Publications by authors named "Marsa Zaroudi"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Effect of omega-3 fatty acids supplementation on anthropometric indices in children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Complement Ther Med 2020 09 26;53:102487. Epub 2020 Jun 26.

Student Research Committee, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2020.102487DOI Listing
September 2020

Functional activities of beta-glucans in the prevention or treatment of cervical cancer.

J Ovarian Res 2020 Mar 5;13(1):24. Epub 2020 Mar 5.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, I.R, Iran.

Cervical cancer is the fourth-ranked cancer in the world and is associated with a large number of deaths annually. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are known as the common therapeutic approaches in the treatment of cervical cancer, but because of their side effects and toxicity, researchers are trying to discovery alternative therapies. Beta-glucans, a group of glucose polymers that are derived from the cell wall of fungi, bacteria, and etc. it has been showed that beta-glucans have some anti-cancer properties which due to their impacts on adaptive and innate immunity. Along to these impacts, these molecules could be used as drug carriers. In this regard, the application of beta-glucans is a promising therapeutic option for the cancer prevention and treatment especially for cervical cancer. Herein, we have summarized the therapeutic potential of beta-glucans alone or as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of cervical cancer. Moreover, we highlighted beta-glucans as drug carriers for preventive and therapeutic purposes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13048-020-00626-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7057557PMC
March 2020

The Effects of Melatonin Supplementation on Parameters of Mental Health, Glycemic Control, Markers of Cardiometabolic Risk, and Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Hemodialysis Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

J Ren Nutr 2020 05 6;30(3):242-250. Epub 2019 Oct 6.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran. Electronic address:

Objective: This study evaluated the effects of melatonin supplementation on parameters of mental health, glycemic control, markers of cardiometabolic risk, and oxidative stress in diabetic hemodialysis (HD) patients.

Design: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 60 diabetic HD patients, 18-80 years of age. Participants were randomly divided into 2 groups to take either melatonin (2 x 5mg/day) (n = 30) or placebo (n = 30) 1 hour before bedtime for 12 weeks. The effects of melatonin on mental health, metabolic status, and gene expression related to metabolic status were assessed using multiple linear regression adjusting for age and BMI.

Results: Melatonin supplementation significantly decreased Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (P = .007), Beck Depression Inventory index (P = .001), and Beck Anxiety Inventory index (P = .01) compared with the placebo. Additionally, melatonin administration significantly reduced fasting plasma glucose (β = -21.77 mg/dL, 95% CI -33.22 to -10.33, P < .001), serum insulin levels (β = -1.89 μIU/mL, 95% CI -3.34 to -0.45, P = .01), and homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (β = -1.45, 95% CI -2.10 to -0.80, P < .001), and significantly increased the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (β = 0.01, 95% CI 0.007-0.02, P < .001) compared with placebo treated subjects. In addition, melatonin administration resulted in a significant reduction in serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (β = -1.92 mg/L, 95% CI -3.02 to -0.83, P = .001) and plasma malondialdehyde (β = -0.21 μmol/L, 95% CI -0.36 to -0.06, P = .005); also, significant rises in plasma total antioxidant capacity (β = 253.87 mmol/L, 95% CI 189.18-318.56, P < .001) and nitric oxide levels (β = 2.99 μmol/L, 95% CI 0.71-5.28, P = .01) were observed compared with the placebo.

Conclusion: Overall, melatonin supplementation for 12 weeks to diabetic HD patients had beneficial effects on mental health, glycemic control, inflammatory markers, and oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.jrn.2019.08.003DOI Listing
May 2020

The effects of vitamin D supplementation on mental health, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with psychiatric disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2019 08 13;94:109651. Epub 2019 May 13.

Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran. Electronic address:

Background: In the current meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), the effects of vitamin D supplementation on mental health, and biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress in patients with psychiatric disorders are assessed.

Methods: The following databases were search up to March 2019: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The quality of the relevant extracted data was assessed according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data were pooled by the use of the inverse variance method and expressed as mean difference with 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI).

Results: Eleven effect sizes from nine studies were included in the final analyses. A pooled analysis of 9 effect sizes showed a significant reduction in Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score following supplementation with vitamin D [weighted mean difference (WMD): -3.91; 95% CI: -5.15 -2.66), I= 85.9%]. Combining data from two available studies on the effects of vitamin D supplementation on Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) also revealed a significant reduction in this score following the intervention (WMD: -1.78; 95% CI: -2.28, -1.28). In addition, there were significant increase in glutathione (GSH) through 3 studies (WMD: 180.70; 95% CI: 6.76, 354.64), and in total antioxidant capacity (TAC) through 3 studies (WMD: 90.09; 95% CI: 56.36, 123.82) after vitamin D supplementation. Combining data from five studies, we found a significant reduction in C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations after vitamin D supplementation (WMD: -1.74; 95% CI: -2.82, -0.66).

