Publications by authors named "Mary Ann Hoffman"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Assessing Perceived Barriers to Meditation: the Determinants of Meditation Practice Inventory-Revised (DMPI-R).

Mindfulness (N Y) 2020 May 10;11(5):1139-1149. Epub 2020 Feb 10.

Department of Medical Sciences, Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University, North Haven, CT, USA.

Objectives: Engaging in meditation on a regular basis has been shown to enhance well-being. However, barriers to adopting it as a health behavior are poorly understood. The Determinants of Meditation Practice Inventory (DMPI) is an existing scale designed to measure perceived barriers to meditation. However, it was developed without factor analyses; thus, the dimensionality and construct validity of overall scale and/or subscale scores are unknown. Using factor analyses and tests of convergent validity, the present study explored the psychometric properties of the DMPI and presents a revised, psychometrically valid scale (The Determinants of Meditation Practice Inventory-Revised; DMPI-R).

Methods: Adult participants living in the USA ( = 621) provided data through an online survey platform. Extensive exploratory factor analyses were conducted ( = 311) and followed by confirmatory factor analysis ( = 310) on the best-fitting model. Convergent validity was estimated using the full sample data.

Results: Five items were removed because they demonstrated high residual variances and cross loaded onto multiple factors. Relationships among the remaining items were best explained by a four-factor structure with the following subscales: low perceived benefit, perceived inadequate knowledge, perceived pragmatic barriers, and perceived sociocultural conflict. Convergent validity was evidenced by associations between subscale scores and experiential avoidance, distress tolerance, and curiosity.

Conclusions: The multifactor structure of the DMPI-R indicates that there are multiple classes of perceived barriers on which people can vary. Validity analyses suggest that the DMPI-R is a promising measure of perceived barriers to meditation among North American adults.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12671-020-01308-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7929263PMC
May 2020

Parallel process in psychodynamic supervision: The supervisor's perspective.

Psychotherapy (Chic) 2020 06 16;57(2):252-262. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Independent Practice.

Nine postdoctoral-level experienced psychodynamic supervisors were interviewed about working with a supervisee on a case involving parallel process (PP) that started in therapy and was enacted in supervision. Consensual qualitative research was used to analyze transcripts of the interviews. The general pattern that emerged from the analysis of the supervisors' reports was that clients behaved unusually in session, therapists "got hooked" by this change, therapists enacted the client's behavior in supervision, supervisors "got hooked," supervisors reflected on their reactions and intervened in a different way; reported outcomes were mostly positive (e.g., enhanced growth or understanding for the therapist). Results of this qualitative investigation provide evidence of PP and clues as to how experienced supervisors observe, describe, and respond to PP in ways that promote growth, insight, and understanding for their supervisees. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/pst0000274DOI Listing
June 2020

When in doubt, sit quietly: A qualitative investigation of experienced therapists' perceptions of self-disclosure.

J Couns Psychol 2018 Jul;65(4):440-452

Independent Practice.

Using consensual qualitative research (CQR), we analyzed 13 interviews of experienced psychotherapists about general intentions for therapist self-disclosure (TSD), experiences with successful TSDs, experiences with unsuccessful TSDs, and instances of unmanifested urges to disclose. For TSD generally (i.e., not about a specific instance), typical intentions were to facilitate exploration and build and maintain the therapeutic relationship. Therapists typically reported becoming more comfortable using TSD over time. In successful TSDs, the typical content was accurate, relevant similarities between therapist and client; typical consequences were positive. In unsuccessful TSDs, the typical antecedent was countertransference reactions; the typical intention was to provide support; typical content involved therapists mistakenly perceiving similarities with clients; and the general consequences were negative. In instances when therapists repressed the urge to disclose, the typical antecedent was countertransference and the content typically seemed relevant to the client's issues. We conclude that effective use of TSD requires general attunement to the client's dynamics, attunement to the client's readiness in the moment, ability to manage countertransference, and ability to use a specific TSD appropriately. Implications for practice, training, and research are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cou0000288DOI Listing
July 2018

Trainees' use of supervision for therapy with sexual minority clients: A qualitative study.

J Couns Psychol 2018 Jan 25;65(1):36-50. Epub 2017 May 25.

Counseling Department, William James College.

