Publications by authors named "Mary Alexander"

146 Publications

Turning the Corner.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2021 Jul-Aug 01;44(4):187

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000435DOI Listing
July 2021

Nurses Making an Impact.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2021 May-Jun 01;44(3):125-126

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000428DOI Listing
May 2021

Words Matter.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2020 Nov/Dec;43(6):313-314

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000399DOI Listing
June 2021

High Tech, High Touch 2.0.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2020 Sep/Oct;43(5):241

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000389DOI Listing
June 2021

Answering the Call.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2020 Jul/Aug;43(4):179-180

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000382DOI Listing
April 2021

2020 Year of the Nurse-Celebrate Nursing, Celebrate You.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2020 May/Jun;43(3):115-116

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000371DOI Listing
February 2021

Go the Extra Mile.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2020 Mar/Apr;43(2):59-60

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000364DOI Listing
February 2021

Reaching consensus on a home infusion central line-associated bloodstream infection surveillance definition via a modified Delphi approach.

Am J Infect Control 2020 09 23;48(9):993-1000. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

Background: A consensus on a central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) surveillance definition in home infusion is needed to standardize measurement and benchmark CLABSI to provide data to drive improvement initiatives METHODS: Experts across fields including home infusion therapy, infectious diseases, and healthcare epidemiology convened to perform a 3-step modified Delphi approach to obtain input and achieve consensus on a candidate home infusion CLABSI definition.

Results: The numerator criterion was identified by participants as involving one of the 2 following: (1) recognized pathogen isolated from blood culture and pathogen is not related to infection at another site, or (2) one of the following signs or symptoms: fever of 38°C (100.4°F), chills, or hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg), and one of the 2 following: (A) common skin contaminant isolated from 2 blood cultures drawn on separate occasions and organism is not related to infection at another site, or (B) common skin contaminant isolated from blood culture from patient with intravascular access device and provider institutes appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The criteria for a denominator included days from the day of admission with a central venous catheter to day of removal of central venous catheter. In addition, 11 inclusion criteria and 4 exclusion criteria were included.

Discussion: Home infusion therapy and healthcare epidemiology experts developed candidate criteria for a home infusion CLABSI surveillance definition.

Conclusions: Home care and home infusion agencies can use this definition to monitor their own CLABSI rates and implement preventative strategies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2019.12.015DOI Listing
September 2020

Committed to Care.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2020 Jan/Feb;43(1):9-10

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000356DOI Listing
February 2021

Look How Far We've Come!

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2019 Nov/Dec;42(6):273-274

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000349DOI Listing
August 2020

Back to School, Back to the Learning Center.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2019 Sep/Oct;42(5):225-226

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000339DOI Listing
August 2020

Put Your Passion Into Print.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2019 Jul/Aug;42(4):175-176

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000331DOI Listing
August 2020

#ThankaNurse.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2019 May/Jun;42(3):123-124

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000323DOI Listing
June 2019

Peer Reviewers Advance Excellence in Infusion Nursing.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2019 Mar/Apr;42(2):59

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000317DOI Listing
June 2019

Trends in Infusion Administrative Practices in US Health Care Organizations: An Exploratory Analysis.

J Infus Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):13-22

Purdue University Krannert School of Management, West Lafayette, Indiana (Mr Pratt, Dr Dunford); Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, Norwood, Massachusetts (Ms Alexander); Infusion Nurses Society, Norwood, Massachusetts (Ms Alexander); Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (Dr Morgeson); and Vanderbilt University Owen Graduate School of Management, Nashville, Tennessee (Dr Vogus). Benjamin R. Pratt, MS, MSW, is a doctoral candidate in the organizational behavior and human resource management program in the Krannert School of Management at Purdue University. He studies talent management, particularly in the areas of work design, employee engagement, and employee retention. Benjamin B. Dunford, PhD, is an associate professor at the Krannert Graduate School of Management at Purdue University. Professor Dunford conducts research and teaches in the areas of change management, leadership, compensation, and organizational development. He earned his PhD from Cornell University in 2004. Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN, is chief executive officer of the Infusion Nurses Society and the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation. She has presented nationally and internationally on the specialty practice of infusion nursing, and her areas of expertise include standards development, patient safety, and leadership. Frederick P. Morgeson, PhD, is the Eli Broad Professor of Management at Michigan State University. He studies how organizations can optimally identify, select, develop, manage, and retain talent. His considerable health care-related experience includes staff hiring processes, connecting workforce competencies to the patient experience, and retention in acute and long-term care settings. Timothy J. Vogus, PhD, is the Brownlee O. Currey, Jr, Professor of Management at the Owen Graduate School of Management of Vanderbilt University. His research focuses on the cognitive (ie, mindful organizing), cultural, emotional, and organizational practices and processes through which individuals, workgroups, and organizations enact highly reliable, nearly error-free patient care delivery.

While specialized infusion clinical services remain the standard of care, widespread curtailing and disbanding of infusion teams as a cost-cutting measure has been documented in health care organizations for nearly 2 decades. Owing to this trend, as well as recent government interventions in medical error control, the authors engaged in an exploratory study of infusion administration practices in the US health care industry. This article presents the authors' exploratory findings, as well as their potential implications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000308DOI Listing
February 2019

Choose to Lead.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2019 Jan/Feb;42(1):11-12

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000312DOI Listing
June 2019

Let's Take Care of Each Other.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 Nov/Dec;41(6):341-342

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000306DOI Listing
June 2019

Authors, Beware of Predatory Publishing.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 Sep/Oct;41(5):277-278

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000299DOI Listing
June 2019

Disrupting Gram-Negative Bacterial Outer Membrane Biosynthesis through Inhibition of the Lipopolysaccharide Transporter MsbA.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2018 11 24;62(11). Epub 2018 Oct 24.

