Publications by authors named "Martin E Pum"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Neuropharmacology of light-induced locomotor activation.

Neuropharmacology 2015 Aug 2;95:243-51. Epub 2015 Apr 2.

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Schwabachanlage 6, 91054 Erlangen, Germany. Electronic address:

Presentation of non-aversive light stimuli for several seconds was found to reliably induce locomotor activation and exploratory-like activity. Light-induced locomotor activity (LIA) can be considered a convenient simple model to study sensory-motor activation. LIA was previously shown to coincide with serotonergic and dopaminergic activation in specific cortical areas in freely moving and anesthetized animals. In the present study we explore the neuropharmacology of LIA using a receptor antagonist/agonist approach in rats. The non-selective 5-HT2-receptor antagonist ritanserin (1.5-6 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced LIA. Selective antagonism of either the 5-HT2A-receptor by MDL 11,939 (0.1-0.4 mg/kg, i.p.), or the 5-HT2C-receptor by SDZ SER 082 (0.125-0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination, had no significant influence on LIA. Also the selective 5-HT1A-receptor antagonist, WAY 100635 (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect LIA. Neither did the preferential dopamine D2-receptor antagonist, haloperidol (0.025-0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) nor the D2/D3-receptor agonist, quinpirole (0.025-0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) affect the expression of LIA. However, blocking the glutamatergic NMDA-receptor with phencyclidine (PCP, 1.5-6 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced LIA. This effect was also observed with ketamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). These findings suggest that serotonin and dopamine receptors abundantly expressed in the cortex do not mediate light-stimulus triggered locomotor activity. PCP and ketamine effects, however, suggest an important role of NMDA receptors in LIA.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2015.03.023DOI Listing
August 2015

The interaction between the dopaminergic forebrain projections and the medial prefrontal cortex is critical for memory of objects: implications for Parkinson's disease.

Exp Neurol 2013 Sep 9;247:373-82. Epub 2013 Jan 9.

Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Düsseldorf, Universitaetstr. 1, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany.

Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have implicated the dopaminergic nigrostriatal pathway and the prefrontal cortex in learning and memory deficits in patients with Parkinson's disease. However, little is known about how these two brain regions interact in the processing of learning and memory. We employed a disconnection procedure to test whether interaction of these regions contributes to performance in various memory tasks. Male rats received either a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into the nigro-striatal tract or a unilateral NMDA lesion in the medial prefrontal cortex, or both these lesions combined in either the same or opposite hemispheres. Spontaneous object exploration, spatial working memory, locomotor, emotional and sensorimotor tests were administered. Only the group with both lesions placed in opposite hemispheres failed to show object recognition memory. None of the groups treated with 6-hydroxydopamine showed intact temporal order memory, whereas only the groups that received combined lesions failed to show object-in-place and spatial recognition memory. No differences between groups were found in the spatial working memory test. Our data indicate that locomotor, emotional and sensorimotor factors are not likely to confound the results of the memory tests. Thus, the interaction between the dopaminergic forebrain projections, particularly the nigrostriatal dopamine, and the medial prefrontal cortex is critical for object recognition memory but not for spatial working memory in rats.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2013.01.003DOI Listing
September 2013

Intranasally applied L-DOPA alleviates parkinsonian symptoms in rats with unilateral nigro-striatal 6-OHDA lesions.

Brain Res Bull 2012 Feb 15;87(2-3):340-5. Epub 2011 Nov 15.

Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Düsseldorf, Universitaetstrasse 1, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany.

l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) remains the most effective drug for therapy of Parkinson's disease. However, the current clinical route of L-DOPA administration is variable and unreliable because of problems with drug absorption and first-pass metabolism. Administration of drugs via the nasal passage has been proven an effective alternate route for a number of medicinal substances. Here we examined the acute behavioral and neurochemical effects of intranasally (IN) applied L-DOPA in rats bearing unilateral lesions of the medial forebrain bundle, with severe depletion (97%) of striatal dopamine. Turning behavior in an open field, footslips on a horizontal grid and postural motor asymmetry in a cylinder were assessed following IN L-DOPA or vehicle administration with, or without, benserazide pre-treatment. IN L-DOPA without benserazide pre-treatment mildly decreased ipsilateral turnings and increased contralateral turnings 10-20 min after the treatment. IN L-DOPA with saline pre-treatment reduced contralateral forelimb-slips on the grid while no effects were evident in the cylinder test. These results support the hypothesis that L-DOPA can bypass the blood-brain barrier by the IN route and alleviate behavioral impairments in the hemiparkinsonian animal model.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresbull.2011.11.004DOI Listing
February 2012

The in vivo neurochemistry of the brain during general anesthesia.

J Neurochem 2011 Nov 28;119(3):419-46. Epub 2011 Sep 28.

Section of Addiction Medicine, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.

Anesthesia describes a complex state composed of immobility, amnesia, hypnosis (sleep or loss of consciousness), analgesia, and muscle relaxation. Bottom-up approaches explain anesthesia by an interaction of the anesthetic with receptor proteins in the brain, whereas top-down approaches consider predominantly cortical and thalamic network activity and connectivity. Both approaches have a number of explanatory gaps and as yet no unifying view has emerged. In addition to a direct interaction with primary target receptor proteins, general anesthetics have massive effects on neurotransmitter activity in the brain. They can change basal transmitter levels by interacting with neuronal activity, transmitter synthesis, release, reuptake and metabolism. By that way, they can affect a great number of neurotransmitter systems and receptors. Here, we review how different general anesthetics affect extracellular activity of neurotransmitters in the brain during induction, maintenance, and emergence from anesthesia and which functional consequences this may have. Commonalities and differences between different groups of anesthetics in their action on neurotransmitter activity are discussed. We also review how general anesthetics affect the response dynamics of the neurotransmitter systems after sensory stimulation. More than 30 years of research have now yielded a complex picture of the effects of general anesthetics on brain neurotransmitter basal activity and response dynamics. It is suggested that analyzing the effects on neurotransmitter activity is the logical next step after protein interactions in a bottom-up analysis of anesthetic action in the brain on the way to a unifying view of anesthesia.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-4159.2011.07445.xDOI Listing
November 2011

The effects of cocaine on light-induced activity.

Brain Res Bull 2011 Feb 12;84(3):229-34. Epub 2011 Jan 12.

Center for Behavioural Neuroscience, University of Düsseldorf, Germany.

Cocaine is a major stimulant drug which can have rewarding and locomotor activating effects. It is used by non-addicts to enhance concentration and performance in a work or social setting. It was suggested that cocaine may amplify the impact of mood and sensory stimulation on behaviour. Here we tested whether cocaine can enhance the impact of novel sensory stimulation on exploratory locomotor activity. In this study the effects of cocaine (0, 2.5, 5.0, 10mg/kg, i.p.) on the locomotor response induced by on-off light stimulation with different light intensities (0, 22, 83, 440 lx) was investigated. Visual stimulation increased locomotor activity and grooming behaviour. Cocaine more dramatically increased locomotion and rearing behaviour but suppressed grooming. Also, visual stimulation effects on grooming were reduced by cocaine. The additive relationship between the cocaine and visual stimulation effects on locomotion and rearing combined with their opposing impact upon grooming point to independent mechanisms mediating cocaine- and visual stimulation-induced behavioural activation.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainresbull.2010.12.015DOI Listing
February 2011
-->