016

Rosette-forming glioneuronal tumour in a patient with multiple sclerosis.

Histopathology 2015 Nov 22;67(5):751-3. Epub 2015 May 22.

Department of Neurology, San Antonio Military Medical Center, JBSA-Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/his.12710DOI Listing
November 2015

Rapid prescreen of cervical liquid-based cytology preparations: results of a study in an academic medical center.

Diagn Cytopathol 2012 Aug 31;40(8):691-7. Epub 2010 Dec 31.

Department of Pathology, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, VA, USA.

A rapid prescreening or rapid rescreening method for quality assurance in cervical cytology has been used in Europe and in Canada but has not been accepted in the United States. The rapid prescreen method was tested in a cytology laboratory that serves an academic medical center with a high-risk population for cervical cancer. For a period of 3 months, a tray of 20 sequentially numbered Surepath™ liquid-based preparations, randomly selected from the cervical cytology daily workload, were each prescreened in a random fashion for 1 minute. Experienced cytotechnologists performed the rapid prescreen. Results were recorded as negative, further review needed, or epithelial cell abnormality, category specified. The 20 cervical cytology preparations were then replaced in their same position in the daily workload for routine screening performed by another cytotechnologist. Final interpretation was by a cytopathologist as requested or required by Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988. The rapid prescreen data was tabulated and compared with data for a similar time period using the laboratory's normal quality assurance program. Seven hundred and twelve cases underwent rapid prescreen. Six hundred and forty-two were interpreted as negative. Twenty-six cases were interpreted as low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LGSIL) or higher. Forty-four cases were classified as needing further review. For the 642 negative cases by rapid prescreening, routine screening reported 537 as negative and 105 as either abnormal or needed cytopathologist review. The error rate for the rapid prescreen is 50 of 712 (7.0%); for LGSIL and above 19 of 712 (2.6%). Of the 105 abnormal cases or those submitted for cytopathologist review, 31 were interpreted as atypical squamous cells of undermined significance (ASCUS), 41 cases as reactive/repair, 17 as LGSIL, 4 as unsatisfactory, 1 as atypical squamous cells, cannot rule out high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (ASC-H), 8 as the presence of endometrial cells in a women aged >40, 1 as malignant melanoma, and 2 as within normal limits with the presence of Actinomyces. The laboratory's routine quality assurance program selects cases, 10% of initially interpreted negative cases plus any gynecologic cytology on patients with a prior abnormal cervical cytology, or history of cervical epithelial cell abnormality. This quality assurance program averages 29% of cases, 4,045 of a total of 13,767, in 2008. Thirty-seven (0.9%) cases were detected in this rescreen (ASCUS, 16 cases; LGSIL, 13 cases; 1 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion; 4 ASC-H; and 3 atypical glandular cells of undetermined significance). Eliminating ASCUS cases, eight significant cases were detected, with an error rate of 0.2%. In this cytology laboratory, the rapid prescreen did not prove as reliable as routine quality assurance program for cervical cytology cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/dc.21598DOI Listing
August 2012

Regional public health emergency preparedness: the experience of Massachusetts Region 4b.

Public Health Rep 2008 Jul-Aug;123(4):450-60

Regional Preparedness Health Planning, Advanced Practice Center for Emergency Preparedness, Cambridge Public Health Department, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.

Historically, local public health in Massachusetts has been largely decentralized, with each town responsible for providing local public health services. After 9/11, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) began to plan for bioterrorism and other possible public health emergencies and found that having 351 separate departments made emergency planning difficult and dispersing of funds a challenge. To facilitate this process, MDPH created seven emergency preparedness regions and asked local public health departments to engage in joint planning. This article describes the formation of Region 4b and how the region came together to work on emergency preparedness issues. It also examines the organizational, financial, and planning challenges associated with organizing these towns as a unified entity.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2430641PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/003335490812300406DOI Listing
October 2008

Photosynthesis in balance with respiration?

Authors:
Mary E Clark

Science 2006 Aug;313(5789):917-8; author reply 917-8

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.313.5789.917DOI Listing
August 2006