Genentech, Inc., Infectious Diseases, South San Francisco, California, USA

There is a critical need for new antibacterial strategies to counter the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. In Gram-negative bacteria, the outer membrane (OM) provides a protective barrier against antibiotics and other environmental insults. The outer leaflet of the outer membrane is primarily composed of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Outer membrane biogenesis presents many potentially compelling drug targets as this pathway is absent in higher eukaryotes. Most proteins involved in LPS biosynthesis and transport are essential; however, few compounds have been identified that inhibit these proteins. The inner membrane ABC transporter MsbA carries out the first essential step in the trafficking of LPS to the outer membrane. We conducted a biochemical screen for inhibitors of MsbA and identified a series of quinoline compounds that kill through inhibition of its ATPase and transport activity, with no loss of activity against clinical multidrug-resistant strains. Identification of these selective inhibitors indicates that MsbA is a viable target for new antibiotics, and the compounds we identified serve as useful tools to further probe the LPS transport pathway in Gram-negative bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01142-18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6201111PMC
November 2018

Compounding Isn't Just for Pharmacists.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jul/Aug;41(4):217-218

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000292DOI Listing
June 2019

Structural basis for dual-mode inhibition of the ABC transporter MsbA.

Nature 2018 05 2;557(7704):196-201. Epub 2018 May 2.

Infectious Diseases, Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA.

The movement of core-lipopolysaccharide across the inner membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is catalysed by an essential ATP-binding cassette transporter, MsbA. Recent structures of MsbA and related transporters have provided insights into the molecular basis of active lipid transport; however, structural information about their pharmacological modulation remains limited. Here we report the 2.9 Å resolution structure of MsbA in complex with G907, a selective small-molecule antagonist with bactericidal activity, revealing an unprecedented mechanism of ABC transporter inhibition. G907 traps MsbA in an inward-facing, lipopolysaccharide-bound conformation by wedging into an architecturally conserved transmembrane pocket. A second allosteric mechanism of antagonism occurs through structural and functional uncoupling of the nucleotide-binding domains. This study establishes a framework for the selective modulation of ABC transporters and provides rational avenues for the design of new antibiotics and other therapeutics targeting this protein family.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41586-018-0083-5DOI Listing
May 2018

The Year of Advocacy.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 May/Jun;41(3):153

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000282DOI Listing
June 2019

Be Exceptional. Be a CRNI®.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 Mar/Apr;41(2):85-86

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000272DOI Listing
June 2019

A Novel Inhibitor of the LolCDE ABC Transporter Essential for Lipoprotein Trafficking in Gram-Negative Bacteria.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2018 04 27;62(4). Epub 2018 Mar 27.

Department of Infectious Diseases, Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, California, USA

The outer membrane is an essential structural component of Gram-negative bacteria that is composed of lipoproteins, lipopolysaccharides, phospholipids, and integral β-barrel membrane proteins. A dedicated machinery, called the Lol system, ensures proper trafficking of lipoproteins from the inner to the outer membrane. The LolCDE ABC transporter is the inner membrane component, which is essential for bacterial viability. Here, we report a novel pyrrolopyrimidinedione compound, G0507, which was identified in a phenotypic screen for inhibitors of growth followed by selection of compounds that induced the extracytoplasmic σ stress response. Mutations in , , and conferred resistance to G0507, suggesting LolCDE as its molecular target. Treatment of cells with G0507 resulted in accumulation of fully processed Lpp, an outer membrane lipoprotein, in the inner membrane. Using purified protein complexes, we found that G0507 binds to LolCDE and stimulates its ATPase activity. G0507 still binds to LolCDE harboring a Q258K substitution in LolC (LolC), which confers high-level resistance to G0507 but no longer stimulates ATPase activity. Our work demonstrates that G0507 has significant promise as a chemical probe to dissect lipoprotein trafficking in Gram-negative bacteria.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AAC.02151-17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5913989PMC
April 2018

45 and Going Strong.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2018 Jan/Feb;41(1):9-10

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000266DOI Listing
June 2019

Association between housing, personal capacity factors and community participation among persons with psychiatric disabilities.

Psychiatry Res 2018 02 5;260:300-306. Epub 2017 Dec 5.

Psychology Department, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Teaneck, NJ, USA.

There is a need to understand which housing and personal capacity factors facilitate and hinder maximum community participation among people with psychiatric disabilities. The present study examined housing and personal capacity factors associated with community participation in a large sample of persons with psychiatric disabilities living in the same neighborhoods (defined by specified zip codes). Three hundred and forty-three persons with psychiatric disabilities were recruited from congregate and independent scatter-site housing programs in 3 New York City-area neighborhoods with high concentrations of housing for persons with psychiatric disabilities. Participants completed measures of community participation, psychiatric symptoms, substance use, independent living-skill, self-efficacy, and coping style. Community participation measures grouped into 3 factors: social community participation, physical community participation, and vocational involvement. Social community participation was associated with negative symptoms and active coping, but not by housing. Independent living-skill moderated the relationship between independent scatter-site housing and social community participation. Physical community participation was associated with negative symptoms, active coping, independent living-skill, and residence in independent scatter-site housing. Vocational involvement was only associated with negative symptoms. Findings suggest that a complex array of personal capacity and housing factors are associated with community participation among persons with psychiatric disabilities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2017.11.088DOI Listing
February 2018

A Dedicated Partnership in Safe Medication Practices.

Authors:
Mary Alexander

J Infus Nurs 2017 Nov/Dec;40(6):335

INS Chief Executive Officer Editor, Journal of Infusion Nursing.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NAN.0000000000000253DOI Listing
June 2019
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