Publications by authors named "Marta Lopez-Fauqued"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Review of the initial post-marketing safety surveillance for the recombinant zoster vaccine.

Vaccine 2020 04 7;38(18):3489-3500. Epub 2019 Dec 7.

GSK, Avenue Fleming 20, Wavre 1300, Belgium. Electronic address:

Background: The adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) received its first marketing authorization in October 2017, for prevention of herpes zoster in individuals aged ≥50 years.

Methods: We summarized safety information, following RZV administration, received by GSK via spontaneous adverse event (AE) reports submitted by healthcare providers, vaccine recipients and other reporters. Observed-to-expected (O/E) analyses were performed for selected outcomes: reports of death, Guillain-Barré syndrome and Bell's palsy. Standard case definitions were used to assess individual case reports. Data mining, using proportional reporting ratio and time-to-onset signal detection methods, was employed to identify RZV-AE pairs with disproportionate reporting or unexpected time-to-onset distribution.

Results: Between October 13, 2017 and February 10, 2019, an estimated 9.3 million doses were distributed and GSK received 15,638 spontaneous AE reports involving RZV. Most reports were classified as non-serious (95.3%) and originated from the United States (81.7%), where the majority of doses were distributed. Among reports with age or sex reported, individuals were mainly 50-69-year-olds (62.1%) and female (66.7%). Of all reports, 3,579 (22.9%) described vaccination errors, of which 82.7% were without associated symptoms. Of all vaccination error reports, most described errors of vaccine preparation and reconstitution (29.7%), inappropriate schedule or incomplete course of administration (26.7%), incorrect route of administration (16.4%), and storage errors (12.9%). The most commonly reported symptoms were consistent with the known RZV reactogenicity profile observed in clinical trials, including injection site reactions, pyrexia, chills, fatigue, headache. O/E analyses for selected outcomes and data mining analyses for all reported AEs did not identify any unexpected patterns.

Conclusions: Review of the initial data from the post-marketing safety surveillance showed that the safety profile of RZV is consistent with that previously observed in pre-licensure clinical trials. Other studies are ongoing and planned, to continue generating real-world safety data and further characterize RZV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.11.058DOI Listing
April 2020

Immunogenicity and safety of the adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine in adults with haematological malignancies: a phase 3, randomised, clinical trial and post-hoc efficacy analysis.

Lancet Infect Dis 2019 09 6;19(9):988-1000. Epub 2019 Aug 6.

CureVac, Tübingen, Germany.

Background: The adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine (Shingrix) can prevent herpes zoster in older adults and autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. We evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine in adults with haematological malignancies receiving immunosuppressive cancer treatments.

Methods: In this phase 3, randomised, observer-blind, placebo-controlled study, done at 77 centres worldwide, we randomly assigned (1:1) patients with haematological malignancies aged 18 years and older to receive two doses of the adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine or placebo 1-2 months apart during or after immunosuppressive cancer treatments, and stratified participants according to their underlying diseases. The co-primary objectives of the study were the evaluation of safety and reactogenicity of the adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine compared with placebo from the first vaccination up to 30 days after last vaccination in all participants; evaluation of the proportion of participants with a vaccine response in terms of anti-glycoprotein E humoral immune response to the adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine at month 2 in all participants, excluding those with non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia; and evaluation of the anti-glycoprotein E humoral immune responses to the vaccine compared with placebo at month 2 in all participants, excluding those with non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. We assessed immunogenicity in the per-protocol cohort for immunogenicity and safety in the total vaccinated cohort. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01767467, and with the EU Clinical Trials Register, number 2012-003438-18.

Findings: Between March 1, 2013, and Sept 10, 2015, we randomly assigned 286 participants to adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine and 283 to placebo. 283 in the vaccine group and 279 in the placebo group were vaccinated. At month 2, 119 (80·4%, 95% CI 73·1-86·5) of 148 participants had a humoral vaccine response to adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine, compared with one (0·8%, 0·0-4·2) of 130 participants in the placebo group, and the adjusted geometric mean anti-glycoprotein E antibody concentration was 23 132·9 mIU/mL (95% CI 16 642·8-32 153·9) in the vaccine group and 777·6 mIU/mL (702·8-860·3) in the placebo group (adjusted geometric mean ratio 29·75, 21·09-41·96; p<0·0001) in all patients, excluding those with non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses persisted above baseline until month 13 in all strata and, as expected, vaccine was more reactogenic than placebo (within 7 days after vaccination pain was reported by 221 [79·5%] of 278 vaccine group participants and 45 [16·4%] of 274 placebo group participants; fatigue was reported by 162 [58·3%] of 278 vaccine group participants and 102 [37·2%] of 274 placebo group participants). Incidences of unsolicited or serious adverse events, potential immune-mediated diseases, disease-related events, and fatal serious adverse events were similar between the groups.