Conclusions: Overall, the current meta-analysis demonstrated that taking vitamin D supplements among patients with psychiatric disorders had beneficial effects on BDI, PSQI, GSH, TAC and CRP levels, but did not affect other biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pnpbp.2019.109651DOI Listing
August 2019

The Combined Effects of Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors on All-Cause Mortality: The Golestan Cohort Study.

Arch Iran Med 2016 Nov;19(11):752-761

Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Background: Most studies that have evaluated the association between combined lifestyle factors and mortality outcomes have been conducted in populations of developed countries.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the association between combined lifestyle scores and risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality for the first time among Iranian adults.

Methods: The study population included 50,045 Iranians, 40 - 75 years of age, who were enrolled in the Golestan Cohort Study, between 2004 and 2008. The lifestyle risk factors used in this study included cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and Alternative Healthy Eating Index. The lifestyle score ranged from zero (non-healthy) to 3 (most healthy) points. From the study baseline up to analysis, a total of 4691 mortality cases were recorded. Participants with chronic diseases at baseline, outlier reports of calorie intake, missing data, and body mass index of less than 18.5 were excluded from the analyses. Cox regression models were fitted to establish the association between combined lifestyle scores and mortality outcomes.

Results: After implementing the exclusion criteria, data from 40,708 participants were included in analyses. During 8.08 years of follow-up, 3,039 cases of all-cause mortality were recorded. The adjusted hazard ratio of a healthy lifestyle score, compared with non-healthy lifestyle score, was 0.68 (95% CI: 0.54, 0.86) for all-cause mortality, 0.53 (95% CI: 0.37, 0.77) for cardiovascular mortality, and 0.82 (95% CI: 0.53, 1.26) for mortality due to cancer. When we excluded the first two years of follow up from the analysis, the protective association between healthy lifestyle score and cardiovascular death did not change much 0.55 (95% CI: 0.36, 0.84), but the inverse association with all-cause mortality became weaker 0.72 (95% CI: 0.55, 0.94), and the association with cancer mortality was non-significant 0.92 (95% CI: 0.58, 1.48). In the gender-stratified analysis, we found an inverse strong association between adherence to healthy lifestyle and mortality from all causes and cardiovascular disease in either gender, but no significant relationship was seen with mortality from cancer in men or women. Stratified analysis of BMI status revealed an inverse significant association between adherence to healthy lifestyle and mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer among non-obese participants.

Conclusion: We found evidence indicating that adherence to a healthy lifestyle, compared to non-healthy lifestyle, was associated with decreased risk of all-cause mortality and mortality from cardiovascular diseases in Iranian adults.
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http://dx.doi.org/0161911/AIM.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5783545PMC
November 2016

Dietary Patterns Are Associated with Risk of Diabetes Type 2: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.

Arch Iran Med 2016 Mar;19(3):166-72

Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari, Iran, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Objective: We aimed to assess the relationship between major dietary patterns and risk of diabetes type 2 among Iranian adults.

Methods: In this population-based case-control study in Mazandaran province, we enrolled 332 subjects (110 newly diagnosed cases and 222 controls) aged 43 - 77 years. Dietary intakes were collected using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Data on demographic, anthropometric, socioeconomic characteristics and other covariates were collected using structured lifestyle questionnaires. Factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated for risk of type 2 diabetes across quartiles of dietary pattern scores.

Results: Three major dietary patterns were identified, including: "healthy", "transitional" and "traditional". A significant direct association was found between the transitional dietary pattern and risk of diabetes type 2 after adjustment of potential confounders (OR = 2.17; 95% CI: 1.0, 4.50; Ptrend = 0.02). The traditional dietary pattern was significantly associated with the increased risk of diabetes type 2 after controlling for confounders (OR = 2.13; 95% CI: 1.03, 4.41; Ptrend = 0.01). There was no significant relationship between healthy dietary pattern and risk of diabetes type 2.

Conclusions: In conclusion, transitional dietary pattern characterized by high consumption of salt, organ meats, dried fruits, poultry, tea, low- fat dairy and other vegetables. Traditional dietary pattern characterized by high intakes of garlic, dough, high- fat dairy, dried fruits, red meats, grains, as well as animal and hydrogenated fats were associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. No significant associations were found between the healthy dietary pattern and risk of diabetes type 2.
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http://dx.doi.org/0161903/AIM.003DOI Listing
March 2016