Publications by authors named "Martin G Smyth"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Crystal structure of human cytochrome P450 2D6.

J Biol Chem 2006 Mar 13;281(11):7614-22. Epub 2005 Dec 13.

Department of Discovery Research, GlaxoSmithKline, New Frontiers Science Park, Third Avenue, Harlow, Essex CM19 5AW, United Kingdom.

Cytochrome P450 2D6 is a heme-containing enzyme that is responsible for the metabolism of at least 20% of known drugs. Substrates of 2D6 typically contain a basic nitrogen and a planar aromatic ring. The crystal structure of human 2D6 has been solved and refined to 3.0A resolution. The structure shows the characteristic P450 fold as seen in other members of the family, with the lengths and orientations of the individual secondary structural elements being very similar to those seen in 2C9. There are, however, several important differences, the most notable involving the F helix, the F-G loop, the B'helix, beta sheet 4, and part of beta sheet 1, all of which are situated on the distal face of the protein. The 2D6 structure has a well defined active site cavity above the heme group, containing many important residues that have been implicated in substrate recognition and binding, including Asp-301, Glu-216, Phe-483, and Phe-120. The crystal structure helps to explain how Asp-301, Glu-216, and Phe-483 can act as substrate binding residues and suggests that the role of Phe-120 is to control the orientation of the aromatic ring found in most substrates with respect to the heme. The structure has been compared with published homology models and has been used to explain much of the reported site-directed mutagenesis data and help understand the metabolism of several compounds.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M511232200DOI Listing
March 2006

Staphylococcus aureus DNA ligase: characterization of its kinetics of catalysis and development of a high-throughput screening compatible chemiluminescent hybridization protection assay.

Biochem J 2004 Nov;383(Pt. 3):551-9

Assay Development and Compound Profiling, GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, New Frontiers Science Park (North), Third Avenue, Harlow, Essex CM19 4AW, UK.

DNA ligases are key enzymes involved in the repair and replication of DNA. Prokaryotic DNA ligases uniquely use NAD+ as the adenylate donor during catalysis, whereas eukaryotic enzymes use ATP. This difference in substrate specificity makes the bacterial enzymes potential targets for therapeutic intervention. We have developed a homogeneous chemiluminescence-based hybridization protection assay for Staphylococcus aureus DNA ligase that uses novel acridinium ester technology and demonstrate that it is an alternative to the commonly used radiometric assays for ligases. The assay has been used to determine a number of kinetic constants for S. aureus DNA ligase catalysis. These included the K(m) values for NAD+ (2.75+/-0.1 microM) and the acridinium-ester-labelled DNA substrate (2.5+/-0.2 nM). A study of the pH-dependencies of kcat, K(m) and kcat/K(m) has revealed values of kinetically influential ionizations within the enzyme-substrate complexes (kcat) and free enzyme (kcat/K(m)). In each case, the curves were shown to be composed of one kinetically influential ionization, for k(cat), pK(a)=6.6+/-0.1 and kcat/K(m), pK(a)=7.1+/-0.1. Inhibition characteristics of the enzyme against two Escherichia coli DNA ligase inhibitors have also been determined with IC50 values for these being 3.30+/-0.86 microM for doxorubicin and 1.40+/-0.07 microM for chloroquine diphosphate. The assay has also been successfully miniaturized to a sufficiently low volume to allow it to be utilized in a high-throughput screen (384-well format; 20 microl reaction volume), enabling the assay to be used in screening campaigns against libraries of compounds to discover leads for further drug development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BJ20040054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1133749PMC
November 2004

Discovery of a novel and potent class of FabI-directed antibacterial agents.

Antimicrob Agents Chemother 2002 10;46(10):3118-24

Microbial, Musculoskeletal and Proliferative Diseases Center of Excellence in Drug Discovery, GlaxoSmithKline Pharmaceuticals, Collegeville, Pennsylvania 19426, USA.

Bacterial enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (FabI) catalyzes the final step in each elongation cycle of bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis and is an attractive target for the development of new antibacterial agents. High-throughput screening of the Staphylococcus aureus FabI enzyme identified a novel, weak inhibitor with no detectable antibacterial activity against S. aureus. Iterative medicinal chemistry and X-ray crystal structure-based design led to the identification of compound 4 [(E)-N-methyl-N-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-3-(7-oxo-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1,8-naphthyridin-3-yl)acrylamide], which is 350-fold more potent than the original lead compound obtained by high-throughput screening in the FabI inhibition assay. Compound 4 has exquisite antistaphylococci activity, achieving MICs at which 90% of isolates are inhibited more than 500 times lower than those of nine currently available antibiotics against a panel of multidrug-resistant strains of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Furthermore, compound 4 exhibits excellent in vivo efficacy in an S. aureus infection model in rats. Biochemical and genetic approaches have confirmed that the mode of antibacterial action of compound 4 and related compounds is via inhibition of FabI. Compound 4 also exhibits weak FabK inhibitory activity, which may explain its antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis, which depend on FabK and both FabK and FabI, respectively, for their enoyl-ACP reductase function. These results show that compound 4 is representative of a new, totally synthetic series of antibacterial agents that has the potential to provide novel alternatives for the treatment of S. aureus infections that are resistant to our present armory of antibiotics.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC128775PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/aac.46.10.3118-3124.2002DOI Listing
October 2002