Interpretation: The immunocompromised adult population with haematological malignancies is at high risk for herpes zoster. The adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine, which is currently licensed in certain countries for adults aged 50 years and older, is likely to benefit this population.

Funding: GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals SA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30163-XDOI Listing
September 2019

Effect of Recombinant Zoster Vaccine on Incidence of Herpes Zoster After Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

JAMA 2019 07;322(2):123-133

Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina.

Importance: Herpes zoster, a frequent complication following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), is associated with significant morbidity. A nonlive adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine has been developed to prevent posttransplantation zoster.

Objective: To assess the efficacy and adverse event profile of the recombinant zoster vaccine in immunocompromised autologous HSCT recipients.

Design, Setting, And Participants: Phase 3, randomized, observer-blinded study conducted in 167 centers in 28 countries between July 13, 2012, and February 1, 2017, among 1846 patients aged 18 years or older who had undergone recent autologous HSCT.

Interventions: Participants were randomized to receive 2 doses of either recombinant zoster vaccine (n = 922) or placebo (n = 924) administered into the deltoid muscle; the first dose was given 50 to 70 days after transplantation and the second dose 1 to 2 months thereafter.

Main Outcomes And Measures: The primary end point was occurrence of confirmed herpes zoster cases.

Results: Among 1846 autologous HSCT recipients (mean age, 55 years; 688 [37%] women) who received 1 vaccine or placebo dose, 1735 (94%) received a second dose and 1366 (74%) completed the study. During the 21-month median follow-up, at least 1 herpes zoster episode was confirmed in 49 vaccine and 135 placebo recipients (incidence, 30 and 94 per 1000 person-years, respectively), an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 0.32 (95% CI, 0.22-0.44; P < .001), equivalent to 68.2% vaccine efficacy. Of 8 secondary end points, 3 showed significant reductions in incidence of postherpetic neuralgia (vaccine, n=1; placebo, n=9; IRR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.00-0.78; P = .02) and of other prespecified herpes zoster-related complications (vaccine, n=3; placebo, n=13; IRR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.04-0.81; P = .02) and in duration of severe worst herpes zoster-associated pain (vaccine, 892.0 days; placebo, 6275.0 days; hazard ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.42-0.89; P = .01). Five secondary objectives were descriptive. Injection site reactions were recorded in 86% of vaccine and 10% of placebo recipients, of which pain was the most common, occurring in 84% of vaccine recipients (grade 3: 11%). Unsolicited and serious adverse events, potentially immune-mediated diseases, and underlying disease relapses were similar between groups at all time points.

Conclusions And Relevance: Among adults who had undergone autologous HSCT, a 2-dose course of recombinant zoster vaccine compared with placebo significantly reduced the incidence of herpes zoster over a median follow-up of 21 months.

Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01610414.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2019.9053DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6618796PMC
July 2019

Safety profile of the adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine: Pooled analysis of two large randomised phase 3 trials.

Vaccine 2019 04 29;37(18):2482-2493. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

GSK, Wavre, Belgium. Electronic address:

Background: The ZOE-50 (NCT01165177) and ZOE-70 (NCT01165229) phase 3 clinical trials showed that the adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) was ≥90% efficacious in preventing herpes zoster in adults. Here we present a comprehensive overview of the safety data from these studies.

Methods: Adults aged ≥50 (ZOE-50) and ≥70 (ZOE-70) years were randomly vaccinated with RZV or placebo. Safety analyses were performed on the pooled total vaccinated cohort, consisting of participants receiving at least one dose of RZV or placebo. Solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) were collected for 7 and 30 days after each vaccination, respectively. Serious AEs (SAEs) were collected from the first vaccination until 12 months post-last dose. Fatal AEs, vaccination-related SAEs, and potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs) were collected during the entire study period.

