Publications by authors named "Mary C Kasch"

5 Publications

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Does hand therapy literature incorporate the holistic view of health and function promoted by the World Health Organization?

J Hand Ther 2011 Apr-Jun;24(2):84-7; quiz 88. Epub 2011 Mar 9.

Aaron & Rose Hand Therapy Services, Inc., Houston, Texas, USA.

The International Classification of Function (ICF), as formulated by the World Health Organization (WHO), is an accepted international standard for categorizing health and disability. We examined the frequency that ICF domains have been included in 788 Journal of Hand Therapy articles and 78 hand therapy articles from other sources using a scoring system based on the WHO ICF definitions. We found emphasis on body functions and body structures, with less emphasis placed on activities, participation, and environmental factors. This trend has remained stable over time despite the emergence of patient-centered disability measures. We recommend that scientists increasingly incorporate all of the WHO ICF domains in their scientific investigations to demonstrate the societal and personal impact of the profession in a language that is understood and appreciated by a wide array of health care users, policy makers, and third-party payers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2010.12.003DOI Listing
September 2011

2008 practice analysis study of hand therapy.

J Hand Ther 2009 Oct-Dec;22(4):361-75; quiz 376. Epub 2009 Sep 1.

Hand Therapy Certification Commission, Sacramento, California 95825, USA.

In 2008, the Hand Therapy Certification Commission (HTCC), in consultation with Professional Examination Service, performed a practice analysis study of hand therapy, the fourth in a series of similar studies performed by HTCC over a 23-year period. An updated profile of the domains, tasks, knowledge, and techniques and tools used in hand therapy practice was developed by subject-matter experts representing a broad range of experiences and perspectives. A large-scale online survey of hand therapists from the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand overwhelmingly validated this profile. Additionally, trends in hand therapy practice and education were explored and compared with the previous studies. The results led to the revision of the test specifications for the Hand Therapy Certification Examination; permitted refinement of the definition and scope of hand therapy; identified professional development and continuing education opportunities; and guided HTCC policy decisions regarding exam and recertification eligibility requirements.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jht.2009.06.001DOI Listing
December 2009

The International CHT Credential.

J Hand Ther 2005 Jan-Mar;18(1):46-7

International Standards Committee Hand Therapy, Certification Commission.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1197/j.jht.2004.11.003DOI Listing
May 2005

Competencies in hand therapy.

J Hand Ther 2003 Jan-Mar;16(1):49-58

Hand Therapy Certification Commission, Rancho Cordova, California 95670-6121, USA.

The Hand Therapy Certification Commission, Inc., in consultation with the Professional Examination Service, completed a practice analysis of hand therapy in 2001. One goal was to obtain information about the competencies shown by therapists at specific points of experience. Six competency areas were identified and included in the final survey: scientific knowledge, clinical judgment/clinical reasoning, technical skills, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, and resource management. Certified Hand Therapists (CHTs) in the United States and Canada participated in the survey. All six competencies were rated moderately or highly critical to professional effectiveness. Thirty hypothesized behavioral progressions (from novice to expert) were included; 27 were validated by the results, indicating that CHTs show competence that is unique and increases over time. Potential uses of these results by CHTs and hand therapy organizations are proposed, especially in regard to candidate eligibility, self-assessment by CHTs, and planning for continuing education.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0894-1130(03)80024-8DOI Listing
May 2003

A new practice analysis of hand therapy.

J Hand Ther 2002 Jul-Sep;15(3):215-25

Professional Examination Service, New York, New York, USA.

The Hand Therapy Certification Commission, Inc. (HTCC) conducted a role delineation in 2001 to characterize current practice in the profession of hand therapy. Building upon previous HTCC studies of practice (i.e., Chai, Dimick & Kasch, 1987; Roth, Dimick, Kasch, Fullenwider & Taylor, 1996), subject matter experts identified the clinical behaviors, knowledge, and technical skills needed by hand therapists. A large scale survey was conducted with therapists across the United States and Canada who rated the clinical behaviors, knowledge, and technical skills in terms of their relevance to practice, and provided information about their own patient populations. A high survey return rate (72%) was indicative of the professional commitment of CHTs to their profession. Results of the survey are discussed and practice trends are identified. A new test outline for the Hand Therapy Certification Examination was created based on the results of the survey, and the 1987 Definition and Scope of Hand Therapy was revised.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0894-1130(02)70004-5DOI Listing
January 2003
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