In the supervision literature, research on sexual orientation considerations often focuses on sexual minority supervisees and less often on their work with sexual minority clients. Yet both heterosexual and sexual minority supervisees serve sexual minority clients and may have different supervision needs. Twelve predoctoral interns from 12 APA-accredited counseling center internships were interviewed about how they made use of supervision for their work with a sexual minority client. The sample consisted of 6 heterosexual-identified supervisees and 6 supervisees who identified as lesbian, gay, or queer (LGQ). Data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research. All participants reported positive gains from supervision that carried over to their work with heterosexual and sexual minority clients, even when not all supervisors disclosed or discussed their own sexual orientation. Heterosexual supervisees used supervision to ensure that their heterosexuality does not interfere with an affirmative experience for their sexual minority client, whereas LGQ supervisees used supervision to explore differences in sexual identity development between themselves and their client to minimize the negative impact of overidentification. Thus, affirmative supervision may unfold with different foci depending on supervisees' sexual identity. Implications for training and supervision are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cou0000232DOI Listing
January 2018

The work life and career development of young breast cancer survivors.

J Couns Psychol 2015 Oct 9;62(4):655-69. Epub 2015 Mar 9.

Department of Family Science, University of Maryland, College Park.

Breast cancer survivors represent the largest proportion of cancer survivors, and the rate of young breast cancer survivors who are diagnosed before the age of 40 is increasing. Cancer survivorship scholarship has begun to address many aspects of survivors' quality of life, yet the role of work and career issues have been understudied, particularly for young survivors. To explore the work lives and career development of young breast cancer survivors, this study used consensual qualitative research methodology (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997) to analyze data from qualitative interviews with 13 young women diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 40. The 4 career-related domains that emerged from the data were (a) cancer-related work challenges, (b) coping with cancer-related work challenges, (c) reappraisal of career development after cancer, and (d) components of career and life satisfaction after cancer. Experiencing breast cancer at a young age was viewed by participants as contributing to an increased desire for work to provide a sense of meaning as well as financial security and insurance. Cancer was further viewed as contributing to lost control over career success and work choices, treatment side effects that interfere with work self-efficacy and capabilities, and interpersonal difficulties connecting within and outside of work. Women with more extensive cancer treatment and side effects reported greater work struggles. Despite this, participants' cancer narratives were characterized by a range of coping strategies, including reframing and seeking control, and by evidence of persistence, resilience, and hope. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/cou0000068DOI Listing
October 2015

Beliefs and attitudes regarding human papillomavirus vaccination among college-age women.

J Health Psychol 2013 Oct 26;18(10):1360-70. Epub 2012 Nov 26.

University of Maryland, USA.

Research on the human papillomavirus vaccine has largely focused on parents' attitudes toward vaccinating their young daughters. Yet, little is known about the factors that influence human papillomavirus vaccination in college-age women who are still eligible for the vaccine. This study examined attitudes toward the human papillomavirus vaccine in 150 college-age women who had received the vaccine and 58 who had not. The Health Belief Model was used to predict vaccine intentions and to compare vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Women's self-efficacy, social environment, and perceptions of the vaccine predicted vaccine intentions and behaviors. Interventions might include these factors to promote vaccination.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1359105312462432DOI Listing
October 2013

Predoctoral interns' nondisclosure in supervision.

Psychother Res 2008 Jul;18(4):400-11

Counseling and Student Personnel Services, College of Education, University of Maryland, USA.

In interviews with 14 counseling center predoctoral interns regarding a significant nondisclosure in supervision, eight interns reported good supervisory relationships and six indicated that they experienced problematic supervisory relationships. Nondisclosures for the interns in good supervisory relationships related to personal reactions to clients, whereas nondisclosures for interns in problematic supervisory relationships related to global dissatisfaction with the supervisory relationship. In both groups, interns mentioned concerns about evaluation and negative feelings as typical reasons for nondisclosure. Additional reasons for nondisclosure for interns in problematic supervision were power dynamics, inhibiting demographic or cultural variables, and the supervisor's theoretical orientation. Both groups described negative effects of nondisclosure on themselves and their relationships with clients. Interns in problematic supervision also reported that nondisclosures had negative effects on the supervisory relationship.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10503300701697505DOI Listing
July 2008