Results: Safety was evaluated in 14,645 RZV and 14,660 placebo recipients. More RZV than placebo recipients reported unsolicited AEs (50.5% versus 32.0%); the difference was driven by transient injection site and solicited systemic reactions that were generally seen in the first week post-vaccination. The occurrence of overall SAEs (RZV: 10.1%; Placebo: 10.4%), fatal AEs (RZV: 4.3%; Placebo: 4.6%), and pIMDs (RZV: 1.2%; Placebo: 1.4%) was balanced between groups. The occurrence of possible exacerbations of pIMDs was rare and similar between groups. Overall, except for the expected local and systemic symptoms, the safety results were comparable between the RZV and Placebo groups irrespective of participant age, gender, or race.

Conclusions: No safety concerns arose, supporting the favorable benefit-risk profile of RZV.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.03.043DOI Listing
April 2019

Immunogenicity and Safety of the Adjuvanted Recombinant Zoster Vaccine in Chronically Immunosuppressed Adults Following Renal Transplant: A Phase 3, Randomized Clinical Trial.

Clin Infect Dis 2020 01;70(2):181-190

GSK, Wavre, Belgium.

Background: The incidence of herpes zoster is up to 9 times higher in immunosuppressed solid organ transplant recipients than in the general population. We investigated the immunogenicity and safety of an adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) in renal transplant (RT) recipients ≥18 years of age receiving daily immunosuppressive therapy.

Methods: In this phase 3, randomized (1:1), observer-blind, multicenter trial, RT recipients were enrolled and received 2 doses of RZV or placebo 1-2 months (M) apart 4-18M posttransplant. Anti-glycoprotein E (gE) antibody concentrations, gE-specific CD4 T-cell frequencies, and vaccine response rates were assessed at 1M post-dose 1, and 1M and 12M post-dose 2. Solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) were recorded for 7 and 30 days after each dose, respectively. Solicited general symptoms and unsolicited AEs were also collected 7 days before first vaccination. Serious AEs (including biopsy-proven allograft rejections) and potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs) were recorded up to 12M post-dose 2.

Results: Two hundred sixty-four participants (RZV: 132; placebo: 132) were enrolled between March 2014 and April 2017. gE-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were higher in RZV than placebo recipients across postvaccination time points and persisted above prevaccination baseline 12M post-dose 2. Local AEs were reported more frequently by RZV than placebo recipients. Overall occurrences of renal function changes, rejections, unsolicited AEs, serious AEs, and pIMDs were similar between groups.

Conclusions: RZV was immunogenic in chronically immunosuppressed RT recipients. Immunogenicity persisted through 12M postvaccination. No safety concerns arose.

Clinical Trials Registration: NCT02058589.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cid/ciz177DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6938982PMC
January 2020

Immunogenicity and safety of the adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine in patients with solid tumors, vaccinated before or during chemotherapy: A randomized trial.

Cancer 2019 04 1;125(8):1301-1312. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

GSK, Wavre, Belgium.

Background: The adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) has demonstrated >90% efficacy against herpes zoster in adults ≥50 years of age and 68% efficacy in autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients ≥18 years of age. We report the immunogenicity and safety of RZV administered to patients with solid tumors (STs) before or at the start of a chemotherapy cycle.

Method: In this phase 2/3 observer-blind, multicenter study (NCT01798056), patients with STs who were ≥18 years of age were randomized (1:1) to receive 2 doses of RZV or placebo 1-2 months apart and stratified (4:1) according to the timing of the first dose with respect to the start of a chemotherapy cycle (first vaccination 8-30 days before the start or at the start [±1 day] of a chemotherapy cycle). Anti-glycoprotein E (gE) antibody concentrations, gE-specific CD4 T cell frequencies, and vaccine response rates (VRRs) were assessed 1 month after dose 1 and 1 and 12 months after dose 2. Reactogenicity and safety were assessed in the total vaccinated cohort through 12 months after dose 2.

Results: There were 232 participants in the total vaccinated cohort, 185 participants in the according-to-protocol cohort for humoral immunogenicity, and 58 participants in the according-to-protocol cohort for cell-mediated immunogenicity. Postvaccination anti-gE antibody concentrations, gE-specific CD4 T cell frequencies and VRRs were higher in RZV recipients than in placebo recipients. Solicited adverse events (AEs) were more frequent among RZV recipients than placebo recipients. Incidence of unsolicited AEs, serious AEs, fatalities, and potential immune-mediated diseases were similar between RZV and placebo recipients.

Conclusion: RZV was immunogenic in patients with STs receiving immunosuppressive chemotherapies. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses persisted 1 year after vaccination. No safety concerns were identified.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cncr.31909DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6766894PMC
April 2019

A randomized lot-to-lot immunogenicity consistency study of the candidate zoster vaccine HZ/su.

