Publications by authors named "Martin Bezdicka"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Novel presentation of the c.1856A > G (p.Asp619Gly) TSHR gene-activating variant: relapsing hyperthyroidism in three subsequent generations manifesting in early childhood and an in vitro functional study.

Hormones (Athens) 2021 Jun 18. Epub 2021 Jun 18.

Vera Vavrova Laboratory/VIAL, Department of Pediatrics, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and Motol University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: Familial non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism is a rare disease caused by germline activating variants in the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene. The c.1856A > G (p.Asp619Gly) pathogenic variant has been described in cases of toxic adenoma but never before, to our knowledge, in a case of familial non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism.

Patient Findings: A 3-year-old boy was admitted for acute gastroenteritis presenting with goiter and tall stature. Laboratory findings revealed peripheral hyperthyroidism and negativity for thyroid autoantibodies. Antithyroid drug treatment was effective, but relapses occurred shortly after attempts to decrease the drug dose. As the boy's father and paternal grandmother also experienced relapsing hyperthyroidism manifesting in early childhood, genetic testing of TSHR was indicated. The c.1856A > G (p.Asp619Gly) pathogenic variant was found in all three affected family members. Functional in vitro characterization of the variant verified that it enhances constitutional activation of the receptor, leading to increased production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Total thyroidectomy was indicated in the boy due to an unsatisfactory prognosis. Due to persistent positive thyroglobulin serum concentration, a diagnostic radioiodine scan was performed approximately 2 years later. Residual thyroid tissue was revealed; therefore, radioiodine ablative therapy was performed. Despite adequate thyroxine substitution over a long period of follow-up, TSH remained suppressed.

Conclusions: Unlike Graves' disease, familial non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism cases present with antithyroid drug-dependence. Not ultrasound but positive thyroglobulin serum concentration indicated residual thyroid tissue. Early detection of residual thyroid tissue and radioiodine ablation prevented the subject from experiencing relapsing hyperthyroidism and undergoing unnecessary repeated surgery. Life-long hormone substitution should be adjusted to free thyroxine rather than TSH serum concentrations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s42000-021-00299-xDOI Listing
June 2021

Dent Disease Type 2 as a Cause of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis in a 6-Year-Old Boy: A Case Report.

Front Pediatr 2020 28;8:583230. Epub 2020 Oct 28.

Department of Pediatrics, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Motol University Hospital, Prague, Czechia.

Dent disease is an X-linked recessive renal tubular disorder characterized by proximal tubule dysfunction. Typical features include low molecular weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, rickets, and chronic renal failure. We present a case of a 6-year-old boy with nephrotic proteinuria without hypoalbuminemia or edema. His renal biopsy revealed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), some of the glomeruli were globally sclerotic. Hypercalciuria was present intermittently and urine protein electrophoresis showed low molecular weight protein fraction of 50%. The next generation sequencing identified pathogenic variant in gene causing Dent disease type 2. We report an uncommon histologic finding of FSGS in Dent disease type 2 and highlight the importance of protein content examination and genetic analysis for the proper diagnosis in these complicated cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fped.2020.583230DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7655776PMC
October 2020

Molecular basis and outcomes of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome in Czech children.

Eur J Pediatr 2020 Nov 18;179(11):1739-1750. Epub 2020 May 18.

Department of Paediatrics, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, and Motol University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.

Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome is an ultra-rare, life-threatening disease. Causative variants in genes that encode complement factors can be identified in 40-70% of cases. We performed genetic analysis of 21 Czech children with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Genetic or acquired predisposition to the disease was identified in the majority of our patients: CFHR1 and CFHR3 deletions in 14/21 (67%; 13 of them were positive for anti-complement factor H antibodies), variants in complement genes or DGKE in 13/21 (62%). Multiple genetic findings were identified in eight patients (38%). The incidence of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome in the Czech paediatric population was estimated to be 0.092 (CI 0.053-0.131) cases per million inhabitants and 0.92 (CI 0.53-1.32) cases per 100,000 births for the entire reporting period. Ten patients were initially treated with plasma exchange and eight with eculizumab or with a combination of eculizumab and plasma exchange. At the last follow-up, 20 patients were alive and one patient had end-stage renal disease.Conclusion: The incidence of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome in the Czech paediatric population corresponds to the reported incidence in Europe. We detected the unusually high rate of CFHR1/CFHR3 deletions associated with anti-complement factor H antibodies in Czech paediatric patients. Treatment by eculizumab led to superior outcomes and prevention of the disease relapses compared with plasma exchange therapy. Our results may help to understand the polygenic nature of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome as a disease that results from a combination of various risk factors. What is Known: • Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) is considered a polygenic and multifactorial disease. Genetic predisposition to aHUS is identified in 40-70% of children. • Anti-complement factor H antibodies are usually found in 6-25% of affected children. What is New: • Potentially causative genetic or acquired factors were confirmed in the majority of patients. The prevailing finding was the unusually high rate of CFHR1/CFHR3 deletions associated with anti-complement factor H antibodies (62% of patients). • The incidence of aHUS in Czech children is 0.092 (CI 0.053-0.131) cases per million inhabitants and 0.92 (CI 0.53-1.32) cases per 100,000 births for the entire reporting period.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-020-03666-9DOI Listing
November 2020