Vaccine 2017 12 24;35(48 Pt B):6700-6706. Epub 2017 Oct 24.

Pfizer Inc., 500 Arcola Road, Collegeville, PA, USA. Electronic address:

Background: The risk of developing herpes zoster (HZ) increases with age and is thought to be associated with a decrease in cell-mediated immunity in older adults. The adjuvanted varicella-zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein E (gE) recombinant subunit vaccine (HZ/su) showed >90% efficacy in the prevention of HZ when administered in adults ≥50 years of age. Here we aim to evaluate immunogenicity consistency of 3 different HZ/su vaccine lots and to assess safety of these lots.

Methods: This multicenter, phase III, double-blind, randomized study (NCT02075515), assessed lot-to-lot consistency in terms of immunogenicity of HZ/su and also assessed safety of these lots. Participants aged 50 years or older were randomized (1:1:1) to receive 2 doses of HZ/su, 2 months apart, from 1 out of 3 randomized HZ/su lots (Lots A, B and C). Humoral immunogenicity was assessed pre-vaccination and 1 month post-second vaccination by anti-gE antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Lot-to-lot consistency was demonstrated if the 2-sided 95% confidence intervals of the anti-gE geometric mean concentration ratio between all lot pairs were within 0.67 and 1.5. Solicited symptoms were recorded within 7 days and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) within 30 days after each vaccination. Serious AEs (SAEs) and potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs) were reported until study end (12 months post-second vaccination).

Results: Of 651 participants enrolled in the study, 638 received both doses of the HZ/su vaccine and 634 completed the study. Humoral immune responses were robust and consistency between 3 manufacturing lots was demonstrated. The incidence of solicited symptoms, unsolicited AEs and SAEs was comparable between all lots. Three fatal SAEs, 1 in each lot, were reported, none of which were considered vaccine-related by investigator assessment. Two out of the 8 reported pIMDs were considered vaccine-related by the investigator.

Conclusion: The three HZ/su manufacturing lots demonstrated consistent immunogenicity. No safety concerns were identified. Clinical trial registry number: NCT02075515 (ClinicalTrials.gov).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.10.017DOI Listing
December 2017

Immunogenicity and Safety of an Adjuvanted Herpes Zoster Subunit Vaccine Coadministered With Seasonal Influenza Vaccine in Adults Aged 50 Years or Older.

J Infect Dis 2017 12;216(11):1352-1361

GSK Vaccines, King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.

Background: The immunogenicity and safety of an adjuvanted herpes zoster subunit (HZ/su) vaccine when coadministered with a quadrivalent seasonal inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV4) was investigated in a phase 3, open-label, randomized clinical trial in adults aged ≥50 years.

Methods: Subjects were randomized 1:1 to receive either HZ/su (varicella zoster virus glycoprotein E; AS01B Adjuvant System) and IIV4 at day 0 followed by a second HZ/su dose at month 2 (coadministration group), or IIV4 at month 0 and HZ/su at months 2 and 4 (control group). The primary objectives were the HZ/su vaccine response rate in the coadministration group and the noninferiority of the antibody responses to HZ/su and IIV4 in the coadministration compared with the control group. Safety information was collected throughout the duration of the study.

Results: A total of 413 subjects were vaccinated in the coadministration group and 415 in the control group. The HZ/su vaccine response rate in the coadministration group was 95.8% (95% confidence interval, 93.3%-97.6%) and the anti-glycoprotein E GMCControl/Coadmin ratio was 1.08 (.97-1.20). The primary noninferiority objectives were met. No safety concerns were observed.

Conclusions: No interference in the immune responses to either vaccine was observed when the vaccines were coadministered, and no safety concerns were identified.

Clinical Trials Registration: NCT01954251.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jix481DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5853904PMC
December 2017

Results on exposure during pregnancy from a pregnancy registry for AS04-HPV-16/18 vaccine.

Vaccine 2017 09 30;35(40):5325-5330. Epub 2017 Aug 30.

GSK, Wavre, Belgium.

Objective: To assess pregnancy outcomes after exposure to AS04-HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cervarix, GSK, Belgium) prior to, or during pregnancy, as reported to a pregnancy registry.

Methods: A pregnancy exposure registry was established to collect data in the United Kingdom and the United States. Exposure was defined as vaccination with AS04-HPV-16/18 within 60days before the estimated conception date and delivery. Reporting was voluntary.

Results: Between September 2007 and November 2015, 306 pregnancy exposure reports were received of which 181 were prospective, evaluable reports. From these 181 reports, 154 (85.1%) pregnancies resulted in a live birth, 14 (7.7%) in spontaneous abortion, one (0.5%) in stillbirth, and 12 (6.6%) were electively terminated. There was no clustering of outcomes with respect to the timing of exposure. There were 18 infants born with a congenital anomaly of which nine were minor structural defects, seven were major structural defects, one was a hereditary disorder and one was likely the result of a congenital infection. In three cases of structural defect (two minor and one major), there was a temporal association to vaccination during the critical developmental period of gestation. There was no cluster or constellation of congenital anomalies suggestive of possible teratogenesis.

Conclusion: The pharmacovigilance plan to investigate the effects of inadvertent exposure to AS04-HPV-16/18 vaccine during pregnancy included assessment of pregnancy outcomes among women enrolled in clinical trials, evaluation of pregnancy exposure reports from all countries as part of routine passive safety surveillance, a large, well conducted post-authorization observational study, and the pregnancy registry. These registry data complement other data from clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance showing no evidence that vaccination with AS04-HPV-16/18 during the defined exposure period (within 60days before conception until delivery) increases the risk of teratogenicity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.08.042DOI Listing
September 2017

Protein arginine methyltransferase 5 regulates ERK1/2 signal transduction amplitude and cell fate through CRAF.

Sci Signal 2011 Sep;4(190):ra58

Mouse Models and Cancer Laboratory, Anatomy Pathology Department, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute, Barcelona 08035, Spain.

The RAS to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction cascade is crucial to cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Although numerous growth factors activate the RAS-ERK pathway, they can have different effects on the amplitude and duration of the ERK signal and, therefore, on the biological consequences. For instance, nerve growth factor, which elicits a larger and more sustained increase in ERK phosphorylation in PC12 cells than does epidermal growth factor (EGF), stimulates PC12 cell differentiation, whereas EGF stimulates PC12 cell proliferation. Here, we show that protein arginine methylation limits the ERK1/2 signal elicited by particular growth factors in different cell types from various species. We found that this restriction in ERK1/2 phosphorylation depended on methylation of RAF proteins by protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5). PRMT5-dependent methylation enhanced the degradation of activated CRAF and BRAF, thereby reducing their catalytic activity. Inhibition of PRMT5 activity or expression of RAF mutants that could not be methylated not only affected the amplitude and duration of ERK phosphorylation in response to growth factors but also redirected the response of PC12 cells to EGF from proliferation to differentiation. This additional level of regulation within the RAS pathway may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.2001936DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6312726PMC
September 2011

The dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PI-103 promotes immunosuppression, in vivo tumor growth and increases survival of sorafenib-treated melanoma cells.

Int J Cancer 2010 Apr;126(7):1549-61

Medical Oncology Research Program, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d'Hebron Hospital, Barcelona 08035, Spain.

Melanoma is the most lethal human skin cancer. If metastatic, it becomes very aggressive and resistant to standard modalities of anticancer treatment. During the last 10 years, several therapeutic strategies have been tested including the use of single and combined small drugs. Experimental results indicate that RAS and PI3K pathways are important for the development and maintenance of melanoma. In this study, we assessed the in vitro and in vivo inhibition potential of PI-103, a PI3K (p110alpha)/mTOR inhibitor and sorafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, as single agents and in combination in primary melanoma cell lines. Although PI-103 and sorafenib inhibited melanoma in vitro cell proliferation and viability, the inhibition of RAS pathway appeared to be more effective. The combination of the two agents in in vitro showed a synergistic effect inhibiting RAS and PI3K pathways in a cell line dependent manner. However, no cooperative effect was observed in blocking in vivo tumor growth in immunocompetent mice. In contrary to the expected, the data indicate that PI-103 induced immunosuppression promoting in vivo tumor growth and inhibiting apoptosis. Furthermore, in vitro studies examining the effects of the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor in tumor derived cell lines indicated that PI-103 induced the anti-apoptotic BH3 family proteins Mcl1, Bcl2 and Bcl(xL) favoring, the in vitro survival of sorafenib treated melanoma cells. These data certainly makes an argument for investigating unexpected effects of rational drug combinations on immunocompetent animal models prior to conducting clinical studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.24926DOI Listing
April 2010