Various phenotypes of disease associated with mutated DGKE gene.

Eur J Med Genet 2020 Aug 13;63(8):103953. Epub 2020 May 13.

Department of Paediatrics, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Motol University Hospital, V Úvalu 84, 150 06, Prague 5, Czech Republic. Electronic address:

Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome are highly rare kidney diseases that can occur in childhood. In some cases, genetic variants may trigger these conditions, although in atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome they mostly confer only a predisposition to the disease. Most variants causing atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome were identified in genes encoding proteins regulating the complement pathway; on the other hand, there are approximately 58 genes encoding distinct proteins primarily causing steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. We present a child with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and a confirmed homozygous c.966G > A, p.Trp322Ter pathogenic variant in DGKE. This variant was also found in compound with a novel DGKE heterozygous deletion c.171delG, p.Ser58Alafs*111 in a patient from our paediatric cohort with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Both cases presented with hypertension, nephrotic proteinuria and severe acute kidney injury followed by renal recovery; however, their renal histology was different. In this paper, we deal with the clinical course of children with disrupted DGKE, including the steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome overlap.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2020.103953DOI Listing
August 2020

Successful maintenance of partial remission in a child with COQ2 nephropathy by coenzyme Q10 treatment.

Nephrology (Carlton) 2020 02 28;25(2):187-188. Epub 2019 May 28.

Department of Paediatrics, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nep.13600DOI Listing
February 2020

Genetic diagnosis of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in a longitudinal collection of Czech and Slovak patients: a high proportion of causative variants in NUP93.

Pediatr Nephrol 2018 08 4;33(8):1347-1363. Epub 2018 Jun 4.

Department of Paediatrics, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and University Hospital Motol, V Uvalu 84, Prague, Czech Republic.

Background: Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) has a heterogeneous spectrum of monogenic causes that substantially differ among populations. The aim of this study was to analyse the genetic aetiology of SRNS in Czech and Slovak paediatric patients.

Methods: We analysed clinical data from 74 patients (38 boys) with congenital (15%), infant (14%), and childhood-onset (71%) SRNS collected from the Czech Republic and Slovakia from 2000 to 2017 (inclusive). The DNA samples were first analysed by Sanger sequencing (genes NPHS2, NPHS1, and WT1) and then by next generation sequencing (NGS) using a targeted panel of 48 genes previously associated with SRNS. Family segregation of the causative variants was confirmed by Sanger sequencing when possible.

Results: Genetic diagnosis was established in 28/74 patients (38%) based on findings of pathogenic or likely pathogenic causative variants in genotypes conforming to the expected mode of inheritance. Sanger sequencing diagnosed 26% of patients, whereas second-tier testing by a targeted NGS panel diagnosed a further 12%. Frequent causative genes were NPHS2 (15%), WT1 (9.5%), and surprisingly NUP93 with four (5.4%) unrelated cases. Additional causative genes included COQ2 (two patients), NPHS1, INF2, DGKE, and LMX1B (one patient each).

Conclusions: Compared with outright use of NGS, our tiered genetic testing strategy was considerably more rapid and marginally less expensive. Apart from a high aetiological fraction of NPHS2 and WT1 genes, our study has identified an unexpectedly high frequency of a limited set of presumably ancestral causative mutations in NUP93. The results may aid in tailoring testing strategies in Central European populations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00467-018-3950-2DOI Listing
August 2018
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